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ionicus's (ionicus on UKA) UKArchive
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Title
The Greatest (posted on: 06-06-16)
...of all times. A tribute.

 photo Cassius Clay_zpsvwp1tnny.jpg Let's mourn a legend who's passed away. He started life as Cassius Clay but was reborn as Muhammad Ali when he converted to the faith of Islam. Although a fighter who changed boxing into a fine art, he was for peace and strongly opposed the war in Vietnam in which he refused to take part. He became famous for the rumble in the jungle fighting George Foreman and making him tumble. He was also known for his many scraps with Frazier and Liston as well as his raps. ''I'm the greatest'', he was known to cry comparing himself to a butterfly agilely floating in the prize ring but ultimately lethal with a bee's sting. I'm only able to offer a personal tribute with a simple rhyme: may the world salute the greatest of all time. © Luigi Pagano 2016

Archived comments for The Greatest
Mikeverdi on 06-06-2016
The Greatest
He was the greatest, no one else comes close. As a boxer he was just that, as a man of his time, he passed into Legend.
Never to be forgotten.

Thanks for the tribute Luigi.
Mike

Author's Reply:
No worries, Mike. Just a little something to keep the wheels turning.
Cheers, Luigi

ifyouplease on 07-06-2016
The Greatest
well-penned tribute Luigi

x

Author's Reply:
Thanks Nic.

Luigi x

Supratik on 09-06-2016
The Greatest
I am happy to read this poem as I am a great admirer of Ali.

Author's Reply:
Thanks for reading, Supratik.


Collateral Damage (posted on: 11-12-15)
My entry to this week's Flash Challenge - Prompt by Franciman: Innocent victims.

Outside Parliament a crowd with placards was demonstrating against intervention. Inside Westminster politicians debated the wisdom of having the opposite intention. People understood the reaction caused by the attack on Paris that ended in carnage and yet were afraid of indiscriminate bombing that might result in collateral damage. Especially since an American plane had mistakenly hit an Afghan hospital. To join the coalition and fight extremism requires, we are told, a strong committal. Our bombs, be assured, have precision built in and no one is in danger of losing their limbs. I wish I could trust this glib reassurance; a stray bomb could kill many innocent victims. My wish is that all lay down their arms, sit round the table and talk of peace. We shall be relieved that casualties will stop and lives will be saved when all conflicts cease. © Luigi Pagano 2015

Archived comments for Collateral Damage
Gee on 11-12-2015
Collateral Damage
"I wish I could trust
this glib reassurance;"
Definitely agreed. Sadly, while those in power make these decisions, the innocent and powerless will always be the victims.

Author's Reply:
Unfortunately, the wishes of the electorate are sometimes ignored by politicians who engage in warfare that they believe will produce a better outcome, without regard to the people caught in the crossfire.
Despite unsuccessful attempts to restore peace in many troubled regions with this kind of policies,
'lessons' still haven't been learned.
Thanks for reading and commenting.
Luigi

franciman on 11-12-2015
Collateral Damage
Hi Luigi,
I admire both the sentiments and the craft displayed. A great read.
cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Many thanks for having suggested the theme for the Flash Challenge, Jim, and I'm glad that my interpretation meets with your approval.
Much obliged, Luigi

Mikeverdi on 12-12-2015
Collateral Damage
Well done Luigi, I think you said it all. We keep poking the wasp nest and wondering why we get stung.
Mike

Author's Reply:
Your analogy aptly sums up the situation, Mike.
Thank you, Luigi

teifii on 12-12-2015
Collateral Damage
All too true. I certainly don't believe the 'glib reassurance.'

Author's Reply:
You are one of a legion, Daff. I stand alongside you.
Luigi x

Bozzz on 12-12-2015
Collateral Damage
One questions not only the honesty but also the sanity of those who claim negligible collateral damage. Who told the Americans to adopt our cricketing terms for their military? For example, 'collateral damage' is merely a 'wide', failure to explode, just a 'no-ball', A route march is but a 'leg stump'. Great poem Luigi...David

Author's Reply:
I must admit that I hadn't seen it as a cricketing allegory but it makes a lot of sense. Thanks for sharing your thoughts.
Luigi



Seen But Not Heard (posted on: 27-11-15)
Don't frighten the horses.

Rich Victorian children, but not the poor, were kept in the dark about the adults' improper behaviour and what went on behind closed doors. Seen but not heard by unloving parents they were brought up by diligent nannies and spared the sight of bare piano's legs considered prurient. * It was recognised by the upper class that men and women enjoyed copulation but it was taboo to admit it publicly to the whole nation. The moral standards hypocritically applied show the duplicity that pervaded that era. It was OK to horse around ''so long as they don't do in the streets and frighten the horses'' ** © Luigi Pagano 2015 * There was a myth that the Victorians were so sexually repressed that they covered the legs of pianos for modesty but it has been suggested that they may have done so to protect them from dust or cats' scratches. ** Quote by the writer Daphne Fielding.

Archived comments for Seen But Not Heard
Texasgreg on 27-11-2015
Seen But Not Heard
Aye Luigi,
I believe history, (both late and current), to have shown that repression and censorship result in deviance...
Very good!

Greg πŸ™‚

 photo Gunspincowboy.gif

Author's Reply:
Hi Greg. Nice to hear from you once again.
Your views reflect my sentiments exactly.
Best wishes, Luigi

franciman on 27-11-2015
Seen But Not Heard
Hi Luigi,
Savage Irony that just works so well. Great piece.
cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Cheers Jim. Greatly appreciated.
Best, Luigi

pommer on 27-11-2015
Seen But Not Heard
Hi Luigi,
well written as usual,enjoyable to read .Peter

Author's Reply:
Peter, I am grateful to you for letting me have your opinion.
Cheers, Luigi

Pronto on 27-11-2015
Seen But Not Heard
Very enjoyable Luigi. They certainly had double standards back then as many a pretty parlour maid could have vouched.

Author's Reply:
You are so right, Tony. In the words of the 1930 song: "it's the poor what get the blame, it's the rich what get the pleasure!"

Bozzz on 28-11-2015
Seen But Not Heard
To hide frequent rape perhaps? I don't fancy trying to seduce a piano leg!. Is the word/photo 'penis' in the same category? A droll story beautifully written Luigi....David

Author's Reply:
I wouldn't be surprised, David. A lot that went on in that period was swept under the carpet but it is a well known fact that the Victorians were keen collectors of erotica and, no doubt, eager practitioners.
Thanks for reading and commenting.
Luigi

Popeye on 29-11-2015
Seen But Not Heard
A fine write about the hypocrisy of "The Righteous" very much enjoyed the read.

Author's Reply:
Many thanks, Davy.
Best, Luigi

ValDohren on 29-11-2015
Seen But Not Heard
Yes indeed, and we all know about Queen Vic's sexual behaviour, don't we!
As for piano legs, well they can look a tad sexy (te he).
Val X


Author's Reply:
There is another example of double standards, Val. Although she was highly sexed she disapproved very strongly of her sons amorous escapades.
Luigi x


Mirror, Mirror... (posted on: 09-10-15)    
***

The weather, unseasonal, is balmy and soothing; not a cloud in the sky to spoil her enjoyment of the remnants of October. It is now sundown and the light is fading but not enough to hide the vanishing looks that the mirror reveals. She peels off the false lashes, wipes the rouge from her lips while her mind still clings to the memories of youth. She ruefully realises there will be fewer times to relive the passion she's experienced till now. Though her head still clamours for one more fling the body bows to the end of her Indian summer. © Luigi Pagano 2015

Archived comments for Mirror, Mirror...
Nomenklatura on 09-10-2015
Mirror, Mirror...
Well done, Luigi. Time waits for no (wo)man.

Author's Reply:
Indeed Ewan. In fact it doesn't differentiate between genders.

Andrea on 09-10-2015
Mirror, Mirror...
Blimey, reminds me of me, Luigi, but without the slap πŸ™‚

You know what they say...'...the older one gets, the more attractive one was...'

Seriously, great pome...



Author's Reply:
Thanks for the accolade, Andrea. What I say is: once a beauty, always a beauty.
There are still some glamorous grannies around.

Luigi x

ValDohren on 09-10-2015
Mirror, Mirror...
No mention of the comb-overs and beer-bellies then Luigi !!!
Val

Author's Reply:
I wasn't aware that SHE was encumbered by those afflictions as well, Val !!!
Luigi

ValDohren on 09-10-2015
Mirror, Mirror...
SHE isn't encumbered by the aforementioned afflictions, of course - my point being Luigi, why are women always the subject of old age rather than men !
Val

Author's Reply:
I know perfectly what your point was Val, I was being ironic. My answer was in reference to the fact that the piece was an interpretation of the Indian summer and it isn't easy to associate comb-overs and beer bellies with that topic. I have been critical of men, young an old, several times and have even been self-deprecating in my poetry. I shall search my archives and find some relevant pieces to demonstrate this.
In the meantime rest assured that I am aware that, as Ewan pointed out, time waits for no man - as well as woman.
Best wishes, Luigi.

ValDohren on 10-10-2015
Mirror, Mirror...
SHE isn't encumbered by the aforementioned afflictions, of course - my point being Luigi, why are women always the subject of old age rather than men !
Val

Author's Reply:

Bozzz on 10-10-2015
Mirror, Mirror...
Bravo friend, but what with all this feminist/antifeminist stuff about there is no hope for the past it of either sex - or walking dead like me. Nothing left to pull out save hearing aids, false teeth, spectacles, nose hairs - sans everything. Please move up 30 years and have another go, Luigi Regards...David

Author's Reply:
But don't we delude ourselves that "there is life in the old dog yet?"
In another 30 years I shall be 110!
Cheers, Luigi

sweetwater on 10-10-2015
Mirror, Mirror...
It's an annoying fact ( for most of us ladies ) that as the year ages it gets more beautiful, even the so called 'dead' of winter still carries it's own type of loveliness, although I think this can be the same for many 'older' ladies. But I really felt the the sadness of the woman in your poem. I think it sums up the dreaded realisation that youth has really gone and nothing can ever be as good, but one's spirit still longs to Rock with the rest, well mine does anyway! Sue.

Author's Reply:
Yes Sue. It is true that all of us, men and women, would wish to maintain the looks and vitality of our younger selves despite the inexorable march of time. Some people are fitter than others and even in old age can remain active longer. Whatever the situation is, one must face reality.

Luigi x

shadow on 11-10-2015
Mirror, Mirror...
Reality? Who needs it, when we have Photoshop? I'm all for eternal youth. Now, where's the botox . . .

Author's Reply:
An alternative would be the portrait of Doriaan Gray.

gwirionedd on 11-10-2015
Mirror, Mirror...
Wow, this is brilliant, Luigi!

If you don't mind me saying so, I think that you write much better when you don't rhyme. I think that rhyme constricts you too much. (Your gargantuan attempt at a five-stanza Chant Royal is an extreme example of this).

This poem, on the other hand, is possibly the best thing I have read from you. Please do keep it up! A well-deserved nomination indeed.

The Autumn years of life, eh? They await us all......



Author's Reply:
Thanks for your kind assessment and for picking this as a 'hot' story, Archie. I find rhyming very easy and don't find it constricting but perhaps the readers might find a bit forced.
My poetry is predominantly in that form but I also experiment in blank verse.
Best wishes, Luigi


An Awkward Situation (posted on: 18-09-15)    
An experimental piece in the Chant Royal form written after reading "Archie is one Psycho Ex" by gwirionedd. It is a difficult style to master and rather drawn out. Since it originated in France in the 14th century and was introduced into England in the 19th, it may be old fashioned and impractical.

The Chant Royal is a poetic form that is a variation of the ballad form and consists of five eleven-line stanzas with a rhyme scheme a-b-a-b-c-c-d-d-e-d-E and a five-line envoi rhyming d-d-e-d-E or a seven-line envoi c-c-d-d-e-d-E. To add to the complexity, no rhyming word is used twice.
***
I thought that she was spoiling for a fight when hurling insults she slapped my face. That blow had the strength of dynamite and immediately I knew I was in disgrace. I wondered why she was in such a state; perhaps it was because I came home late. I tried to explain but it wasn't any use, she was quite determined to blow a fuse and was adamant I was having an affair. There was no way she'd accept my excuse. Did I ever tell you that life is so unfair? Trying hard to make her forget the slight I wanted to grasp her in a warm embrace and have vigorous sex throughout the night but she had already packed a big suitcase as it was her firm intention to emigrate. I begged her to stay and asked her to wait so that we could calmly talk and call a truce yet what I received in return was only abuse. My aim all this time was to clear the air but she was at best purblind or else obtuse. Did I ever tell you that life is so unfair? I did not want my girlfriend to lose sight of the fact that a total breakup would erase all our cherished memories, out of spite, and of our relationship there'd be no trace. I had never seen my beloved so irate since I nearly stood her up on the first date. If she left me I'd have to live like a recluse or, alternatively , embark on a luxury cruise where on the upper deck I'd lounge in a chair with nothing to do but largely snooze. Did I ever tell you that life is so unfair? I feared that her repressed anger might force her into demanding a breathing space and in so doing she'd feel within her right although that attitude would debase the long standing friendship with her mate who'd much prefer a discussion more sedate than her ramblings that were very profuse. Her fallacious arguments were too abstruse but she delivered them with a great flair. I'd been unjustly accused but I stayed loose. Did I ever tell you that life is so unfair? There is nothing I can do now: she took flight; I am too upset and don't want to give chase. She deserted me, regardless of my plight, displaying bad manners and lack of grace. To be quite honest I am not feeling great and to other women I cannot yet relate; perhaps it is due to indulging in booze - ideally I should stick to pure orange juice - I have erotic dreams about a Swedish au-pair the first woman in a line that I'd like to seduce. Did I ever tell you that life is so unfair? I'm slowly recovering from the initial bruise and new emotions are replacing the blues; the sexual urges are more than I can bear, perversely my ex is the one I would choose. Did I ever tell you that life is so unfair? © Luigi Pagano 2015

Archived comments for An Awkward Situation
shadow on 19-09-2015
An Awkward Situation
Wow! That is brilliant. How do you manage to keep it up? (The rhyme scheme I mean). I tried to write a sonnet once - nearly killed me.

Author's Reply:
It wasn't easy to maintain the rhythm and the rhyming scheme but with some concentration and a lot of doggedness I managed to get to the end. Judging by the number of comments I received priory to yours,
you seem to be the only one who had the stamina to read it to the end and I am grateful that you did.
Now I know that my marathon hasn't been in vain. Thanks.
Luigi x

deadpoet on 19-09-2015
An Awkward Situation
I was fascinated by this - it is brilliant Luigi- you are a master poet.
Pia xx

Author's Reply:
Nearly missed your comment, Pia. Thrilled that you liked this and hazard a guess that it was you who nominated it. Thanks very much,
Luigi xx

gwirionedd on 26-09-2015
An Awkward Situation
For an old man you don't half have a fiery libido, Luigi!

Anyway, well done on the chant royal. I notice you set yourself the task of a five-stanza version, which is extremely difficult in English. It would be easier in French or Italian, I think.

My one is a three-stanza version. Three is enough, I think. But if you want to put another hill on top of the hill, then go for it!



Author's Reply:
Archie, I try my hardest to keep it up to scratch and that's just my writing. I found the form quite difficult to implement and now I learn that my task could have been easier. I blindly followed the description which mentioned five stanzas. That will teach me not to take things too literally. I am not likely to attempt another chant royal, or a sestina for that matter. So from now on let's sing something simple. Your poem was terrific and inspired me to follow your example.
Best wishes, Luigi.


As Time Goes By (posted on: 07-08-15)
***

As time goes by memories fade and events tend to be forgotten. Who does now recall the innocently named Little Boy, descending at speed from high in the sky, in a great ball of fire? The hibakusha do. They are the people on whom a black rain left an indelible mark at 8.15 on the morning of the 6th August 1945 and yet survived. Their testimony tells of the fate that befell a tranquil city on a hot and cloudless day: the buzz of a plane, a flash of transcendent power, a mushroom cloud. Seventy years have passed since the day of that cataclysm; bells toll in remembrance of the moment when time stood still before the catastrophe ensued. A reminder of the grim potential that technology possesses. © Luigi Pagano 2015

Archived comments for As Time Goes By
e-griff on 07-08-2015
As Time Goes By
Excellent, luigi. πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Many thanks, John.

pommer on 07-08-2015
As Time Goes By
A very significant observation Luigi,well thought out. Will we ever learn? be lucky, Peter.

Author's Reply:
Your kind comment is appreciated, Peter.

Mikeverdi on 09-08-2015
As Time Goes By
Yes, excellent, well written Luigi. I note you don't pass comment on the right and wrong of the situation, and it shouldn't be forgotten that number two was on the way.
Mike

Author's Reply:
Hi Mike, the moral question has been debated at length over the years. My stance is anti-war and I believe that conflicts always bring pain and misery to innocent civilians, no matter what the justification for military intervention is.
My objective in this poem was to highlight the fact that if the atomic bomb had not been developed the catastrophe would have been avoided.


Blue Nun and Babycham (posted on: 27-04-15)
The swinging sixties. A recollection.

My generation was against the gun. 'Make love not war' was the battle cry. At dinner parties we drank 'Blue Nun' and on television we watched 'I Spy'. Smart young women had Babycham, joined peace rallies, enjoyed the thrill. Burned their bras, didn't give a damn and for contraception went on the pill. The swinging sixties was the decade that changed our view of social taboos. People took pride in being self-made; some wore long hair, some had tattoos. We all believed that the only solution to shake politicians in their ivory tower was to initiate an unarmed revolution and called for peace with flower power. Our uniform was blue jeans and sandals, went to pop concerts and enjoyed sex. We witnessed many political scandals and the assassination of Malcolm X. We came very close to burning our boats: thought that we were virile young blades and may have sowed too many wild oats, but I've forgotten as the memory fades. We wanted to put the regime to the test and freedom for all was the watchword; we went on marches and tried our best but still did not manage to save the world. © Luigi Pagano 2015

Archived comments for Blue Nun and Babycham
Mikeverdi on 27-04-2015
Blue Nun and Babycham
Ah yes..I remember it well πŸ™‚ That was my world,minus the blue nun and babycham. For me it was cider and Afghan hash. πŸ™‚ Nice trip down the lane Luigi.
Mike

Author's Reply:
Same era, different paths Mike.
Cheers.

sweetwater on 27-04-2015
Blue Nun and Babycham
Sadly the whole flower power thing passed me by, I was knee deep in leather jackets and bike engines! Babycham was good but a little too refined for a biker, vodka and lime was better but after I got tipsy on six in a row I decided alcohol was not for me! I rather wish now that I had experienced it all though. Loved the stirred up memories you have created. Sue πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
I can see that you were made of harder stuff than us city - or should I say sissy - boys, Sue. A lot went on at the time and not all good and, having escaped unscathed, it's good to reminisce.

Luigi x

Supratik on 28-04-2015
Blue Nun and Babycham
The fourth stanza is worth reading a thousand times! Please keep such poems coming... who knows may be some day we will! Best. Supratik

Author's Reply:
Amen to that Supratik. Thanks for reading and commenting.

Gee on 28-04-2015
Blue Nun and Babycham
Ah, if only it had been possible to save the world. There's a great feeling of nostalgia with this but also a hope and passion for change that I feel is lacking today.
Beautifully expressed.

Author's Reply:
I am afraid it was too great an undertaking to save the world, Gee, but we maintain that hope.
Nice to hear from you again after a lengthy absence. Thanks for reading and commenting.

Luigi

pommer on 28-04-2015
Blue Nun and Babycham
What a lovely trip down memory lane.I am afraid that like Sue I was of a different generation in some ways. We were rockers in the old style, Fast heavy bikes,leather outfits, worn at the knees from cornering, and so on.However I liked this one as it revived so many memories.Well done Luigi, Peter.

Author's Reply:
Hi Peter, I was not in the same mould as you and Sue, as I previously pointed out. I am glad that these nostalgic reminiscences have been appreciated not only by you but by the 'nibbers' too. Thanks.

Luigi

Pronto on 28-04-2015
Blue Nun and Babycham
Oh yes I know what you mean but I was a soldier in those far off days always being sent to where the natives didn't want me! I remember drinking Mateus Rose and eating chicken-in-a-basket being the height of cool when courting! Lovely poem Luigi well penned sir.

Author's Reply:
How inconsiderate of the natives not to welcome the bringers of democracy to their shores!
I too remember the Mateus rosΓ© and the chicken-in-a basket, Pronto. Their power of seduction failed for me, alas.

Cheers, Luigi

deadpoet on 29-04-2015
Blue Nun and Babycham
I am still a flower child Luigi . Lovely poem.
Pia

Author's Reply:
Glad to hear it, Pia. Good on you.

Luigi xx


Lacunae (posted on: 19-09-14)
My entry to this week's Prose/Poetry weekly challenge. Key word: memories.

As the old folk dwelt on their memories he sat with mouth agape and mystified; the longer he listened to their stories the more his bewilderment intensified. He had tried to conjure up his past life but could not dredge up from his brain any information that he could recount. Exploring his cortex had been in vain. His power of recollection is now extinct because when it comes to the crunch not only does his long memory fail him he cannot recall what he had for lunch. © Luigi Pagano 2014

Archived comments for Lacunae
Pilgermann on 19-09-2014
Lacunae
Concise and to the point. Fine structure and ending.

Author's Reply:
Thanks for looking in, P.
Life can be cruel sometimes.

pommer on 19-09-2014
Lacunae
How very true.Enjoyed the read, Luigi. Peter

Author's Reply:
Pleased you enjoyed the read, Peter. Thanks.

Luigi

Bozzz on 20-09-2014
Lacunae
I could not remember what this poem was about, but many thanks for the breakfast - it was magnificent - porridge especially.
Bravo Luigi....David

Author's Reply:
I seems that everything is tickety-boo with you, young David. That is good but keep an eye on that porridge in case it turns out to be sausages and baked beans. I am sure that was my collation...or was it yesterday's? Cheers.

Luigi

Gothicman on 20-09-2014
Lacunae
I once tested people with memory problems with psychometric tests with verbal, logical inference, and group content, and memory recall was ongoing and with three hour delay, but most of those tested failed to return! Now with text message reminders in cell phones it works better! Yes, is memory loss a godsend at the end? The outreach team tell me that Nature dampens sensoric memory to minimize anxiety and should be appreciated.. but it is premature loss to those who lose the person cared about, nevertheless. Well.written, Luigi, worthy of its nib (I've asked Andrea not to nib anything I submit now, but that's only my preference) Trevor

Author's Reply:
Thanks Trevor for letting me know your interesting observations on the various psychometric tests and the reactions to them. It is also useful to note that Nature dampens sensoric memory to minimize anxiety. Your feedback is appreciated.

Luigi

woodbine on 26-09-2014
Lacunae
Witty, to the point and well structured.
John

Author's Reply:
Your endorsement is very welcome, John. Thank you.

Best, Luigi


An Eventful year (posted on: 08-09-14)
Inspired by Dr. James Fox's documentary Bright Lights, Brilliant Minds: A Tale of Three Cities.

1928 was an eventful year for Paris; the capital was a hive of activity. In smoky bars Hemingway and co. appealed to the muse for creativity, the artists Dali, Magritte and Bunuel, who adopted a revolutionary stance with a concept founded on incongruity, brought a bizarre new vision to France. Musicians and dancers came in droves, the Folies Bergθre got a new soubrette - the 'Creole Goddess' Josephine Baker - who replaced the famous Mistinguett and whose act was even more risquι appearing virtually nude on the stage. Nonconformity became very popular and was representative of that age. Everyone seemed to heed the advice of the song that said: 'Anything goes'; they derived enjoyment from a full life and at the critics thumbed their nose. © Luigi Pagano 2014

Archived comments for An Eventful year
Mikeverdi on 08-09-2014
An Eventful year
Love it, I wonder if I was born out of time? Seems Like a hoot to me πŸ™‚
Mike

Author's Reply:
A hoot? It must have been. Not only was Josephine Baker wearing nothing but bananas at the Folies Bergere accompanied by a naked choir line, but it was also a time of creativity.
That decade was called 'The Roaring Twenties' and French speakers called it the "annΓ©es folles" ("Crazy Years"), emphasizing the era's social, artistic, and cultural dynamism.

Gothicman on 08-09-2014
An Eventful year
Yes, must have been a wonderful era and situation to be a part of, like with Surrealism and Dadaism a reaction to the horrors of WWI, trying to make limited life more fun by creating new ideas of reality. Fine poem, can smell the coffee and even Hemingway's cigar. Took another 20 years for the Windmill Theatre in London to follow by perfecting frozen nudity! "If it moves, it's rude"! Hahaha, Well, Josephine Baker certainly moved, those bananas must have been threaded on strong string! Class poem, Luigi! Trevor

Author's Reply:
Many thanks, Trevor. You are right, a lot of the joie de vivre was a reaction to the WWI's horrors. It was great while it lasted. Little did they know that another war was looming on the horizon.

Luigi

Pilgermann on 11-09-2014
An Eventful year
A creatively full blooded poem to describe an epicly creative time.
Wondered whether "new" and "bizarre" should be switched around, but only briefly as the emphasis is where it should be be.

Author's Reply:
Good point, Pilgermann, I agree. Thanks.


Blood Relations (posted on: 22-08-14)
My entry to this week's Prose/Poetry challenge. The prompt was VAMPIRE.


 photo dracula_zpse93c76d6.jpg
We thought that uncle Dracula was batty, a fact that made everyone rather wary. He always wore black - sombre but natty - and his favourite drink was Bloody Mary. Perhaps it was the colour that appealed or else he had a sanguinary disposition. We are certain the truth will be revealed but in the meantime it's only supposition. He didn't seem to have much appetite and at his dinner he would simply peck; yet every now and then he felt like a bite: at that moment he was a pain in the neck. He was a sucker for an attractive maiden who yearned for a husband (but in vain) and whose cheeks would readily redden. He went immediately for her jugular vein. His odd demeanour and definite peculiarity were the subject of non-stop conversation; though we couldn't fathom him with clarity we had to admit that he was a blood relation. © Luigi Pagano 2014

Archived comments for Blood Relations
Bozzz on 23-08-2014
Blood Relations
Luigi I had no idea you were so well-connected. I suggest sending him to Sierra Leone for a holiday. It might just cure him. The poem is an imperious journey with the usual ironies rampant - a truly scholarly piece - great fun as ever - congrats on the Nib.... David

Author's Reply:
We tried, David, to encourage him to travel and broaden his horizons but to no avail. He says he can't afford the fares and he's quite happy with the Transylvanian bus pass. He quite likes those adjectives, imperious and rampant, and thanks you for them. I too offer my thanks to you for reading and commenting.
Cheers.

Pilgermann on 23-08-2014
Blood Relations
Ionicus,
A wonderful work rounded off with a great last line. It flows well and with force, the rhymes falling naturally.

BM

Author's Reply:
I am obliged to you for your feedback, Pilgermann. I had great fun writing this piece.
Best, Luigi


The Peasant Poet (posted on: 28-07-14)
A tortured soul.

Who in his right mind would get himself committed, not pressurised or compelled but by his own volition? One such person was John Clare, the ''Peasant Poet'', who at the asylum of Dr. Matthew Allen was admitted. And it had been on the advice of his publisher friend. High Beach, near Loughton, was a private institution where he stayed for four years till eighteen-forty-one but to remain, and settle in Essex, he did not intend. He absconded from the asylum and walked 80 miles in four days, on foot, alone, penniless, sleeping rough. He believed he was to meet his first love Mary Joyce, that she would receive him with hugs and smiles. Convinced he was married to her (and Martha as well) did not accept she'd died three years earlier in a fire. He remained free, mostly at home, for five months; all this time Martha, also known as Patty, suffered hell. In desperation 'Patty' asked the doctors to intervene; they referred Clare to the Northampton Lunatic Asylum where Dr. Thomas Pritchard encouraged him to write poems about nature and rural life that are evergreen. He died aged seventy-one after a troubled existence. Was said to have endured mental emotion and exertion due, as a physician put it, to 'years of poetical prosing'. He had problems but succeeded because of persistence. © Luigi Pagano 2014
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Steam and Hot Air (posted on: 28-07-14)
Keep the fires burning.

Time was when you took the initiative to keep the furnace well stocked up and asked me to drive the locomotive. We were able to build a head of steam and get those pistons going in no time. With each jolt you felt you would scream not because of anxiety but exhilaration at such a hazardous and bold enterprise, your body being aquiver with vibrations. We ensured the engine had plenty of oil and we made sure not to go off the rails yet knew the venture might go off the boil. Eventually our journeys became fewer as our engines succumbed to fatigue; we needed body parts that were newer. By that time electrification had prevailed and steam was now no more than hot air, so gradually our exploits were curtailed. You now travel to different destinations; I, having branched out from the main line, am stuck in one of Beeching's old stations. © Luigi Pagano 2014
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Cheryl Has Wed (posted on: 21-07-14)
World exclusive.

I can't go to sleep and sit up in bed. I pick up a paper: it is a red top; the headlines scream that Cheryl has wed. There's no mention of the Middle East, that over there there's total chaos, that dissidents in Iraq cause turmoil, that the Afghans held elections but can't decide who of the candidates will be the boss. That, in Mosul, the jihadists got the oil; that between Gaza and Israel there's tension, rockets are fired, air attacks are launched, but of talking peace they have no intention. There's trouble too in Lebanon and Syria, where civilians are killed and refugees suffer. If we ignore all this, it will be at our peril. I am mystified and scratch my head and ask myself: who the hell is Cheryl? © Luigi Pagano 2014

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Environment (posted on: 18-07-14)
An enviromental acrostic poem. (My entry to the weekly Prose/Poetry challenge.)

Melting iceberg photo Icebergs_zps72b138c8.jpg Environment to us is very important. Now that pollution is more rampant Vegetation is harmed by acid rain, Icebergs melt and flood the plain, Roots of trees weaken and decline. Ozone depletion is not at all benign Nor is the increase of carbon dioxide. Mountains and islands may subside Every time a seaquake fractures Nuclear power stations' structures. Too many though don't get the picture. © Luigi Pagano 2014
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No Weeping at a Wake (posted on: 14-07-14)
The soul of the party.

He had lived many years all hale and hearty and had always been the soul of the party. He'd reached a century, and that wasn't a lie, but knew that eventually he too would have to die. So when he expired, for the old man's sake, his friends organised a wonderful wake. Not with crates of beer but jeroboams of bubbly and lashings of caviar; fantastic, lovely jubbly. The feast wasn't cheap but in his last will he had left enough cash to settle the whole bill. He would have been happy to attend such a banquet; but knowing he'd be absent was his only regret. © Luigi Pagano 2014
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A Tale of Two Popes (posted on: 14-07-14)
Opposing factions and the final showdown.

I wonder how the pontiffs will cope, will Pope Francis and Pope Benedict be at peace or engaged in a conflict? On which team they rest their hope? One is German, the other Argentinian, and they are not interested in sport; it's no use asking whom they support, neither of them has formed an opinion. We are informed by a reliable source, from the Vatican, a basso profundo, they don't care for the Copa do Mundo; it's not something they would endorse. What's more, they will be at prayer at the time when the match kicks off. I can see that you're going to scoff and point out it will be on the iPlayer. © Luigi Pagano 2014
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Selfies (posted on: 11-07-14)
A new craze.

In the past, painters painted self-portraits in oil, on canvas, with a palette and a brush; although it took ages they weren't in a rush. But, with no fees, they were in dire straits. This old fashioned technique is now obsolete; the people of today have selfies, a new craze that has swept the world with a full blaze. Art has moved from the studio to the street. You can photograph yourself with a celebrity, with a president. a prime minister or the Pope but if you are exposed with a villain, you hope that it will not adversely affect your popularity. I have restrained myself from such inanity but it has always been a dream of mine to be portrayed side by side with Einstein which proves I am not exempt from vanity. © Luigi Pagano 2014
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100 Years On (posted on: 27-06-14)
Time for reflection.

 photo WorldWar1_zpsce487568.jpg The story of a fierce conflict that is one hundred years old, and was fought in foreign lands, will be told and then retold. The whole world will unite to remember the centennial and the memory of that war in our hearts will be perennial. We have all read of the losses at the Somme and Passendale where, on crimson battlefields, ensued carnage on grand scale. We shall hear anew the tales of slow advances and retreats, of courage and white feathers, of brave victories and defeats. Bodies fell and blood was spilled, the war raged on every front. As tanks rolled, guns were fired from the Isonzo to Hellespont. With the hostilities finally over everyone had to take stock and acknowledge the sad reality of the pain caused by shell shock. Those for whom the bell tolled lie at rest in permanent peace but survivors who suffered hell only hope the torment ceases. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for 100 Years On
Kat on 28-06-2014
100 Years On
A fine piece of writing. As always, I admire the ability of others to do structure/rhyme. Did this take long?

The final paragraph is a very suitable end.

Kat x

Author's Reply:
Dear Kim, nice to hear from you. Your comment is greatly appreciated and in answer to your question: it did not take long to compose, in fact it seemed to write itself with the right rhymes falling into place.
I hear that you enjoyed your writing retreat and have come back full of inspiration.

Luigi x


Costa Rica (posted on: 23-06-14)
Costa Rica victory over Italy cost England dearly.

Costa Rica were determined to nuke all the opponents that came their way. Their victory over Italy was no fluke and it was a most impressive display. Unfortunately that result also meant that England would no longer progress but bow out of this year's tournament and no words can express the distress. The English manager must now decide how to best improve the performance of a young and inexperienced side to regain composure and brilliance. They must be ready in two years time in France for the European competition; with any luck they'll be in their prime and won't face another war of attrition. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Costa Rica
Kipper on 24-06-2014
Costa Rica
Hi Luigi,
Not a football man myself, but of course I wanted England to win. (Well at least a game.)
Your lively piece made me smile (a small compensation for our side's demise ) for it suggested that the team and manager might have their work cut out. Now who'd have thunk it?
A nice summing up. Michael


Author's Reply:
Hi Michael. For some people, to quote Bill Shankly, β€œFootball's not a matter of life and death ... it's more important than that”. Although I follow football I don't go to those extremes I don't go into hysterics if my team suffers defeat. Some you win, some you lose. That my philosophy.
Cheers, Luigi.


A Strong Brew (posted on: 23-06-14)
Some like it hot.

It was a friendly caff with free Wi-Fi. She came in and sat down with a big sigh. Opened her laptop with Windows Vista but her eyes were fixed on the barista. He was in control of his machine, a big coffee maker glittering clean. She liked the way he used the wand to make the froth that went beyond her expectations. So thick and creamy that just the thought would make her steamy. And how he filled the filter basket would lift her lid and blow her gasket. She realised that she was spellbound and that she was on dangerous ground but to retreat would be too late as she had agreed to go on a date. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for A Strong Brew
sweetwater on 23-06-2014
A Strong Brew
Haha, to get so much from visiting a cafe with a coffee machine is very clever, wish I could get a date that easily! Really enjoyed this. πŸ™‚ Sue.

Author's Reply:
It's not so much the attraction of the coffee machine as that of its operator. It helps if you knew the right barista, Sue. A date would easily follow.
Luigi πŸ™‚

Elfstone on 24-06-2014
A Strong Brew
Very steamy! I love a really strong, hot cappuccino πŸ˜‰ Elf.

Author's Reply:
I can make strong, hot cappuccino and my apparatus is not complicated, Elf.
Cheers, Luigi

Mikeverdi on 24-06-2014
A Strong Brew
HaHaHa! this is one of your best! I love the whole scenario; my morning coffee will never be the same.
Mike

Author's Reply:
For us blokes an espresso is the ideal morning coffee, Mike. Nothing steamy with that beverage.

Bozzz on 26-06-2014
A Strong Brew
The sheer joy of that gush of frothy liquid that comes squirting out of the nozzle, no wonder the poor waif became on heat. How to behave badly without really trying. I'm off tomorrow to buy a machine. Thanks Luigi, master chronicler of things that work best....David

Author's Reply:
I know just the bloke who can provide you with the latest model. Guaranteed to give you the best result.
Best, Luigi.


The Swedish Bureau (posted on: 16-06-14)
A secret treasure.

It is a 19th century Swedish bureau I purchased at an auction in Truro and meant as a present for my niece so that she could write a masterpiece. Instead of which she pulled it apart and that was the extent of her Art. That action was a blessing in disguise: those letters would be lost otherwise. They had been kept in a secret drawer since the eighteen-hundreds or before. Beginning with: 'ma chθre Pauline', one said he was divorcing Josephine. Could they really be by Bonaparte? The only hint was a scarlet heart with two initials inside that read NB. Unconvincing maybe but not for me. They'd been hidden in the escritoire, that she probably kept in her boudoir, to guard their affair from prying eyes, principally those of British spies. The discovery gave us a lot of pleasure, we shall always cherish that treasure. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for The Swedish Bureau
Mikeverdi on 16-06-2014
The Swedish Bureau
This is the sort of thing you just want to be true, true that it happened and true that the letter was real.
Great story Luigi
Mike

Author's Reply:
Yes, Mike, it is everyone's dream. We are all amateur historians. You never know, it may happen one day.
Cheers, Luigi

Savvi on 16-06-2014
The Swedish Bureau
You do this so well Luigi, I wish it were true. I doth my bicorn and applaud you with my one free hand. Best NB πŸ˜‰

Author's Reply:
I have always wondered what the other hand was doing! Thanks for your riposte, Savvi.
Luigi πŸ™‚

Bozzz on 22-06-2014
The Swedish Bureau
A Swedish bureau found in England by an Italian poet who claims it was owned by a Frenchman's mistress - pull the other leg. Elegant words nonetheless. I would have added a Shavian L to the NB. L for likely. Not Bloody !....As ever, your friend...David

Author's Reply:
Dear doubting Thomas, I told this to the marines and they believed it so how can you dispute its veracity?
Your in friendship, Luigi.


May 1964 (posted on: 13-06-14)
An anniversary which may go unnoticed.

May 1964. I remember that date because of fisticuffs in Margate. They came with bikes or scooters but were no ordinary commuters. Two factions wanted to decide who was the top dog at a seaside. Rockers with Pompadour hairstyle, Mods whose objective was to rile. The fight among the two was manic, the town's residents were in panic. Fools rush in where angels fear to tread, Pope said, so I prudently fled. You might think that it's rather odd but I was neither a rocker nor a mod. I sat, as was my wont, on the fence wishing for harmony, not violence. Have I realised my wish? Not at all; even now we have perilous oddballs. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for May 1964
Andrea on 13-06-2014
May 1964
Haha, lovely, Luigi, I remember it well. I was a mod πŸ™‚

(you might want to correct your title date :))

Author's Reply:
How wrong can one be? I imagined you as a rocker, Andrea. I can't visualise you on a Lambretta but I can appreciate you being attracted by other aspects of modernism, i.e. fashion and jazz (and clubbing perhaps?)

I don't know what went wrong with the title. I am sure it was OK when I previewed it. Anyway, thanks for pointing it out. Luigi x

Andrea on 13-06-2014
May 1964
Lambretta! Pfff! Vespa, dear chap, Vespa. Then I turned into a bohemian (pre-hippy)...Jazz, blues, smoky clubs, not so much the fashion πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Vespa, of course! How could I be so plebeian as to think that a common Lambretta would be your steed.
xx

sweetwater on 13-06-2014
May 1964
Ah now this really appeals to me, pity you had to mention mods on scooters though!! I wasn't old enough to be included in 1964, but by '69 I was a rocker, a non violent one.
Smashing poem, great fun read. πŸ™‚ Sue.x

Author's Reply:
Ah, Sue. I can understand your horror at the mention of mods and scooters. After all they were the sworn enemies of any self respecting rocker. They were, though, the other side of the equation.
Glad to hear that you were not violent.
Thanks for reading and commenting. Luigi x

Mikeverdi on 13-06-2014
May 1964
Great memory lane piece Luigi, I was never either of these, Like Andrea I was an early 'beatnik' by then. We spent our time running away from them in Exeter;loads of trouble. I remember the 'Rockers' throwing a Mod and his Lambretta off Exe bridge into the river!
Mike

Author's Reply:
Hi Mike. I seem to remember there was trouble everywhere, Brighton, Margate, Clacton and Bournemouth. Now that you tell me that Exeter suffered too, I am not surprised: every tourist resort was targeted.
A Lambretta was perhaps easier to be thrown off a bridge being lighter than the more substantial Vespa, but that does not excuse the act.
Luigi

ParsonThru on 13-06-2014
May 1964
I was there second time around (Quadrophenia). I, too, sat on the fence, though a biker. Had mates in both camps and could appreciate a good Lambretta. Never been good in herds. Nice recollection Luigi.

Author's Reply:
All teenagers go through different phases in their life and the need to belong and identify themselves with their peers was very strong in the 1960s. I couldn't ride a bycicle in those days let alone a motorbike. I belonged to a generation for whom 'make love not war' made much more sense. My personal war was to achieve that particular objective. Very challenging!
Thanks for reading and commenting, Kevin.

Popeye on 14-06-2014
May 1964
Nice write Luigi, I remember it on the news, but it never really got big in Ireland; probably due to arrive here soon, after all we are 50 years behind in most things πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
You are better off without this kind of trouble, Popeye.
Best of luck, Luigi


The Beautiful Game (posted on: 30-05-14)
The first FA Cup final.

 photo 1872FA_Cup_zps36f6ada4.jpg 1872 was the year during which the first FA Cup final took place. The Royal Engineers lost one-nil but the defeat wasn't a disgrace. They gave as good as they got, a fact known by keen football fans. They all fought bravely at the Oval but their hero was William Merriman, the keeper who made many saves from the Wanderers' eight forwards; he was cheered by the spectators and praised by the press afterwards. The Engineers used innovative tactics, referred to as ''Combination Game'', - not dribbling, but passing the ball – but the novelty proved rather tame. That epic match was the beginning of what was to become a tradition: winning that coveted trophy is, nowadays, every team's ambition. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for The Beautiful Game
Bozzz on 30-05-2014
The Beautiful Game
Oh dear Luigi, I fear we should be mourning the game - as you know, it is far from beautiful - racism, bribery, match fixing, diving, professional fouls - it the ugly side of sport played for money. Write that one? You or me? Blessings...David

Author's Reply:
That may be true of the modern game David, but I'd like to think that in those days true sportsmanship still existed.


Maya (posted on: 30-05-14)
A tribute.

She told us why the caged bird sings: not to extol captivity but to wish for freedom despite its clipped wings. She too raged and fought for peace and human rights. A warrior for equality, she was the brightest light. Abused at the age of seven she made a conscious choice not to talk and for years she withheld her voice. But when heard again it became commanding, it spoke of liberty, tolerance and understanding. An unrelenting activist, great exponent of her sex, she espoused many causes with her friend Malcolm X. And now that this fiery bird has left her cage for ever we'll remember her every word, both uplifting and clever. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Maya
Mikeverdi on 30-05-2014
Maya
An excellent tribute to a fine lady Luigi.

Author's Reply:
Your comment is much appreciated, Mike. Thanks.
Regards, Luigi.

Savvi on 30-05-2014
Maya
Nice one Luigi

Author's Reply:
Glad you liked it, Savvi. Thanks.

Kipper on 01-06-2014
Maya

Luigi
I tried to put into words what I felt about this lady, but could not quite find them.

You found them for me - thank you.

Michael

Author's Reply:
Michael, many felt admiration for this phenomenal lady and I was one of them. There are not enough words to adequately describe her achievements, however much we try.

Pronto on 01-06-2014
Maya
Very well constructed tribute Ionicus, A great light and a noble spirit has been lost with her parting. May she rest in peace.

Author's Reply:
A great loss indeed, Pronto. We must be forever grateful for her legacy.


Secrets and Lies (posted on: 26-05-14)
Deceptions and espionage.

Who am I trying to kid when I say that one day -that won't come too soon- I will lift the lid on my secret life and reveal the truth, myself or the reader? Before asking the question let's just take a breather. If I were to say that I am not a buffoon but a sought after spy head-hunted by the Russians and the head of MI5, would you accept the story at its face value, would you think that I lie or that the author of this ditty is only a fantasist another Walter Mitty? You'd be wrong on all counts: I am writing a blockbuster about Reilly, ace of spies. I hope it will pass muster. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Secrets and Lies
ifyouplease on 26-05-2014
Secrets and Lies
a secretive fantasy? it will be a blockbuster i'm sure!
ehehehe

xxx

Author's Reply:
Don't we all harbour a fantasy, Nic?
Well, it would be a blockbuster if I ever got round to writing it. At the moment my time is taken up by composing silly ditties.

Luigi xxx

Mikeverdi on 27-05-2014
Secrets and Lies
Cant wait for it Luigi, I think a twist of sardonic humour will run through it πŸ™‚
Mike

Author's Reply:
It goes withouth saying, Mike.
Cheers, Luigi.

Savvi on 27-05-2014
Secrets and Lies
Ok I like the sales pitch so I guess I'm buying, but only if you put the I back in MI5 πŸ˜‰

Author's Reply:
Your wish is my command, dear reader. The things an author has to do to sell his wares! You are lucky I didn't write MFI.
Best, Luigi.


A Blackboard Jungle (posted on: 23-05-14)
Education, education, education. My entry to this week's PROSE/POETRY CHALLENGE

Taking a class is not easy to do; there's always a smartarse who knows more than you. He says that you're past it and lacks respect but from such a git what else to expect? Of offensive taunts he has made an art; his arrogance he flaunts, calls you an old fart. To manage the rest it is also a struggle, it is, I don't jest, a blackboard jungle. There's no discipline in this boisterous school: the fear is genuine that bedlam will rule. The pupils are restless, aggressive, unruly; I worry, I confess, but not unduly. Yet if I intervene to break up the fights I am told I contravene their human rights. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for A Blackboard Jungle
Mikeverdi on 23-05-2014
A Blackboard Jungle
This is a great social comment Luigi. Sadly, according to my teacher friends this would just about some it up in some classes.
Mike

Author's Reply:
This opinion is shared by many inside and outside the profession, Mike. It is an unfortunate situation that seems to occur more frequently.
Thank for the comment.
Luigi

sweetwater on 23-05-2014
A Blackboard Jungle
When I was a pupil we thought we were daring if we turned round to talk ! Since some parts of society gave up expecting discipline, decency and respect and insisted we follow suit, everything has fallen apart. Your poem is frighteningly true.

Author's Reply:
Times have indeed changed in certain sections of society, Sue, and not for the better. All we can do is to point out the malfunctions and hope. Your comment is appreciated. Thanks.
Luigi

pommer on 23-05-2014
A Blackboard Jungle
Well said ,Luigi,It appears to be the same throughout society.Two of my relatives, both teachers in Germany, recently retired,and have indicated the same attitudes you are describing.Who wants to be a teacher these days? Be lucky, Peter.

Author's Reply:
I have heard similar reports, Peter. It looks as if the teaching profession is becoming precarious.
Best wishes, Luigi.


Of Novels and Cell Phones (posted on: 19-05-14)
Five of the top ten bestsellers of 2007 in Japan were "cell phone novels." They were a new literary form, each a series of short "chapters" - usually with fewer than 200 words each - which were read on the (then) tiny screens of Japanese cell phones. Here is a 200 words poem on this topic.

I just input some purple prose on my fully-charged cell phone. I yearned to write on one of those and found that I am not alone. Writing a novel by means of a text would appear to be the latest craze. It may not be literature at its best but it has the ability to amaze. It began in Japan then went to China, spread across the world and it is said that the penmanship couldn't be finer, that such books are waiting to be read. Given the size of my miniscule cellular there cannot be more than 200 words; but there is nothing in this that's irregular unless my narrative becomes absurd. My plots shall be varied and yet simple, I'll write of unrequited love and hope; I may describe a postulant with a wimple wrestling with her faith and doesn't cope. There is no limit to one's imagination as long as one keeps the reader in suspense. I can understand many people's fascination and their interest is starting to make sense. I could have saved my time and effort if I had followed this newfangled fashion I would have derived more comfort and still indulged in my passion. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Of Novels and Cell Phones
Mikeverdi on 20-05-2014
Of Novels and Cell Phones
Clever stuff Luigi, maybe you should send this one down the wire; could be a money spinner LOL
Mike

Author's Reply:

Mikeverdi on 20-05-2014
Of Novels and Cell Phones
Clever stuff Luigi, maybe you should send this one down the wire; could be a money spinner LOL
Mike

Author's Reply:
Too late Mike. Our oriental co-authors have collared the market and got all the kudos.
Cheers.

pommer on 20-05-2014
Of Novels and Cell Phones
well said Luigi. I agree with Mike. Be lucky, Peter.

Author's Reply:
Many thanks, Peter.


Frivolity and Sincerity (posted on: 19-05-14)
My entry to last week's PROSE/POETRY CHALLENGE

There I was, whispering sweet nothings and thinking that I was being amorous when she accused me of not being serious and that my behaviour was frivolous. I assured her that I meant every word and asked why she doubted my sincerity. Hearing this she laughed like a drain but I didn't understand why the hilarity. It transpires that some gossip-monger had rumoured that I was a scoundrel, a philanderer, a libertine and a seducer with the bad reputation of a wastrel. The calumny was at best outrageous. How can anybody think that, I said, anyone can vouch for my integrity and I can swear on my children's head. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Frivolity and Sincerity
Mikeverdi on 20-05-2014
Frivolity and Sincerity
Have you been reading my Autobiography again Luigi Ha Ha!
I can always count on you to give my morning a lift.
Mike

Author's Reply:
Yes Mike, your life is an open book. Only joking my friend, glad that you got a lift out of this.

Popeye on 22-05-2014
Frivolity and Sincerity
Nice one Luigi, enjoyed the read πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Thanks Davy, glad you enjoyed this.
Luigi


Fish and Chips on Cromer's Pier (posted on: 16-05-14)
Having spent a few days on the Norfolk coast last week, reminded me of a poem I wrote a year ago extolliing the virtues of the local gastronomic delights.

Though Cromer is renowned for delicious dressed crab, it's the local fish and chips that's absolutely fab. The chippy is first class and that is nothing new; if you want to buy some food you have to join the queue. Then you'll have the choice to drown the chips in vinegar but the purists among you will shake their head and snigger. You can eat on the premises or consume it on the pier. It will go down a treat with a cool glass of beer. I don't travel all that often, I am not much of a roamer, but I always enjoy a day out on the Norfolk coast, at Cromer. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Fish and Chips on Cromer's Pier
Savvi on 18-05-2014
Fish and Chips on Cromers Pier
Oooo greasy fingers and salty lips, I'm off to buy some fish and chips. Great gastronomical poem very much enjoyed now where's that cold beer. Best Keith

Author's Reply:
Thanks for the comment, Keith, and sorry for the late reply. I believe that fish and chips is this nation's favourite apart, perhaps, from the traditional cup of tea.
Best, Luigi


The Vizier's Daughter (posted on: 12-05-14)
The Shahryar's story.

One thousand and one night, a thousand tales; the Grand Vizier's daughter held me spellbound. She told wonderful stories and kept me awake and I was bewitched by that melodious sound. I was eager to hear of exciting, exotic escapades; my requests grew more and more imperative, I could no longer contain my lust for learning, I wanted to listen to Scheherazade's narrative. She was tantalising and kept me in suspense stopping in the middle of such engrossing prose that I could hardly wait for it to be progressed but surprisingly found that I could not impose. My willpower crumbled under the pressure, I perceived an impending sense of impotence, a mellowing and a weakening of my firmness, insofar as I could no longer exert any influence. What had happened to me, the ruthless ruler, that once betrayal and infidelity could not abide? I fell head over heels with the lovely narrator and promised myself that she would be my bride. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for The Vizier's Daughter
Bozzz on 13-05-2014
The Viziers Daughter
Luigi,I do admire your persistence in pursuing unlikely partners. But among the fairer sex, I'm told that wagging tongues in youth convert to nagging ones in old age. Have a care my friend....David

Author's Reply:
If and when the wagging tongues become nagging ones, I, in my role as king of Arabia, will not hesitate to cut them off. Luigi, on the other hand, being a humble chronicler will have to suffer the consequences. Simples!


Circle of Friends (posted on: 09-05-14)
***

Let me introduce myself but excuse my diction. I joined this group today because of my addiction. As we sit here in a circle of perfect symmetry I'll tell you that my problem is not about geometry. It is something perverse: I'm relentless in my quest to find for my next verse the most apposite rhyme. Yet I know it's impossible to achieve it every time. I'm thinking of alternatives, - perhaps compose haiku- and that's why I'm asking some help from all of you. You are renowned literati and among you are those who shun all kind of poetry and say I should try prose. I considered the suggestion while we were having coffee but came to the conclusion that I can't write for toffee. I realise I can't compete with this literary mob so maybe it will be better not to give up my day job. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Circle of Friends
dylan on 11-05-2014
Circle of Friends
Brilliant, Luigi!
Some outrageous rhymes and typical wry humour.
Well played that man!
Orrabest,

D.

Author's Reply:
Cheers Jon. Where would we be if we couldn't laugh at ourselves? Relieved that you liked this as it didn't cause any ripples. Thanks.

Bozzz on 11-05-2014
Circle of Friends
A super job young man - proper "Why did I not think of writing that" sort of stuff. I award a The - you are dubbed as *The Great Luigi" and henceforth need not kneel before UKA and other royalty any more. Arise and stay risen. Love it ...David

Author's Reply:
Hi David, many times I have the same thought 'Why didn't I think...' whenever I read some interesting pieces. It is being wise after the event.
Thanks for the 'elevation'; I try my best to arise and stay risen: not an easy job but I manage (so far).
Cheers, Luigi.

ValDohren on 11-05-2014
Circle of Friends
Haha, good one Luigi - I often feel this way too ! But I am quite sure you make the grade.
Val


Author's Reply:
My consolation is that I have given up my day job. Not to become a fully fledged witer but because I retired. Writing for myself is one way to fill the time and if it entertains others, it is a bonus.
Best, Luigi.


A Russian Doll (posted on: 05-05-14)
A long distance call.

I am so excited, I'm expecting a call long distance, from Vladivostok. I'll hear Ludmilla, a nice Russian doll, who'll ring, precisely, at one o'clock. We have not yet physically met but we've come across in cyber space. Monday is a day that I won't forget for it was when I first saw her face. I am determined that I will catch her and I've asked her to come to my villa leaving behind her favourite dacha. Can't bear the suspense, it is a thriller. I have made it clear I intend to proffer a marriage proposal she can accept, that there's riches in my money coffer although at romancing I'm quite inept. It was the latter that was my downfall, she told me with the greatest regret, when at long last she made that call, that her reply would have to be niet * © Luigi Pagano 2014 * Phonetic transcription of нет (No).
Archived comments for A Russian Doll
expat on 05-05-2014
A Russian Doll
Anyone who can rhyme anything other than Rostock or Lostock with Vladivostok and still make sense gets a vote from me! πŸ˜‰
I wonder if this is the same Ludmilla that sends me emails every other day?
An entertaining little poem, as usual.

Author's Reply:
Thanks for your vote of confidence, Expat. It may well be that this Ludmilla is the same one who sends you emails, she spreads her net quite widely. Thanks for reading and commenting.

Pronto on 05-05-2014
A Russian Doll
Hmmn I know a man who sent her quite a bit of his hard earned only to find out "She" was a gangster called Boris!

Great write Luigi

Author's Reply:
There is very little difference between a Doris and a Boris, Pronto. He should have examined her/his credentials.

Mikeverdi on 06-05-2014
A Russian Doll
Another 'Gem' from your pen Luigi
Mike

Author's Reply:
Generous as ever in your appraisal, Mike. Thanks.

Bozzz on 06-05-2014
A Russian Doll


Author's Reply:
Thanks, David.

Bozzz on 06-05-2014
A Russian Doll


Author's Reply:
Thanks, David.

Bozzz on 07-05-2014
A Russian Doll


Author's Reply:
Thanks, David.

Bozzz on 07-05-2014
A Russian Doll


Author's Reply:
Thanks again, David.

Bozzz on 07-05-2014
A Russian Doll
Sorry Luigi.
These comments and markings are accidental. I am trying to find the new rating box guidelines, but am receiving info from Andrea on another planet. She says you click for it immediately below the ratings box but I cannot find it on this one...David

Author's Reply:
I see your dilemma David, the revamp of the site has caught us unprepared on certain changes. I'll have to see if I can find it.
Cheers, Luigi

ValDohren on 08-05-2014
A Russian Doll
Never mind Luigi, keep looking - but keep a right hold on your wallet. Very well written and rhymed. Enjoyed the read.
Val

Author's Reply:
No worries, Val, my wallet is superglued. Thanks for the advice though.
Luigi x


Sunbathing (posted on: 02-05-14)
On a hot tin roof.

It was a sight to be viewed: she sunbathed on the roof, her demeanour was lewd and we didn't need proof. Her movements were stiff and with her legs in the air she showed her midriff, but seemed not to care. She looked with disdain when told she was rude. Our reproach was in vain for she simply mewed. The meaning was clear: I am a cat not a hussy, I have a right to be here so do not be so fussy. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Sunbathing
Kipper on 02-05-2014
Sunbathing
A nice Dream Luigi; no hot tin roofs around here I'm afraid.
A jolly little tale but I was getting a little worried towards the end. Glad to see you avoided the temptation.

Best wishes, Michael

Author's Reply:
No need to worry, Michael, the truth will out.
Luigi πŸ™‚

pommer on 02-05-2014
Sunbathing
Hi Luigi,
what a lovely tale.I have often seen our cats that way.Best wishes, Peter.

Author's Reply:
Thanks Peter. Cheers.

ValDohren on 03-05-2014
Sunbathing
Enough to make one cat-atonic Luigi.
Val

Author's Reply:
True Val, this pussy can be put in that cat-egory.
Luigi πŸ™‚

Bozzz on 04-05-2014
Sunbathing
Tennessee miaowing complaint from above too - a bit higher up than you? Depriving a randy Tom of his catatonic. Spoilsports the pair of you. .....

Author's Reply:
Sorry David, you wouldn't cat-ch me doing that but I will cat-alogue your complaint. Cheers

Savvi on 04-05-2014
Sunbathing
Nice one Luigi, I want to come back as a cat. Keith

Author's Reply:
By all means, Savvi. Just be careful that you are not neutered. Good luck.

Savvi on 06-05-2014
Sunbathing
Ionicus said:-
By all means, Savvi. Just be careful that you are not neutered. Good luck

Too late He, He,

Author's Reply:


Lizzie's Bonnet (posted on: 25-04-14)
A novel interpretation.

 photo bonnet_zpsa855c389.png It wasn't Lizzie Bennet that Mr. Darcy admired, it was her pretty bonnet that he much desired. It would be with pride and without prejudice he'd share it with his bride and have hours of bliss. He felt very secure of his masculinity but the chapeau's allure might prove a liability. Some people may deride, women would scorn: it's only the distaff side that know how it is worn. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Lizzie's Bonnet
Bozzz on 26-04-2014
Lizzies Bonnet
Luigi, you will have the police investigating Jane herself if you are not careful. I can just see the headlines "Italian poet exposes den of Georgian vice on Yorkshire moors". ... Interesting thought, but take care lest a ton of bricks descends ....David.

Author's Reply:
It was written without prejudice, David, but there was so much Georgian vice to eclipse the 'Dolce Vita'.
Cheers.

Texasgreg on 28-04-2014
Lizzies Bonnet
Aye! "Everything's better with a bluebonnet on it." Hope you got that 'un. Don't know if it's purely an American thing. I would have never known that was her allure all along. πŸ˜‰

Greg πŸ™‚

 photo Gunspincowboy.gif

Author's Reply:
Hello Greg. Yes I have spotted the connection with Texas - that the bluebonnet is the official flower of that state - but it is purely coincidental. This spoof on 'Pride and Prejudice' was in response to the prompt in the weekly Prose/Poetry challenge.
Luigi


Royal Spotting (posted on: 25-04-14)
An old chestnut.

It was said that the Queen had been spotted in town; that she had been seen with her gillie, John Brown. The rumours were ripe with regard to that Scot: did he play the bagpipe? More likely than not, although it was inferred that he liked the sax, the instrument preferred by the Sassenachs. Cynics also said something meant to vex: that he was good in bed. It wasn't sax but sex he was able to provide to the lady of Balmoral; something on the side that people thought immoral. The question was posed, the answer was refused. That argument she closed saying ''We are not amused''. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Royal Spotting
expat on 26-04-2014
Royal Spotting
You might have been carted off to the Tower for writing this a hundred-odd years ago, Luigi!

Another pleasant little diversion. πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
I am not saying more than their contemporaries,expat. There were rumours that they had secretly married. Thanks for reading and commenting.
Luigi

Andrea on 27-04-2014
Royal Spotting
Did you see Mrs Brown, Luigi, with Judi Dench and Billy Connolly? It was excellent. As is your pome πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
I did Andrea, ages ago. It was, as you say, excellent. Perfect casting. Thanks for your little nod to this piece.
Luigi x

Kipper on 27-04-2014
Royal Spotting
A good easy to read poem, not to mention its accurate historical reference (some say)
Nicely done and brings a smile to the face.
Michael

Ref the film. I agree with you that it was perfect casting!

Author's Reply:
Fact or speculation it makes for an interesting anecdote. Your comment is appreciated. Thanks, Michael.

ValDohren on 27-04-2014
Royal Spotting
No smoke without fire, they say - Queen Vic was apparently pretty randy herself, despite the social norms of that time. Great little poem Luigi.
Val

Author's Reply:
By all accounts she was highly sexed. I wondered whether her diaries, some of which were destroyed,
contained any intimate detail.
Thanks for reading Val.
Luigi


Word Association (posted on: 21-04-14)
Originally written for QBall's 'Bonnet' challenge until I realised it exceeded the 16 lines limit.

I, daily, tick off items from the to-do list carefully compiled by my psychoanalyst. Yesterday it was the Rorschach, the test with the inkblot, but every smudge I saw for me was a blind spot. Today the exercise is word association to examine the extent of my mental aberration. He begins with bee, I reply with bonnet; he then says poem and my response is sonnet. We go on and on like this for ages, enough for anyone to explode with rage. Finally he finds that I am not really crazy but just laid back and a wee bit too lazy. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Word Association
QBall on 21-04-2014
Word Association
If you use it as an ode you can halve the number of lines and still enter the BONNET challenge
Cheers
Les Q aka QBall

Author's Reply:
Don't worry Les, I have already written a new one for the challenge. This can also be seen on ABCtales.
Cheers, Luigi

ValDohren on 23-04-2014
Word Association
Wonder what Freud would make of this Luigi - makes for fascinating reading, I wonder what your mental aberration is - ha !
Val

Author's Reply:
We all know what Freud would say: sex, sex, sex. Perhaps trying to write something unusual is my mental aberration.
Luigi

Mikeverdi on 23-04-2014
Word Association
You always make me smile Luigi, keep it up!
Mike

Author's Reply:
Will follow your advice Mike. Many thanks.
Luigi


Le Jardin de ma Tante (posted on: 18-04-14)
Parlez-vous Franglais?

There exists a French garden ΰ ma tante de l'Angleterre where she grows haricots verts, courgettes and pommes de terre, des aubergines for ratatouille, Brussels sprouts and garlic too. All the vegetables from the soil did not cost a single sou. If you want to see the plot she will give you a grand tour, then she'll offer some fromage and a bowl of potage du jour. But something is not French: her traditional English fraises. They are sweet and succulent and have received a lot of praise. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Le Jardin de ma Tante
QBall on 18-04-2014
Le Jardin de ma Tante
Scrambled golden egg pour vous!
Cheers
Les Q.

Author's Reply:
So, do we share? Thanks Les.

sweetwater on 19-04-2014
Le Jardin de ma Tante
Very clever. Enjoyed this. Sue.

Author's Reply:
Thanks Sue. Appreciated.
Luigi

Andrea on 19-04-2014
Le Jardin de ma Tante
Nice one, Luigi - love the new pic, too - trΓ¨s suave πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
The challenge that e-griff set - A French Garden - reminded me me of the first French sentence I learned: 'J'ai perdu ma plume dans le jardin de ma tante' and that inspired me to write the poem in this style.
Luigi x

P.S. I think it worked better than my attempt at posting a photo!

Bozzz on 20-04-2014
Le Jardin de ma Tante
Manger Franglais? - c'est pour les autres. Allez bien. Il faut fermez ma bouche - toute suite. Ici UKA, mais eventuellement nous serons d'Europe. Defendu d'ecrire en Anglais?

Author's Reply:
Non, il n'est pas interdit; zut, ce que je peux faire Γ  la place? I suppose I can always revert to English.
Yours in fun.
Luigi

Pronto on 20-04-2014
Le Jardin de ma Tante
Nice one Luigi,
Even my French brother-in-law would understand it (He always pretends he doesn't understand a word of French spoken by the English) Very witty sirrah!

Author's Reply:
Sorry for the late reply, Pronto, got delayed by the snooker on the telly.
There is a difference between spoken and written French; I wonder if your brother-in-law would understand my pronunciation. C'est la vie!

pdemitchell on 22-04-2014
Le Jardin de ma Tante
Charming and witty as ever. Un mot d'esprit unique vaut un million de clichΓ©s! Onwards and tangentially upwards! Mitch πŸ˜‰

Author's Reply:
Mercy beaucoup, monsieur Mitch. J'espΓ¨re que vous Γͺtes bien.
Louis MMXIV (le roi sans soleil).


Transformation (posted on: 14-04-14)
A dystopian view.

All has been revealed now that the die is cast. Humans are obsolete and part of the past. Inflatable replicas will instead be used with penises and vaginas so we don't get confused. I've seen many summers arrive and then depart when Ann's paraphernalia titillated our heart Of the recent existence there won't be any trace; once changes occur it will be a new race. Clones or carbon copies, call them what you will. There won't be any need for the morning-after pill as sex will not take place according to the norm but intercourse will happen only in a virtual form. The world as we knew it we will never regain and it wouldn't do any good going down memory lane. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Transformation
Mikeverdi on 14-04-2014
Transformation
Best shoot me now then πŸ™‚
Mike

Author's Reply:
Your wish is our command, Mike. You'll be shot at dawn.

Bozzz on 14-04-2014
Transformation
A cracker, Luigi - ingenuity, elegant horror and oh so true. What was once cyber love has come to haunt us. Whatever happened to masturbation?

Author's Reply:
In answer to your question, David, masturbation was considered a far too vulgar 'manual labour', to be replaced by mechanisation. I am afraid that we have to adapt to the times.
Cheers.


Birds (posted on: 14-04-14)
Seasonal migration.

Patiently waiting on telephone wires, they will soon leave these wintry shires. We don't need to be told by word of mouth that most of them will be going south. It is something that we intuitively learn observing the flight of the Arctic Tern or watching a flock of Barnacle Geese migrating in unison with apparent ease. Some of the birds will travel long distance, like the osprey, or fish-hawk, for instance. Miles upon miles without taking a rest takes its toll and the birds are distressed. A layman like me might be tempted to ask why they undertake such a perilous task. Feeding and breeding is their motivation and that is why they embark on migration. They instinctively know what suits them best; whether to settle or return to their nest. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Birds
Pelequin23 on 14-04-2014
Birds
the wonders of nature I remember watching the birds migrating when I was young in awe

Author's Reply:
Nature is indeed wonderful, Pelenquin, and bird migration is fantastic to behold.

Mikeverdi on 14-04-2014
Birds
I love the TV program's showing this phenominum, as a child there were clouds of starlings doing acrobatics; don't see them as much now. I enjoyed this Luigi, thanks for posting.
Mike

Author's Reply:
And I enjoyed writing it, Mike. Thanks for reading and commenting.
Luigi

Bozzz on 14-04-2014
Birds
Lucky devil - the only migrations we see are tired loads of holiday makers struggling back from Devon and Cornwall through Dorset to London or vice versa. The Police regard the county as one of passage - roads through are sacred. Three years ago nearby we had a Montagu's harrier nesting in an open field - half the world's birders arrived, Sadly the next year the male did arrive - love or lead shot - we shall never know. Thanks, Luigi.... In envy...David

Author's Reply:
"love or lead shot", you say. It is a hazard that they face, David. There just as many birds that make it through the perilous journey as those who succumb. The human migration on the other hand seems to go on withouth hindrance.
Thanks for reading and commenting.

Kipper on 15-04-2014
Birds
Watching the wild life is an absorbing and never ending pleasure, for us if not for them, and nicely captured in you're verses. But one wonders if, while we are watching them, is someone watching us?
Michael

Author's Reply:
I am sure that birds watch us too, Michael. There is a cheeky robin lookink at me when I am digging as if to say "Hurry up and dig up some juicy worms." Then there is the blackbird coming to our kitchen step waiting for seeds.

ValDohren on 16-04-2014
Birds
Lovely write Luigi - I love birds, amazing creatures, and what a sad planet it would be without them.
Val

Author's Reply:
Thanks for the compliment, Val. Birds are part of the rich tapestry of nature and we wouldn't be without them.
Luigi


Sham (posted on: 11-04-14)
Idle thoughts.

It is said that smoking, -a fact worth noting- will make someone ill and ultimately kill. So it must be a sham to claim Parma ham was cured by smoke. Or is it a joke? © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Sham
expat on 11-04-2014
Sham
Smoking apparently cures kippers as well.
Another little gem by the James Coburn of UKA. πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
So it does! Why was it banned then?
Thanks for the kind comment.

Luigi πŸ™‚

Mikeverdi on 11-04-2014
Sham
And also Salmon....is there something fishy going on? Just like you to 'ham it up' πŸ™‚

Another Gem indeed Luigi
Mike

Author's Reply:
Very fishy indeed that so many things are dependant on smoke, Mike. As for hamming it up, I have to as I was the one bringing home the bacon.

Bozzz on 11-04-2014
Sham
Used to live in Totnes, Devon. There is a bacon factory. The locals call it the Pig's Hospital. They go in healthy and come out cured. Oh dear, so sad. Love your more powerful twist too. David

Author's Reply:
They are such wits those locals, David, to come up with quips so ovious that even I can think of it. Except that mine is in a rhyme.
Saluti, Luigi.


A Magic Cube (posted on: 07-04-14)
An alternative solution.

In 1974 there were many toys some for girls, others for boys. Then along came a Magic cube that wasn't intended for a rube. It was clever but it wasn't magic; to solve it, I needed twisted logic. Being a diabolical invention, it caused a great deal of tension. I felt that soon I'd have it nailed but despite many tries I failed. I was not yet ready for defeat so I decided to become a cheat and to get rid of my frustration I went and bought a publication that gave me the entire solution. That was my whole contribution. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for A Magic Cube
Mikeverdi on 07-04-2014
A Magic Cube
And why not...Ha Ha! I never even tried it πŸ™‚
Mike

Author's Reply:
I try anything once, Mike.
Luigi-:)

Kipper on 07-04-2014
A Magic Cube
I tried it.
Many times.
Never got it right.
Not Once.
Never!
No, that damned cube was never my favourite game, and I think you have told me why.
Thanks, Michael

Author's Reply:
It's easy when you know how.

Bozzz on 08-04-2014
A Magic Cube
Good scientists know where to look.
You found the answer in a book.
Objective achieved.
The world saved.
Iconic you, Iconicus
Yrs as ever...David


Author's Reply:
Thinking out of the box (or should it be the cube?). Why making things difficult?
Cheers.

QBall on 08-04-2014
A Magic Cube
Twisting and turning that damn creation gave you the expertise to knead dough!
Frustration ain't the word!
Les Q.

Author's Reply:
Well, at least you should be perfect at making bread, Les.

ValDohren on 10-04-2014
A Magic Cube
Never cracked it either, other than against the wall. Very good Luigi.
Val

Author's Reply:
Sorry for the late reply, Val. Just noticed your comment.
Where there is a will there is a way and mine was a bit devious. Thanks for the read.
Luigi x


Sacco and Vanzetti – a Cause Cιlθbre (posted on: 04-04-14)
Massachusett 1920s - The lawless and the Law. (An edited version of my entry to the weekly challenge.)

On April the 15th Nineteen-twenty a robbery and a murder took place. Two payroll guards were shot; of the killers there was no trace. A hunt for the culprits was started, foreign-born radicals were sought; in the frantic mκlιe that followed Sacco and Vanzetti were caught. Anarchy was gaining ground, the whole nation was alarmed; the two adherents were stopped and found to be well armed. The authorities knew them well for their anarchic, extreme views, for urging indiscriminate violence, and for having a very short fuse. They spoke the language badly, and came from peasant stock; were arrested, tried and convicted: the public was numb with shock. The trials did prove to be farcical, the verdict that was rendered, unfair. The judge and the jury were biased, it was the chair for the hapless pair. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Sacco and Vanzetti – a Cause Cιlθbre
Pelequin23 on 06-04-2014
Sacco and Vanzetti – a Cause CΓ©lΓ¨bre
ah "justice" indeed

Author's Reply:
I'll say! Thanks for stopping by, Pelenquin.
Luigi


Showers and Sunny Spells (posted on: 31-03-14)
***

The weather forecast was clear: some showers and sunny spells. I won't go to the woods today to gather a bunch of bluebells. The paths will be rather muddy and slippery also under foot. I would have to wear wellies or waterproof walking boots. The flowers were meant for Mavis who said that I had been rude when I watched her sunbathing on her patio though she was nude. I explained it happened by chance and that it was done without malice. But her next move surprised me: she went and told her friend Alice. That girl used to be my girlfriend but it is a long time since we dated. She'd a holier-than-thou attitude; it was her righteousness I hated. The reason we split is well known, she was frigid, devoid of desire, I was passionate, perhaps oversexed, so my ardour was destined to expire. She consorted mostly with spinsters, you could say that they were a coven. She's still single but no longer pious, it is evident from her bun in the oven. Likes to gossip and is very dangerous -like a ticking unexploded bomb- and soon she'll tell the whole world: in our midst there's a Peeping Tom. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Showers and Sunny Spells
barenib on 31-03-2014
Showers and Sunny Spells
Lovely Luigi, another of your smiles to start the week! John.

Author's Reply:
Thanks John. I was about to reply when I realised that the first stanza was missing. Restored now to its original version. Enjoy.

Luigi -:)

Mikeverdi on 31-03-2014
Showers and Sunny Spells
Ha Ha Ha! just what I needed on a Monday, thanks for that Luigi.
Mike

Author's Reply:
My thanks to you, Mike, for reading and commenting. Cheers.

pommer on 31-03-2014
Showers and Sunny Spells
Hi Luigi, perfetto.I had a good laugh.They say still waters are deep. be lucky, Peter

Author's Reply:
Much obliged to you, Peter. Thanks.

QBall on 02-04-2014
Showers and Sunny Spells
AS big thumbs up, Luigi.
Les Q.

Author's Reply:
So glad you liked it, Les. Thanks for letting me know.

Luigi πŸ™‚

pdemitchell on 03-04-2014
Showers and Sunny Spells
Another hunmurous ode, Luigi. I must try some humour one day! You never know. Mitch πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
And you would do it superbly, Mitch. Join the light(er) brigade.
Cheers, Luigi


Life Is Like A Rubik Cube (posted on: 31-03-14)
***

Life is like a Rubik cube for some. Multifaceted, full of complicated problems that they will overcome only if they are totally dedicated. At times they might try too hard to arrive at an apposite solution then find they are caught off guard by events that add to the confusion. They mustn't give up but try again and may glimpse the path to take. It is essential that one remains sane in order to be rewarded with a break. Hopelessness and despair may set in to the point of being physically sick but hang there and take it on the chin, the realisation will suddenly click. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Life Is Like A Rubik Cube
pommer on 31-03-2014
Life Is Like A Rubik Cube
I share the optimism expressed. Never give up in life.My mother used to say:Never despair.I f confronted by a difficulty always tell yourself :I will.It worked for me. A good poem, thank you for sharing Luigi. Peter

Author's Reply:
Many thanks, Peter.


Anniversary (posted on: 28-03-14)
48 and counting. An acrostic poem.

 photo Happyanniversary_zps8a583117.jpg Arrange a big party and send out invitations Notify your friends of the place you booked, No one, no matter what, should be overlooked; Invite all your relatives to join the celebrations. Visitors from distant lands one rarely meets, Except at christenings, weddings, and funerals, Return because they feel that it's only natural Sharing and participating in the festive treats. Acknowledge the part your partner played, Reflect on your married life's ups and downs Yet you always loved, honoured and obeyed. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Anniversary
pommer on 28-03-2014
Anniversary
Congratulations Luigi,A good arrangement.Don't forget the bouquet.
Peter.

Author's Reply:
Thanks Peter. It's the thought that counts.
Luigi

Bozzz on 29-03-2014
Anniversary
Did you say "obeyed, Luigi, friend. Are we still in Italy? Or even Mortimershire. There must be some subtle reasoning here - stirring up the feminists again. You do live on the edge, young man...written in jealousy as ever....David
Six is a bit mean

Author's Reply:
It definitely Mortimer country, David. I am a follower of Rumpole and accept his dictum: 'she who must obeyed'. The feminists have nothing to fear, I am their humble servant.
Six is a pass mark but I thank you for upping the rating.
Best, Luigi


Page Turners (posted on: 24-03-14)
A literary pastiche

The thief who stole The Moonstone was, we think, The Woman in White and we reckon that she had acted alone but don't know if this theory is right. Having fled, Gone with the Wind, she has been seen in Mansfield Park in whose ground is a huge tamarind that is dying and shedding its bark. They searched The Mill on the Floss and looked in Uncle Tom's Cabin but were puzzled, perplexed, at a loss to understand why she wasn't within. There remained Great Expectations that the diamond had come to no harm, that it was hidden in a railway station or under straw, in an Animal Farm. It was Much Ado About Nothing; it re-emerged during a birthday party, and perhaps it is time to stop hunting. Once again our laugh will be hearty © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Page Turners
Mikeverdi on 24-03-2014
Page Turners
Have a Hearty laugh from me Luigi, was that Abigail's Party?
Mike

Author's Reply:
It could well have been, Mike, but I don't recall many laughs in that play.
Cheers.

Andrea on 24-03-2014
Page Turners
Nice one, Luigi πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Thanks, Andrea.
Luigi x


The End of the Affair (posted on: 21-03-14)
My entry to this week's Prose and Poetry Challenge

It was with anticipation that I stood on platform 2 of Piccadilly station: I was expecting you. All the passengers alighted from the London Train. I would've been delighted to see you once again. But it was not to be and I shoulder the blame. You learnt I wasn't free, that's why you never came. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for The End of the Affair
jdm4454 on 21-03-2014
The End of the Affair
Good for her!! Ha, great read, Luigi. A little levity at one's own expense is good for the soul. thanks for the read. jim

Author's Reply:
Thanks for the comment, Jim. You will have gathered that the poem is not autobiographical. I would never dream of treating a lady in such underhand manner and my sympathies are with the wronged woman.
Cheers, Luigi

Mikeverdi on 22-03-2014
The End of the Affair
Ha Ha! another entertaining read Luigi.
Mike

Author's Reply:
Thanks Mike. This is the best I could do with a 12-lines limit but it got me the coveted Golden Egg.
Cheers, Luigi.

Nemo on 23-03-2014
The End of the Affair
One from the Proper Poem category. Advanced critique doesn't apply. Chapeau.
Gerald.

Author's Reply:
I am relieved that it doesn't come from the Pompous Poem category, Gerald. As for advanced critique, do I look bovvered?
Je lève mon chapeau à vous. Merci.
Luigi

jdm4454 on 23-03-2014
The End of the Affair
Luigi -- I was referring to my own soul, for I have been in my life, not near so chivalrous as you.... ;^)

Author's Reply:
I seem to have misunderstood your comment, Jim. As for chivalry, sometimes women's interpretation of it differs from a male perspective. I have always prided myself on being a sensitive and considerate person and yet I have been described as callous and lacking in feelings. So don't be too hard on yourself.
Kind regards, Luigi


A Rebel with Many Causes (posted on: 21-03-14)
Remembering Tony Benn.

I saw him in Manchester. He was on the stage to talk about his life, recorded in his diary that was on sale outside in the theatre's foyer. An armchair and a table were some of his props together with a pipe - unlit, for safety reasons - a cup and a teapot on which rested a cosy. On this domestic scene he spoke of his affinity with the Mancunian region when a serving officer in the Royal Air Force. He gave a left-wing view of socialist democracy, the threat of global economy, of environmental issues and the perils of capitalism. He was a man of the people who resigned from Parliament to concentrate on politics. That's what he said and meant. He argued against conflicts saying that war represents a failure of diplomacy. He fought against colleagues as well as his enemies; he was a rebel with many causes, the like of which we'll see no more. R.I.P. © Luigi Pagano 2014 *Also published on Poetry24 - 17th March 2014.*
Archived comments for A Rebel with Many Causes
Mikeverdi on 21-03-2014
A Rebel with Many Causes
He was all of the things you have so eloquently written, he will be missed by many; but not by me. Mike

Author's Reply:
Love him or loathe him, Mike, he left his mark on the political scene. During his lifetime many disagreed with his ideology but he remained true to his beliefs.
Luigi

pdemitchell on 21-03-2014
A Rebel with Many Causes
A true giant of oratory sadly lacking in these sound-bite twittering times. Mitch

Author's Reply:
A sound observation, Mitch.
Regards, Luigi

jdm4454 on 21-03-2014
A Rebel with Many Causes
Don't know him, but he sounds llike my kind of guy! He sounds comparatively speaking to FDR's VP - Henry Wallace. A liberal who spoke what he stood for and stood for what he spoke.
Good job, luigi. jim

Author's Reply:
He was a left-wing socialist politician, Jim. Benn inherited a hereditary peerage on his father's death (as 2nd Viscount Stansgate), preventing him continuing as an MP. He fought to remain in the House of Commons, and then campaigned for the ability to renounce the title, a campaign which succeeded with the Peerage Act 1963.
Although opposed by many, including people from his own party, he remained true to his principles. An anti-war campaigner he opposed the Iraq conflict.
Thanks for reading, Luigi

Bozzz on 21-03-2014
A Rebel with Many Causes
I support your friendly well put view if the man, Luigi. Simple argument and fierce logic were his forte. lack of a technical background his weakness. I did clash with him in a technical committee when he was in Government responsible for the Post Office. Commented that his intended statement to a conference was rather too verbose. One of his minions was detailed to put me down "The Minister will be succinct as usual". hA hA.
Cheers, David

Author's Reply:
Dear David, you don't seriously think that politicians have a technical background? If they had there wouldn't be so many reshuffles. How can we explain switching one minister from, say, Agriculture to Culture or Technology? The 'brains' behind them are civil servants and all that remains to the Minister is to be verbose or as you put it 'succinct as usual'.
Luigi

Popeye on 23-03-2014
A Rebel with Many Causes
A fine tribute Luigi, he stood out from the crowd because he was uncompromising when it came to matters of principle.
I can't think of many who fit that description in parliament today.

Author's Reply:
Absolutely, Popeye, how right you are. Sentiments shared by many.
Best, Luigi


Holy Cow! (posted on: 17-03-14)
It is rhyme but not as we know it.

A legend says that William wrote ''I wandered lonely as a cow'' but that didn't get Dorothy's vote. I wonder whether they had a row. Did they argue throughout the night, and did her voice grow very loud until her brother got the verse right? The noun changed from cow to cloud. A wrong word would be precarious. From what I have read and also heard cows aren't lonely, they are gregarious: they are quite happy in a large herd. But maybe the legend is utter nonsense and he never used the rogue expression, so the readers should note its absence and accept the poem without a question. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Holy Cow!
Nemo on 18-03-2014
Holy Cow!
Nice. Did you know Larkin first wrote 'They tuck you in, your mum and dad'?
Gerald.

Author's Reply:
Everybody knows that, Gerald, but it's not a well known fact that he wrote it while at nursery school!
Best, Luigi.


Guilty Until Proven Innocent (posted on: 17-03-14)
US man walks free after 25 years on death row.

You have been found guilty of an horrendous crime by a jury of twelve just men and you will serve some time languishing on death row, before the lethal needle and nothing anyone can do no matter how they wheedle. This is what the judge said at the end of the trial when he listened to the verdict of the jury of twelve white men. But the colour of your skin was not of the same hue and so the right to justice did not apply to you. You were not at the scene of the alleged offence but the fact was not pursued by an incompetent defence. The whole trial was shambolic, it was a catalogue of errors; there were false witnesses and twelve prejudiced jurors. Now they've got new evidence and you left the penitentiary but you endured hell on earth for a quarter of a century. As you start your life afresh you'll forget the bitter tears. They will give compensation but can't give you the lost years. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Guilty Until Proven Innocent
jdm4454 on 17-03-2014
Guilty Until Proven Innocent
I read about that....sheesh...all the money in the world can never buy the lost years...that is really good, Luigi. Just like "Law and Order" TV show..."snatched from the headlines" stories...thanks for the read. jim

Author's Reply:
It was indeed inspired by a newspaper headline, Jim, and I was flabbergasted that it took so long to rectify such a miscarriage of justice. I am much obliged to you for reading and commenting.
Luigi

Popeye on 19-03-2014
Guilty Until Proven Innocent
Nice work Luigi, how many have gone to their grave in similar circumstances.

Author's Reply:
Thanks for your comment, Davy. You are not new to this site, are you? I seem to remember the pseudonym Popeye.
Cheers, Luigi

pommer on 19-03-2014
Guilty Until Proven Innocent
What a true well written picture of man's prejudice.Luigi.Just one observation,The last line of the third verse.Would a line finishing in terror been better? See what you think. A good write .Be lucky, Peter.

Author's Reply:
Thanks for your suggestion, Peter, and I agree that 'terror' would rhyme with 'errors' but the meaning of that line that points out the bias of the jury would be lost. It is good to see that you have read the poem and appreciated it. I welcome your feedback.
Best, Luigi


Southville Hop (posted on: 14-03-14)
A chaser is not out of the question.

In Southville the main crop is hop. Its flowers are used to make beer, a beverage you won't find in a shop as it is drunk right away over here. It's the hops that give it its flavour but anyone who is worth his salt knows that he'll be out of favour should he choose to omit the malt. It isn't light and it is just as risky as imbibing that other strong brew, the one that we've labelled whisky that we find very hard to eschew. Sometimes, when we drink a shot, a chaser is not out of the question; we fool ourselves that it isn't a lot and reject any other suggestion. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Southville Hop
jdm4454 on 14-03-2014
Southville Hop
...in the states we call that a "whiskey with a beer back"... Me? I'm a tequila man...with a beer chaser-----ha! Thanks for posting, Luigi...very enjoyable. jim

Author's Reply:
It is the same everywhere we go, Jim. A drink doesn't seem complete without a chaser, whatever we like to call it. Thanks for reading this effort of mine.

Luigi

Kat on 14-03-2014
Southville Hop
I enjoyed this wry/rye? Luigi-style poem.

Kat x

Author's Reply:
Rye? Definitely. Thanks Kat, mine is a double. Nice to hear from you.

Luigi x

Mikeverdi on 15-03-2014
Southville Hop
Very witty as usual Luigi :). I picked hops in the sixties just outside of Maidstone in Kent; a village called Headcorn.
Mike

Author's Reply:
Hi Mike. You are the second person mentioning hop-picking in Kent. Apparently her mother hated it.

Regards, Luigi

pdemitchell on 15-03-2014
Southville Hop
Benjamin Franklin once said "Beer is living proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy."

Author's Reply:
I knew that Benjamin was a wise man whose words I cannot dispute, Mitch.
Besides bringing happiness, it was safer drinking beer than water in medieval times.

Cheers, Luigi


Time To Say Goodbye (posted on: 10-03-14)
***

I asked myself if I had any right to pry, to enquire as to why I thought she may lie. Was there another guy? Would she say 'Aye' or would she deny? Looked at her in the eye, she made no reply. She'd never been shy, nor was she prone to cry - her pupils were dry - but I knew she was sly. I looked up to the sky and I heaved a sigh, it was useless to try. Time to say goodbye and our knot to untie with a decree nisi. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Time To Say Goodbye
Mikeverdi on 10-03-2014
Time To Say Goodbye
Been there, done that...twice. Not doing it again, I've found a keeper this time around. πŸ™‚
Mike

Author's Reply:
Pleased that you are once again happy, Mike. Congratulations.
The scenario I am presenting is completely fictitious; it is simply an experiment of a poem with a single rhyme.

Luigi

ChairmanWow on 11-03-2014
Time To Say Goodbye
turns out one rhyme can get the job done.

Author's Reply:
Yes Ralph, it seems to work. Nice to hear from you. Thanks for stopping by.

Luigi

CVaughan on 12-03-2014
Time To Say Goodbye
I get it and they all rhyme with Luigeye, sorry about that. I've flirted with some mono-rhymed poetry and 'taint easy' but you winged it and I enjoyed this, good job. Frank

Author's Reply:
Dear Frank, thanks for your comment. I normally rhyme Luigi with squeegee. I agree that mono-rhymed poetry is not easy but I always try anything once.

Cheers, Luigi

Nemo on 12-03-2014
Time To Say Goodbye
A clever experiment, Luigi. You'll go far.
Gerald.

Author's Reply:
Thanks Gerald. The only way I'll go far is if I become a postman but given my age it is doubtful I would get employment in that capacity.

Best, Luigi

jdm4454 on 12-03-2014
Time To Say Goodbye
so good
understood
he would
she could
too much wood

that is so very clever -- I love that...........jim

Author's Reply:
Thanks, Jim, for your feedback.

Luigi

jdm4454 on 12-03-2014
Time To Say Goodbye
......and it is not easy, Luigi. I've been fooling around with your single rhyme scheme. It looks so simple, almost sophomoric, but it is hard to make any sense trying to ryhme every line. Awesome job, Luigi...awesome

Author's Reply:
I agree that it is more difficult than it looks, Jim, but this example seems to have clicked. Beginners' luck, perhaps.

Best, Luigi


Spring Fever (posted on: 07-03-14)
My entry to this week's Prose and Poetry Challenge

I no longer meet with my friend Trish but we regularly speak on the phone. When I first knew her it was her wish to live with me, yet now she has flown. To me it meant more than just a fling, it was the all pervading warm sensation that occurs at the beginning of spring and generates a great feeling of elation. A powerful sentiment that I call love, whilst others, perversely, say it is lust. It makes us sigh at the moonlight above as all considerate lovers surely must. It is in spring that the philomel will sing and that new buds burgeon on shrubs; it is the time for pupae to spread wings and for Panthera leo to rear her cubs. We never took advantage of that season. Instead of accepting to become my wife she just upped and left without a reason. Obviously needing a more exciting life. Now we talk and gossip on the blower but we avoid any mention of the affair; though my infatuation is still not over I just pretend that I no longer care. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Spring Fever
Bozzz on 07-03-2014
Spring Fever
Luigi, so glad to hear that passion is not entirely spent. Something that never entirely disappears - magic. Such good rhyming to match. Excellent poem my friend.

Author's Reply:
Thanks for this, David, a real tonic.

Luigi:-)


The Little Dove (posted on: 03-03-14)
An old one. Re-posted.

Within the Commedia dell'Arte you can spot, if you are observant, one character called Columbine. She is a comic domestic servant who's married to Pierrot the clown but is also Harlequin's mistress. She mirrors his diamond motley with patches in her ragged dress. Concocting many impudent plots she's shrewd and a devious schemer, but she's got her feet on the ground and is not what you'd call a dreamer. Men think that she is a loose woman and they lust after her and swoon, especially that amorous old lecher who's known by the name Pantaloon. Because of her heavy makeup she is said to be a shameless tart but regardless of her rough apparel our servant is a romantic at heart. Her efforts in helping two lovers by smoothing the course of true love typifies the name she was given: Columbine means little dove. © Luigi Pagano
Archived comments for The Little Dove
Tasha-ann on 04-03-2014
The Little Dove
I like this too... πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Truly thankful Tasha.

Luigi

ValDohren on 04-03-2014
The Little Dove
Sweet little tale Luigi - well penned.
Val x

Author's Reply:
Glad you liked it. Thanks.

Luigi x

Leila on 05-03-2014
The Little Dove
ah, nicely penned as ever Luigi...Leila

Author's Reply:
Cheers. thumbs up emoticon photo: emoticon thumb thumbs_up_bci.jpg


Lawrence (posted on: 28-02-14)
A complex character.

I saw the film ''Lawrence of Arabia'' at a matinιe in Leicester Square; that viewing was a low-key affair unlike the razzmatazz of the premiere. It is the biopic of a complex character, whose motivation is still an enigma. After an encounter with the Turkish Bey, sodomised, he's haunted by the stigma. He is a misfit British Army lieutenant who's sent to assess the likely prospect of an alliance with Arabs against Turkey but his subsequent deeds are more direct. He embraces the cause of Prince Faisal, proposes to seize Aqaba with fifty men and crosses the Nefud Desert with them; all throughout he displays great acumen. The heat of the desert proves exhausting and oases are far from the beaten track. During the journey one of the men is lost but Lawrence, valiantly, brings him back. He entered Damascus ahead of Allenby and handed it to the Arabs on a plate; but the tribes were ill suited to the task: self-determination was not to be their fate. Although his exploits made him famous in the end he failed to achieve his aim. The Arab council constantly bickered and enabled the Brits to stake their claim. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Lawrence
Bozzz on 01-03-2014
Lawrence
History in rhymic form : "Hengist and Horsa landed in Kent" style, has great potential for helping to pass exams. Not sure if modern events are so amenable - far more difficult because some of us already know a little, but not the whole story. Luigi this is a bold entry and deserves applause for courage. Not certain what friend Gove will say, but who cares about that Noddy character gone wrong anyway. Loved it ....David

Author's Reply:
Yes David I suppose that this kind of poem could be used as an aide-mΓ©moire in exams but no serious student is going to prepare for a history test by reading Ionicus's verses, is he? He (Ionicus) readily admits that his work is not aimed at Academia.
Any historical event, whether ancient or modern, has the potential to inspire interesting and informative poetry. A few of my poems have included historical figures and description of their good or evil deeds.
Glad you read it and the fact you liked it is a bonus.

Luigi πŸ™‚

Andrea on 01-03-2014
Lawrence
Loved that movie, Luigi. Peter O'Toole looked remarkably like the 'real guy' Did you read The Seven Pillars of Wisdom'? A complicated (but fascinating) character indeed.

Author's Reply:
Yes Andrea, the resemblance was uncanny. Apparently other actors turned down the part.
No I haven't read The Seven Pillars of wisdom yet; it is on my 'wanting to read' list but so are many other books. I don't seem to find enough time.

Luigi xxx

ValDohren on 02-03-2014
Lawrence
Have seen the film, but too many years ago to remember. You have put the story into rhyme - very clever Luigi. Well penned.
Val x

Author's Reply:
Trying to do something different, Val. Thanks for reading.

Luigi x

Mikeverdi on 03-03-2014
Lawrence
Excellent! Have seen the film many times and read a few books, Laurence flew from Mt Batton in Plymouth (my town) in flying boats, everything around there is named after him; it's where I walk my dogs so I see him every day πŸ™‚
Mike

Author's Reply:
Nice to be surrounded by history, Mike. I wasn't aware of the geographical connection and thank you for the information.

Luigi πŸ™‚


The Ring of Confidence (posted on: 24-02-14)
Reader, he married her.

''It's the ring of confidence'' declared her uncle Bert but he was being facetious and quoting an advert. ''She got her man at last'', that's what he meant to say as she couldn't stop smiling on a jubilant wedding day. The groom could dismiss the old man's reference because the real reason had much more relevance. He had serious intentions, it wasn't simply a whim; it was those pearly whites that had attracted him. They were a perfect match for her immaculate gown and the white headband was worn like a crown. It was a dream wedding but to him it was a blur and still couldn't believe he'd just married her. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for The Ring of Confidence
Leila on 24-02-2014
The Ring of Confidence
ha ha nice one Luigi...Leila

Author's Reply:
He actually said that, Leila. He was always coming up with some quips.

Luigi x

jdm4454 on 26-02-2014
The Ring of Confidence
This is so well written, Ionicus. I love the effortlessness of your abcb rhyme...jim

Author's Reply:
Glad you liked this piece, Jim, and pleased about your appreciative comment. It is loosely based on my own wedding, many, many years ago.

Regards, Luigi


Grandson (posted on: 24-02-14)
It's a boy!

 photo itsaboy_zpsa8062e3b.jpg Our grandson has arrived but he has made us wait. We were getting fidgety because he was late. Like all grandparents we think that he's unique yet he's like other babies regarding his physique: ten fingers and ten toes, a face resembling Winston, bald head and snub nose. In the arms of his mother he looks very comfortable; the picture of contentment, he is absolutely adorable. You may not understand and might be asking why we tell everyone that he's the apple of our eye. I better stop enthusing or I'll burst with pride. If my style is hyperbolic is for you to decide. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Grandson
Bozzz on 24-02-2014
Grandson
There is, in everyone of us, a grain of dynastic pride. Who are we to deny our friend a modest hyperbole or two. We need a few more Winstons - if only to up our whisky consumption ! Bravo Luigi, I say.....David

Author's Reply:
What would we be without dynastic pride, David. Only whisky consumption? He was also a cigar smoker but I suppose that smoking is now politically incorrect and mustn't be mentioned. THanks for allowing me a modest hyperbole.

Cheers, Luigi

barenib on 24-02-2014
Grandson
Many congratulations Luigi, and you made me smile as usual with your poem too! John.

Author's Reply:
Thanks John. Having recently come back from visiting the newborn I have to revise my assessment: he doesn't have a bald head and doesn't look anything like Winston.

franciman on 24-02-2014
Grandson
Congratulations Grandad!
There truly is no feeling like it and you sum that up wonderfully in your verse Luigi.
cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
So true Jim, the feeling is exhilarating; it is similar to what I experienced at the birth of my two daughters but this time it's only by proxy.

Best, Luigi

Leila on 24-02-2014
Grandson
A hearty welcome to the newborn, written with pride, it gave me a smile...Leila

Author's Reply:
Thank you for your kind words, Leila. Just a few light verses from an old softie to express his joyous feelings.

Luigi x

pommer on 24-02-2014
Grandson
Prego to the new born.Congratulations Luigi from a great-grandfather.It is a wonderful feeling I felt the same every time.Peter.

Author's Reply:
Thanks for the congratulations, Peter. Great-grandfather, eh? Wow!

Nemo on 25-02-2014
Grandson
You capture it well, Luigi. I've known the feeling four times over, the eldest is sixteen!
Gerald

Author's Reply:
Thanks Gerald, for me it is a new experience after a long wait.

Luigi πŸ™‚


Decisions (posted on: 21-02-14)
To boldly go.

Let's go to the 'King's Head', someone said. It may have been the wife and it made sense. What better place to go to than that sanctum sanctorum, the snug, to make decisions which are part and parcel of life? Cocooned from the raging wind buffeting the countryside we sat by a roaring log fire quaffing large quantities of ale and forgot the quagmire. Our thoughts turned instead to foreign shores, to places such as Italy and Spain that might provide relief from the incessant rain. Then gradually, and boldly, we expanded our horizons and dreamt of exotic holidays: exploring the jungle of Borneo, diving from the cliffs at La Quebrada, riding bareback in a rodeo or visiting the deserts of Nevada. We studied the atlas at length and finally reached a consensus: the location that received top mark was none other than our local park. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Decisions
ifyouplease on 21-02-2014
Decisions
Very nice Luigi, same here. Nothing like the local park which we owe to a visionary politician Antonis Tritsis, who died too young I think, just 55.

X

Author's Reply:
Lovely to hear from you Nicoletta. Just a quick thank you as I am off to see my newborn grandson.

Luigi. x

ValDohren on 21-02-2014
Decisions
A lot cheaper too Luigi - and better one's own bed. Very good, enjoyed reading.
Val x

Author's Reply:
It is the accepted wisdom of 'home, sweet home' and, as you rightly say, cheaper too.

Luigi x

Leila on 22-02-2014
Decisions
Luigi you are a star, another gem...Leila

Author's Reply:
And you are a star commenter, Leila. Thanks for your kind response.

Luigi x

Texasgreg on 24-02-2014
Decisions
Aye! to borrow a phrase from Dorothy, "There's no place like home." Though travel is fun and the imagination sometimes causes you to believe the grass is greener elsewhere, I too prefer my own bed.

Greg πŸ™‚

 photo Gunspincowboy.gif



Author's Reply:
Wise man, Greg. I have visited a few places but am by no means an adventurer yearning to have exotic and challenging holidays. I have actually been to Acapulco and seen the divers at La Quebrada but my thought was 'rather you than me, pal'.

Luigi πŸ™‚


Nothing But The Best (posted on: 17-02-14)
Luxury travel.

Whether my destination is Norway or Denmark I always make sure my holidays are hallmark. I may go to Istanbul, Hong Kong or Madras but on every occasion it has to be first class. A traveller like me, seasoned and debonair, has to choose locations with diligence and care. I learn about the places and know if it's judicious to go in the rainy season to the island of Mauritius. All my vacations vary; some on a golden beach others in remote areas that are difficult to reach. Not only am I refined, I'm also a good sport and as such I'd like to meet a girl in every port. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Nothing But The Best
barenib on 18-02-2014
Nothing But The Best
Definitely a man after my own heart! Great as always - John.

Author's Reply:
Thanks John, much obliged.
Cheers, Luigi

Andrea on 18-02-2014
Nothing But The Best
Haha, very nice, Luigi πŸ™‚ Debonair, eh?

Author's Reply:
OK, maybe not debonair. Can we settle on laid-back?

Luigi x

ifyouplease on 18-02-2014
Nothing But The Best
very luigical! nice..... xx

Author's Reply:
'luigical'. I like it, Nic. Thanks for coining a new term. You never know, it may end up in the Oxford dictionary like 'selfie' did.

Luigi xxx


Sub Judice (posted on: 14-02-14)
A vexed question.

The truth will out: am I the maverick who taught you how to write a limerick; how to appreciate a villanelle, a poetic form in which you excel or am I an abuser, a degenerate pervert? Of this you and others seem quite cert. But I also want people to listen to my side: that I shaped you cannot be denied. I introduced you to Keats and Yeats, to Byron and Shelley and the other Greats. You were attracted to anything exotic but then developed a passion for the erotic. My greatest aspiration was to make you a star but I realise now that it was a wish too far. Meanwhile I stand accused of sexual abuse. Are you seeking attention and this is just a ruse? We must not see things with clouded vision but let twelve just men reach their decision. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Sub Judice
Nemo on 15-02-2014
Sub Judice
We should not have to appeal to have our poems read but is something odd happening, fewer people using the site perhaps, people reading and not commenting, people afraid to comment, fewer people rating, poems receiving nibs but no comments, people having 'favourites' and by-passing others......? I am perplexed. Your fluid and witty poem turns news-selling scandal into art. I enjoyed it and I hope it gets the recognition it deserves. Regards, Gerald.

Author's Reply:
You are right on both counts Gerald. We should not have to resort to appeals to generate interest in our work - this being a writers' website, contributions should in my view be at least looked at - and there is, as you say, something odd happening. There are quite a few entries that have been neglected while others have been given more attention. Could the Winter Olympics being televised be responsible? I intend to have my usual trawl through the current entries shortly but in the meantime I thank you for your understanding words.
Best, Luigi

jdm4454 on 15-02-2014
Sub Judice
I really enjoyed the wit--- and being an English teacher, it rings a certain bell...
As far as the conversation...I was under the impression, as a "writer's" site, the idea was to throw out your work for critique and comment by kindred spirits working at an art form. And, as with all works of art, there are no specific rules per se`. I have publish poems that go back 40 years, and have been published as well in subsequent anthologies, and unless the compilations were chosen from existing copy by the publisher and approved by my agent, never, hardly ever, remain in their original form...everything evolves,

Author's Reply:
Hi jdm4454. The topic of this poem has been widely discussed in the press recently involving people from the teaching profession or from entertainment. Some have been convicted and others have been cleared by a jury, confirming the concept of being innocent until proven guilty.
As for the "writers' site", it is indeed a place where one's work can be showcased. Some authors prefer an in-depth critique whilst others are quite happy with simple comments.
Glad to hear that you have been successful with your publishing experience: long may it continue.
Regards, Luigi.


Rains (posted on: 14-02-14)
An acrostic poem.

Rivers have regurgitated onto the plains And imminent snow has been forecast I'm full of apprehension and downcast. No hope of drier spells and sun remains, So we must get accustomed to the pains. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Rains
Nemo on 15-02-2014
Rains
Neat and worth more comments.

Author's Reply:
Thanks Gerald.

Luigi πŸ™‚

CVaughan on 17-02-2014
Rains
Non-tropical but topical, could not resist. Someone had to write about it you did and well Luigi. FEG. (Frank)

Author's Reply:
Not tropical now but you never know how the climate change will behave. Thanks for your comment, Frank.

Andrea on 17-02-2014
Rains
Clever, Luigi!

Author's Reply:
Cheers, Andrea, and thanks.

Luigi x


The Best of Friends (posted on: 10-02-14)
Thanks but no thanks.

A tycoon from Hong Kong thought that he knew better but his daughter disagreed and said so in a letter. Told him her sexuality was one he should accept although the old magnate thought it an odd concept. He'd offered 40 millions to find one or two coves that Gigi Chao could marry and men arrived in droves. She wasn't a drama queen, nor acted like a thespian, but revealed a lot of gumption in saying she was a lesbian. She understood that her dad had her interests at heart yet did not think his actions were coherent or smart. She wed her female partner, was comfortable in her skin, but her old man believed they were committing sin. Only one hope remained, that all enmity would end; that the couple and father could still be best friends. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for The Best of Friends
Mikeverdi on 10-02-2014
The Best of Friends
I have friends caught up in this dilemma, it shouldn't be a problem but to some of us older traditionalists it still is. I will confess that although I would accept it, I would never condone it. Another thought provoking piece Luigi; excellent writing. Mike

Author's Reply:
Hi Mike. We must understand that over the years a lot of attitudes, some more controversial than others, have changed. I often read about concerns expressed on a variety of issue from homosexuality to female bishops and views differ depending on which side one is. You point out that older traditionalists find it difficult to adjust to such changes. It is indeed a factor to be taken into consideration as long as it does not lead to the kind of intolerance that has led to laws of discrimination being introduced.
Many thanks for responding to this piece.
Luigi

franciman on 10-02-2014
The Best of Friends
I enjoyed this Luigi. A very graceful way of taking a neutral position.
cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Quite true about the neutral position, Jim. I was simply reporting what the papers said but if pressed I'd say that I agree with Mrs Patrick Campbell: '...as long as it doesn't frighten the horses.'

Luigi

pommer on 10-02-2014
The Best of Friends
I have met many people in this very same situation.Like Mike, I am old fashioned ,and while being able to accept it, I don't think I could ever condone it.A good poem.

Author's Reply:
Point taken, pommer, I understand your concern.
Luigi

Andrea on 10-02-2014
The Best of Friends
I like your pome, Luigi. I read the article in question when it came out. Personally, I don't give a toss what people do behind closed doors, as long as they're not hurting anyone else. My next door neighbours are a lovely gay couple - A Clog and a Croatian, arty-farty girlies (photographer and sound engineer) who have noisy (but considerate)...er...gay parties in the garden in the summer - I'm hoping to get an invite this year πŸ™‚



Author's Reply:
Hi Andrea, I actually got an invite once. I lived on the second floor of a Victorian house in South Ken and on the ground floor lived a gay man. He organised a party but to hide its nature from the landlady he also invited lesbians couples from the club he frequented. I was naturally intrigued at how it would work out. I looked in and...no girls! Apparently they couldn't make it. I immediately retreated to the second floor, where, next door to me, lived a girl (hetero) with whom I had made an acquaintance but that is another story.

ValDohren on 11-02-2014
The Best of Friends
I can accept that some people are born with physical problems around sexuality, but there is far too much of it going on these days for it to be anything but a perversion. I am old fashioned too, and I definitely do not agree with gay marriage - it makes a mockery of what marriage is about. There, I've said it. It's a great poem Luigi, very well written.
Val

Author's Reply:
Without wanting to be facetious I remember Bob Dylan singing that 'the times they are a-changing' and since then many changes have occurred which have been met with differing opinions. It isn't just a matter of being old fashioned, in many case one's response is dictated by one's upbringing or religious belief. In any discussion I have been involved I never succeeded in altering the other person's mind. I think that people just have to agree to disagree and not let extreme intolerance prevail. You have stated your point of view, Val, and that has to be respected.

Regards, Luigi

pdemitchell on 11-02-2014
The Best of Friends
Love is love is love is love and all else is mere frippery! Nice and Sappho-sympathic ode. πŸ™‚ Mitch

Author's Reply:
Very philosophical, Mitch. Thanks for reading and commenting.

Luigi

P.S. I read that a poem by Sappho has recently been found. I never read anything by the lady, have you?
Cheers.

franciman on 12-02-2014
The Best of Friends
Sappho

The tragedy is not thy verse is lost.
'Tis that thy like was never seen again.
For man, who heaps upon himself
the Classics and Humanities,
And pours derision on the distaff mind;
Knows not thy verse, nor worth.
And thus in placing beauty on the pedestal;
Leaves women's genius lying in the dust

Author's Reply:
Thanks for this, Jim, very apt.

Luigi πŸ™‚


Ladri di Biciclette (posted on: 07-02-14)
Bicycle thieves.

He'd seen ''Bicycle Thieves'' and liked that film a lot; a neorealist masterpiece with an intricate plot. At the Odeon cinema there was a retrospective and seeing it once again would prove quite affective. It didn't take very long for him to decide: got a ticket and went in leaving the bike outside. He trusted people's honesty: no chain and no padlock. He came out and realised his mistake with a shock, his wheels had disappeared. His expression was stony when the penny dropped. He now travels on shank's pony. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for Ladri di Biciclette
franciman on 07-02-2014
Ladri di Biciclette
Luigi, sometimes you are priceless.
Your slightly skewed perspective tends to make sense of life.
I loved this.
cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Life itself is skewed nowadays, Jim, so by necessity my perspective has to be slanted. This poem was inspired by a true occurrence. It happened many years ago but it stuck in my memory.
Thanks for comment and rating.

Cheers, Luigi

Mikeverdi on 07-02-2014
Ladri di Biciclette
Always entertaining Luigi, I love reading the way you look at life. Mike

Author's Reply:
Hi Mike. Being a cynic I never look at life through rose-coloured glasses.

Best, Luigi

Andrea on 07-02-2014
Ladri di Biciclette
Haha - brilliant! Love it - and congrats on the nib πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Ta very much, Andrea, for your welcome feedback and my thanks to the nibber too.

Nemo on 08-02-2014
Ladri di Biciclette
Nice little poem, Luigi. Are familiar with 'Ladri di Saponnette'? Regards, Gerald.

Author's Reply:
I am aware of but not familiar with that parody of De Sica's masterpiece. The title, which in Italian rhymes with 'biciclette', was incorrectly translated into English as 'Icicle Thieves' as a pun of the word 'bicycle'. It must have been a good spoof as it won a prize at a Moscow festival in 1989.
Thanks for stopping by.

Luigi

pommer on 08-02-2014
Ladri di Biciclette
Great. love it. Pommer

Author's Reply:
Thank you, pommer.

Nomenklatura on 09-02-2014
Ladri di Biciclette
Ha... made me chuckle. The ironies of life are sometimes the salt on the beef.
Regards
Ewan

Author's Reply:
Some call it sod's law, Ewan, but I can't possibly comment.

Best, Luigi


In Praise of Winter (posted on: 27-01-14)
***

 photo c658b203-b8ac-45a6-897b-45b19a1abe32_zps024efc3e.jpg Some people have no poetry in their soul. They vilify the winter months as a season that's uninspiring; say it should be our goal to emigrate - if we haven't lost our reason - to warmer climes, at least for the duration. I can't stand anyone so blatantly philistine that they cannot show their appreciation for one aspect of Nature that's just fine. Who fails to enjoy the fall of pristine snow and the scope it offers to an expectant kid? A snowman will be built and put on show; down a slope on a sledge a child will skid; skaters will slide, and fall, on frozen lakes and people of all ages exchange snowballs. A virgin cover, caused by a cascade of flakes, will last, perhaps, until the spring's rainfalls. I shall ignore the detractors' dire monitions that the glacial months are doom and gloom and rather relish those hibernal conditions from inside my triple-glazed warm room. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for In Praise of Winter
Mikeverdi on 27-01-2014
In Praise of Winter
I think I will go with the last bit Luigi πŸ™‚ Although I do like the cold, I am sick to death of all the bloody rain we are getting. Mike

Author's Reply:
I know what you mean about the rain, Mike. Very depressing.
Even a picturesque winter scene is better viewed from inside as far as I'm concerned.

Luigi πŸ™‚

EmotiveSoul on 27-01-2014
In Praise of Winter
And before you know it, people will complain about the good weather too. πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Too true, Emotive Soul. You can't please all the people all the time.
Thanks for looking in and leaving a comment.

ValDohren on 28-01-2014
In Praise of Winter
Well, I do my fair share of moaning about the Winter, but a fall of snow is indeed a beautiful sight - its a joy to imprint those first footsteps too, but lovely to go back indoors where its warm, although the energy providers seem hell bent on undermining that little luxury with rising energy costs !!
A lovely and inspired write Luigi - enjoyed.
Val

Author's Reply:
As you rightly say, Val, the energy companies are determined to spoil the comfort we derive from what should be a basic necessity but deemed a luxury by them.
I agree that a fall of pristine snow is a beautiful sight but better enjoyed from within a warm room.
Thanks for your feedback.

Luigi

amman on 29-01-2014
In Praise of Winter
I really like this, Luigi. There's something about a crisp winter's day with snow and frozen lakes et al.
You're going to hate me for this, but perhaps glide instead of slide.
Cheers.
Tony.

Author's Reply:
Thanks for the advice Tony but guess what? When I look up glide in the dictionary I also get this: "See Synonyms at slide" and the definition of slide " To pass smoothly and quietly; glide."
So, as both seem to be synonymous, I think I leave it as it is.
Do I hate you now? Not enough to give you the evil eye.

Luigi πŸ™‚

Andrea on 29-01-2014
In Praise of Winter
Lovely pome, Luigi, but can't wait for spring, me. All we seem to get here is dark-grey gloom and rain...

Author's Reply:
Same here, Andrea, rain and rain with the occasional glimpse of sunshine but all too brief. Can't wait for the warmer weather.
Cheers.

pommer on 29-01-2014
In Praise of Winter
Thank you for sharing.I love the winter generally, but there have been times in life ,when dug in the snow for porolonged periods have been a curse.A well written poem Luigi, Pommer.

Author's Reply:
I can well understand that an excess of snow can be a curse. I have just seen a photo on Facebook of a place under snow and a sign which read: "Whoever is praying for snow please stop."
Thanks for reading and commenting Pommer.

Bozzz on 29-01-2014
In Praise of Winter
Moderation in all things - is supposed to be the benefit of our fickle weather. Occasionally things slip - some say when God is distracted by other people's weather problems. If Carol Kirkwood were to be in charge, all would be well - she is gorgeous. Maybe you do not get her forecasts up where you are? Pity....Stay warm...David

Author's Reply:
Don't know Carol Kirkwood, David. I gather she is a weather forecast on Breakfast Television which I don't watch. I have Googled her name and found she is 51 year-old and divorced. Michael Caine would say: 'Not many people know that...'
The weather girls we have may not be so glamourous but are pretty much accurate with their predictions and at the moment the only way to keep warm is staying indoors.

Luigi πŸ™‚

Savvi on 03-02-2014
In Praise of Winter
This is excellent Luigi, the end rhymes are very subtle and well worked and you show some vivid lines, very well done and enjoyable.Best Keith

one small nit would it be better to say spring's rain falls ?

Author's Reply:
Thanks very much for your appreciation, Keith.
Thanks for your suggestion but I think that 'rainfall' is the word that one would find in a dictionary.

Best, Luigi.


History is Bunk (posted on: 24-01-14)
My entry to this week's PROSE/POETRY CHALLENGE

You can rely on Sid for a quote, he has many at his fingertips as if he has learnt them by rote; he cites them with a smile on his lips. You can ask him questions galore, it is a test that he will never flunk, in fact he will recall a few more specially if he happens to be drunk. He'll be non-committal and neutral on every citation that he makes, his main objective is to be truthful and not to be accused of mistakes. You have only to say Henry Ford for him to excitedly exclaim that that name strikes a chord and then all at once to declaim Henry's motto: 'History is bunk.' A concept which means that tradition should be ignored, buried or sunk, that the past be consigned to oblivion. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for History is Bunk
Mikeverdi on 24-01-2014
History is Bunk
Not something I would subscribe too, but as always you tell the tale well Luigi. Mike

Author's Reply:
I am just echoing what Henry Ford said, Mike, not necessarily my opinion. Some people are keen to remember, rather than ignore, the past perhaps to learn the lessons of old mistakes but we seem to repeat those mistakes over and over again.

Cheers, Luigi

Bozzz on 25-01-2014
History is Bunk
A bunk is a place where one can lie in peace until disturbed by another being. It is also an absence from something past - both of which explain the word Henry used - history. Not nonsense - excellent linguist he was. Oh and excellent poem - Luigi, you are truly the rhymer of the century....David

Author's Reply:
Much obliged for your nice comment David.


A Laptop Romance (posted on: 24-01-14)
At once I can tell that she is my type.

I like you, she says - we are talking via Skype - and at once I can tell that she is my type. Her English is broken but her accent is cute. She looks very elegant in a two-piece suit. She's a chief executive at a firm in Krakow; was married ten years but is divorced now. I asked her many times if she would come round but wishes to meet me on neutral ground. So it is with great thanks to my faithful web-cam that I'm off to see her in the city of Potsdam. © Luigi Pagano 2014
Archived comments for A Laptop Romance
Mikeverdi on 24-01-2014
A Laptop Romance
Now we know what you do when not composing you're brilliant poetry Luigi Ha Ha! Mike

Author's Reply:
Writing is only a sideline, Mike, and not a full-time occupation. I have to find other forms of entertainment.

Luigi:-)

Bozzz on 24-01-2014
A Laptop Romance
What is she selling and what are you buying or vice versa. Please make sure they align. Do they need English plumbers in Poland? Will we ever hear from you again? Imagination runs riot - oh, and not a bad little poem either...Take care,,,David

Author's Reply:
Who knows what's around the corner, David. It may lead to something exciting or it could fizzle out. The thrill is in the chase.

ValDohren on 24-01-2014
A Laptop Romance
Have a good trip Luigi !! Enjoyed the poem.
Val πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
I'll try my best, Val. Thanks very much.

Luigi πŸ™‚

pommer on 25-01-2014
A Laptop Romance
Enjoy your trip to Potsdam Luigi,Don't forget to take her to Sanssousi, the wonderful Palace of Frederick the Great.I am sure you will enjoy it.I enjoyed the poem.Be lucky, Pommer.

Author's Reply:
Don't worry Peter I'll be the perfect guide. Thanks for the advice.


Come Into My Parlour (posted on: 20-01-14)
...said the spider to the fly.

There was a whiff of eau de cologne; faint, yet pervasive. Her voice was inviting, her tone persuasive. Was she the spider and I the fly? I felt uncomfortable but don't know why. I thought I'd been put to the test, when she sent me an ambiguous text. She openly flaunted her voluptuous bust erroneously hoping to generate lust. Being the best friend of my loving wife could she be the cause of domestic strife? I had the suspicion it could be a honeytrap and they wished to prove I am a gullible sap. So, nothing happened. Though I'm not a saint a laughable dupe I certainly ain't. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Come Into My Parlour
Mikeverdi on 20-01-2014
Come Into My Parlour
Ha Ha! I know that whole scenario all too well. My three marriages show I never had you're ability to say NO. Great stuff Luigi. Mike

Author's Reply:
Lesson No.1 Mike: if you can't be good be careful and don't be found out.
Cheers.

Bozzz on 20-01-2014
Come Into My Parlour
Great Luigi, this is everyman's mill. For me it is wide hips and eyes that tempt. Age blunts ability, but not desire...David

Author's Reply:
Yes David, I agree about the age limitation but the message doesn't seem to have reached the brain. To be sure I would have to put that temptation to the test.

Elfstone on 20-01-2014
Come Into My Parlour
Another wee pearl. Would that there were more such honourable gents as you in the world! Elfstone

Author's Reply:
Be wary of honourable gents, Elf. Appearances can be deceiving.

Luigi x

Nemo on 20-01-2014
Come Into My Parlour
An amusing adroitly rhyming read, Luigi. I've never read a celebration of virtuosity before. Regards, Gerald.

Author's Reply:
Thanks for the read, Gerald. Not so much virtuosity as self preservation.

Best, Luigi

pommer on 20-01-2014
Come Into My Parlour
Great Luigi,you send a great message to many of us.Well done.
Pommer

Author's Reply:
Message received and understood but will it be acted upon? Hell is paved with good intentions.

Regards, Luigi

ValDohren on 20-01-2014
Come Into My Parlour
Well done you, both for your fortitude and the excellent write.
Val πŸ™‚


Author's Reply:
Thanks Val.

Luigi πŸ™‚

*polishes his halo*

Savvi on 22-01-2014
Come Into My Parlour
You cant make this up
I'd call her bluff
but to avoid the strife
first tell the wife πŸ™‚

Great poem Luigi


Author's Reply:
Hi Savvi. Difficult to know what to do in these difficult circumstances. When extra marital affairs happen the wife (or the husband) is always the last to know. Anyway thanks for the advice.
Cheers.

amman on 24-01-2014
Come Into My Parlour
Such self control, Luigi! Expertly and entertainingly penned, as ever. Enjoyed.
Cheers.
Tony.

Author's Reply:
Sorry for the late reply Tony, I have been away for the week-end. Many thanks for your feedback.


Toujours L'Amour (posted on: 20-01-14)
Ooh La La.

Here in gay Paree we are a friendly bunch; we don't think twice of inviting one to lunch. We like to entertain as a matter of course with social (or sexual) intercourse. We do not mind if we hear that Jean Pierre has installed his mistress in his pied-a-terre. Nor are we surprised to learn that the president has a spare in tow, as well as the one who's resident. We can make love anywhere, in a bed or in a vestibule, but we cannot bear to be held up to ridicule. Can you imagine Cyrano - he with the large hooter- going to meet Roxane in a three-wheeler scooter? © Luigi Pagano 2014 *First published on Poetry24*
Archived comments for Toujours L'Amour
Mikeverdi on 20-01-2014
Toujours LAmour
Ha Ha! there you go again. Terrific stuff, and so 'on the money'. Mike

Author's Reply:
Hi Mike, there is no need for the Muse when the news provide so much inspiration. No one can have failed to notice the recent headlines emanating from France.

Luigi πŸ™‚

Elfstone on 20-01-2014
Toujours LAmour
You're French?!? Well aren't you a dark horse!! πŸ˜‰
Smiled through this - as I so often do with your writing. Elfstone

Author's Reply:
Not quite a Frenchman, Elf; I come from next door where the Italian equivalent of the French Lothario has dominated the press for as long as I remember.

Luigi x

Nemo on 20-01-2014
Toujours LAmour
For mee dar bleu. Gerald.

Author's Reply:
There is a certain element of 'bleu' in the whole affair, Gerald, but I am surprised at the reaction of the French public, normally so relaxed about such matters.

pommer on 20-01-2014
Toujours LAmour
Magnifique,mon ami.Pommer.aka Pierre.

Author's Reply:
Merci Monsieur Pierre. Have you got a pied-a-terre?

ValDohren on 21-01-2014
Toujours LAmour
You said it Luigi - Ooh La La. Can't offer you a response in French as I don't know the language. Great poem - full of Frenchness.
Val πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
No need to know the language, Val, to understand what has been going in the Champs-Γ‰lysΓ©es and its environs. With names like Arc de Triomphe and Place de la Concorde it was inevitable that an entente cordiale should develop but, as it resulted in a mΓ©nage Γ  trois, the (president's) triumph was less than expected.
I must stop gossiping now and thank you for your kind attention.

Luigi


A Good Yarn (posted on: 17-01-14)
My entry to the WEEKLY PROSE AND POETRY CHALLENGE

He was an enthralling narrator who recounted many a good yarn but he never said what took place on that fateful day, in the barn. We thought that the young master might have had his wicked way (more than once) with the milkmaid in that building, on a bale of hay. But what he revealed much later was a story that was rather shady: it transpired that the gamekeeper had played sex games with milady. Her visual acuity was 20/20 and she didn't require any specs; from the moment they met she saw that he had very muscular pecs. We liked that tale much more; though the situation was complex, it was the case of basic instincts that led them to consensual sex. The tame account of young lovers was dwarfed by this steamy affair; we forgot the master and the maid and focused on the adulterous pair. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for A Good Yarn
Elfstone on 18-01-2014
A Good Yarn
Enjoyed this when I read it in Forums; enjoyed it again here. Elfstone

Author's Reply:
Much appreciated, Elf, many thanks.

Luigi πŸ™‚


Poncho, Red Shirt, Sombrero (posted on: 10-01-14)
Hero of Two Worlds.

Garibaldi photo Garibaldi_zpscbda342b.jpg I have read about Giuseppe Garibaldi a name that's often rhymed with oldie but which ought to rhyme with Grimaldi. There is an orange fish with that name referring to the red shirts that he wore during the wars that brought him fame. I also learnt that he visited Tynemouth where a biscuit was made in his honour before he went once again to the south. But what he should be remembered for are his achievements on the battlefield that have become embedded in folklore. Because he fought in Europe and abroad he was called the 'Hero of Two Worlds'; Italy, though, would always be his abode. He met and married Anita, from Brazil, she fought with him, gave him four kids, and their existence was far from tranquil. She was poor and did not have a cruizero but she enriched his life with her culture, taught him how to wear poncho and sombrero. She was a presence in his heart all his life, died of malaria while fleeing the French. He never got over the demise of his wife. Over his poncho he wore her striped scarf when he hailed the king of a united Italy. It could not have chosen a better epitaph. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Poncho, Red Shirt, Sombrero
Elfstone on 10-01-2014
Poncho, Red Shirt, Sombrero
We were taught about Garibaldi and 'The Unification of Italy' in History when I was at school; which is only interesting if one considers that we were not taught one page, paragraph or word of Scottish history. Odd, don't you think, that once I knew more about your country's history than my own?

An interesting read as always Ionicus. Elfstone

Author's Reply:
Hearing that you are so familiar with the unification of Italy brings to mind the words coal and Newcastle.
Sorry to hear you missed out on the history of your country, Elf, but I'm sure you have rectified the omission since your schooldays. I, on the other hand, was taught European history on a wider scale and that included England and Scotland. It was eon ago and some of it is now forgotten but still retain memory of most events.
Thanks for your comment.

Luigi x

Andrea on 10-01-2014
Poncho, Red Shirt, Sombrero
Another fascinating history lesson, Luigi!

Author's Reply:
Thanks Andrea.

Luigi x

Mikeverdi on 11-01-2014
Poncho, Red Shirt, Sombrero
I have walked in his footsteps, streets that were named after him; stood by his monument looking out over the city. As always Luigi you tell a story well. Mike

Author's Reply:
Hi Mike. Knowing your fondness for Italy, I thought you'd appreciate a slice of its history and the important part that Garibaldi played in that country's unification.
Thanks for the comment and generous rating.

Luigi:-)


A Perfect Child (posted on: 06-01-14)
A unique youth.

What child is this? He is very polite, obeys his parents, does everything right. Not quite an adult, he's nearly thirteen, is wise for his age and to learn very keen. Composed and tranquil doesn't throw a tantrum and patiently collects stamps in an album. His usual behaviour is perfectly fine and sometimes I wish that this boy was mine. Yet this infant prodigy who's full of dιcor is not my son but lives next door. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for A Perfect Child
Bozzz on 06-01-2014
A Perfect Child
Are you absolutely certain that he is not your boy - no hidden dallies? You also are capable being tranquil, polite etc - well, most times ! .....Good wishes...David.

Author's Reply:
I readily admit to two daughters, David, but a secret son has not yet placed a claim.
The underlining message here is not one of paternity but to point out that among the much maligned youth of today there are still decent, respectful kids who do not indulge in a loutish behaviour.

Best, Luigi.

Elfstone on 07-01-2014
A Perfect Child
I sometimes taught boys (and girls) like this. They were a joy; real teaching took place - not just controlling, nannying, social-working, policing .... You're right there are still some very delightful kids around - because there are still some parents around who get it right. Elfstone.

Author's Reply:
You are so right, Elf, a lot depends on how the parents bring up the children. I can well believe that teaching in that atmosphere can be quite rewarding.

Best, Luigi.


Out with the Old (posted on: 30-12-13)
...and in with the New.

On the 31st of December the New Year will arrive in the guise of a young child who'll keep our dreams alive but Old Father Time seems reluctant to go. Why he dilly-dallies we shall never know because during his tenure the annus was horribilis whereas we were promised an annus quite mirabilis. There is nothing wonderful in conflicts and unrest, in refugees and misery, in poverty and means test. Perhaps the old geezer was hoping for green shoots but a cartel of bankers by working in cahoots made sure that the economy remained at a standstill. Events here and abroad continued to bode ill; any attempts at peace were all rendered void; the job market declined, the youth were unemployed. We hope but can't be sure that this incoming boy will improve matters and be a bringer of joy. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Out with the Old
barenib on 30-12-2013
Out with the Old
I think we may be a little long in the tooth for such things - but we can hope! Anyway, happy new year to you Luigi - John.

Author's Reply:
When there is life, there is hope, John.

Happy New Year.

Andrea on 30-12-2013
Out with the Old
I certainly hope so, Luigi! Happy new year to you and yours!

Author's Reply:
And a happy New Year to you Andrea. I am off to celebrate, see you in 2014.

deadpoet on 31-12-2013
Out with the Old
Where would we be without hope Luigi--

Happy New Year and thanks for the one that now is passing.

See you next year..
Pia
xx

Author's Reply:
Hello Pia. Here I am again in 2014 after seeing the New Year in.

Best wishes, Luigi xx

Elfstone on 31-12-2013
Out with the Old
"We hope but can’t be sure
that this incoming boy
will improve matters
and be a bringer of joy. "

- well, he hasn't yet; which does beg the question - how long does one go on hoping?
An enjoyable read - as always πŸ™‚ Elfstone

Author's Reply:
Give him time, Elf. Things will get better, I'm certain.

Wish you all the best, Luigi x

Bozzz on 01-01-2014
Out with the Old
I fear that if I live to hear him speak, his first babbles will remind me of the House of Commons. His job and your poem both well done. Cheers Luigi - keep well my friend....David

Author's Reply:
Apropos of the House of Commons we have got used to hearing promises. Let's hope that this infant keeps his when he reaches maturity.
Good health to you too, David.

Luigi


At the Sales (posted on: 30-12-13)
Bargain hunting.

I'm looking for a bargain, searching the clothes rails for a pair of nice trousers at the New Year's sales. My wife came with me and I will tell you why; she's a shrewd shopper and has an eagle-eye. 'My waist is thirty-three'. 'No, not on your Nelly, it's at least thirty-eight; look at your beer-belly!' Suddenly I feel deflated, my world is looking grim, it seems only yesterday that my waistline was slim. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for At the Sales
Corin on 30-12-2013
At the Sales
Only 38! Well join the club. If you ever decide to splash out on a bespoke suit you will suffer the indignity (as Idid) of being asked, β€œ Do you want it to be cut to fit above your bump or below it, Sir??”

David

Author's Reply:
I sympathise, David, there is no consideration for senior citizens anymore.

Happy new year.

Andrea on 30-12-2013
At the Sales
That'll teach you to go out fighting the mad hordes, Luigi πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Yeah, madness isn't it ? Couldn't resist it though: it was all that advertising on TV.

Cheers, Luigi x

Bozzz on 30-12-2013
At the Sales
Occasionally the customer wins. I know of one trouser case where the tailor said, "Which side do you prefer your equipment to hang, Sir" - The response was "Just make em baggy at the knees". Nice poem - not the best present though...David

Author's Reply:
A very good response, David. I can never find a quick, witty repartee.
Thanks, Luigi.

pommer on 30-12-2013
At the Sales
Nice poem, made me laugh.Pommer

Author's Reply:
Good on you, Pommer.

Cheers, Luigi.

Mikeverdi on 30-12-2013
At the Sales
Told with you're usual flair and panache Luigi, Ha Ha! Mike

Author's Reply:
Much appreciated, Mike. Thanks.


A Spot of Bother (posted on: 27-12-13)
Taking it on the chin.

I should drown my sorrows, be miserable and desolate; but I'm being philosophical and enjoying hot chocolate. I am told that this is wrong that I should drink whisky but I think that feeling sorry makes the situation risky. Perhaps you are mystified and ask why I made a switch from optimism to cynicism: it's all down to a lying bitch. I was given to understand that my love was paramount but then she abandoned me, and cleaned my bank account. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for A Spot of Bother
Mikeverdi on 27-12-2013
A Spot of Bother
Oh dear Luigi, I do hope that this is 'just a poem'...if so then its jolly good, if not then you have my heart felt sympathy, as I know the feeling. (it's still a good poem) Mike

Author's Reply:
Dear Mike, perhaps the fact that the category says 'Fiction' might give you a clue.
I thank you for your concern, which is much appreciated, and for your kind comment.
Luigi πŸ™‚

Mikeverdi on 27-12-2013
A Spot of Bother
Oppppppp's. Senior moment. Mike

Author's Reply:
Senior moments, I know them well Mike. Yesterday I asked my daughter to read one of my latest poems on the web but I couldn't recall its title. I had to refresh my memory by looking for it myself. LOL.

ValDohren on 28-12-2013
A Spot of Bother
Nothing like hot chocolate to soothe a troubled brow - you could put the whisky in the chocolate ! Great poem, good for a laugh.
Val

Author's Reply:
I have put whisky (or brandy) in my coffee but never considered the whisky/chocolate combination. Something to look forward to perhaps; I'll try anything once.
Thanks Val.

Luigi

pommer on 29-12-2013
A Spot of Bother
J hope it is only a poem Luigi.I must say I prefer a wee dram of the hard stuff to hot chocolate. Happy New Year, Pommer.

Author's Reply:
Yes Pommer, it is just a whimsical poem. Not a shred of truth in it, not even the hot chocolate. A single malt is a better proposition.

Prost, Luigi.


A Year to Remember (posted on: 16-12-13)
An acrostic poem.

Jane is quite feverish, Febrifuges make her liverish, Marriage puts her under stress. Apropos of the wedding dress Maybe the garment is abject, Junk she will have to reject. Julep does not calm her nerves, Augmenting her fear, one observes. Septuagenarian is her groom-to-be, Octogenarian more likely is he. Novelist, who was great in the past, Decided to get married at last. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for A Year to Remember
Elfstone on 16-12-2013
A Year to Remember
Another very clever one - I smiled all the way through and I admire the skill involved in writing this. Elf

Author's Reply:
I had great fun in writing this, Elf, and though the scope was limited I was quite satisfied with the result.
Glad to hear that it made you smile.

Luigi xxx

Andrea on 16-12-2013
A Year to Remember
Excellent, Luigi!

Author's Reply:
Ta muchly, Andrea.

Kipper on 16-12-2013
A Year to Remember
Acrostic indeed, and very cleverly crafted. But even without the constraints of the format it tells a good story.
BTW, were you invited?
Michael

Author's Reply:
Thanks for reading and commenting, Michael. I agree about the constraints, it wasn't easy to construct a coherent thread but I managed somehow.
Was I invited? Are you kidding? I was that groom!

Mikeverdi on 17-12-2013
A Year to Remember
Now that's just so well done Luigi, I could never do that; it looks harder than the Sunday times cross word. πŸ™‚ Mike

Author's Reply:
I suppose it's just as hard, Mike, I managed to complete the Sunday Times crossword only once. I am sure you could do something like this if you applied yourself. Nothing is impossible: that's my philosophy.

Luigi πŸ™‚

barenib on 17-12-2013
A Year to Remember
Hi Luigi, I love the old acrostic verses, always good for a chuckle, especially in your case! John.

Author's Reply:
John, many thanks. Appreciated.

Weefatfella on 17-12-2013
A Year to Remember
 photo 9ad6ff1f-0d9b-467e-b5d6-2d3f72a688a0_zps705a5781.jpgAye , A hard shift put in here Luigi. I can't give you a nib, but I can Do This...
 photo nibb_zpsc421020c.jpg I Hope you and your family have a wonderful Christmas luigi. ( Buon Natale luigi )
Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
Hi Paul, delighted with the feathery quill.
Many thanks for your Christmas wishes and not knowing the Scottish language I resorted to a stock translation which I hope is correct: A Blythe Yule an a Guid Hogmanay.

Kipper on 17-12-2013
A Year to Remember
Just so you know, your response to my earlier comment hit the spot. I think you might have heard my laughing over their.
Michael

Author's Reply:

Kipper on 17-12-2013
A Year to Remember
Just so you know, your response to my earlier comment hit the spot. I think you might have heard my laughing over their.
Michael

Author's Reply:
I did indeed, Michael, and joined you in the laughter.
Cheers.


An ABC Tale (posted on: 13-12-13)
Exactly what the title says.

Adam and Alan Became best buddies Collecting Chinese coins And always ate Before breakfast began Chewing cold chicken Arriving at airport Being Boston bound Chose company car Acting absolutely absurdly By blithely blabbering Confounded courteous chauffeur © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for An ABC Tale
deadpoet on 13-12-2013
An ABC Tale
Clever Luigi- well done.

Author's Reply:
Thanks Pia.

Luigi x

Andrea on 13-12-2013
An ABC Tale
Love the alliteration in this, Luigi.

Author's Reply:
Cheers Andrea, appreciate it.

Luigi x

Elfstone on 14-12-2013
An ABC Tale
A sort of truncated acrostic - yes? Very clever - well done! Elfstone

Author's Reply:
A good way to describe it, Elf, although I don't know if it follows any poetic convention. I had fun in writing it and it is pleasing to hear that you liked it.

Luigi x

Bozzz on 14-12-2013
An ABC Tale
A-letteration begets compliments. ...David

Author's Reply:
Your comment wasn't difficult to understand, David. As easy as ABC.
Cheers, Luigi.

ValDohren on 15-12-2013
An ABC Tale
You always write such clever and unusual poems Luigi, great alliteration.
Val x

Author's Reply:
It's just a bit of fun to keep myself amused, Val, and also to see if anybody else shares my sense of humour.

Luigi x


Hope Springs Eternal (posted on: 06-12-13)
The Hubble telescope will determine if the Ison comet is extinct

I read of the comet Ison's demise and could not contain my surprise. It was evident things weren't well as everyone rang the death knell. The frozen nucleus neared the sun and just like Dedalus's reckless son, whose wings dissolved in the heat, its annihilation seemed complete. But, looking through the telescope, the scientists reckon there's hope that a fragment of the comet is alive and will not, like Icarus, take a dive. They caution all of us to be realistic but to remain to an extent optimistic. The remnants could still be bright or disappear altogether out of sight. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Hope Springs Eternal
Bozzz on 07-12-2013
Hope Springs Eternal
Strange that we should think to care about the welfare of a lump of barren rock floating millions of miles away in space. Well, in our madness, we love dogs and cats, why not a rock or two? Thanks Luigi, for reminding us us of our universal responsibilities....Good stuff,,,,,David

Author's Reply:
Sorry for the late reply, David. I have been watching snooker. Makes a change from worrying about lumps of barren rocks disappearing in space but to put your mind at rest I was not part of those concerned observers but merely commenting on the event as reported by the media. Thanks for stopping by.

Luigi


Fame (posted on: 02-12-13)
This started life in the Forum challenge. It has now been edited and extended.

 photo Guitarplayers_zps27f99354.png Mark my words. We are going to be big. Let's arm ourselves with electric guitars, book a nice venue and perform a gig. With three silhouettes as our avatars, it shouldn't be difficult to achieve fame. It is on the stage that our talent shows but good reputations are built on a name: what if we called our band 'The Shadows'? Our lead singer is no longer in his prime, he wears Doc Martens and sports a quiff. Writes his own songs which do not rhyme and his pizzicato, or palm muting, is stiff. He's no Pavarotti but he is a good actor, he doesn't let on we failed the X Factor. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Fame
bo_duke99 on 02-12-2013
Fame
who needs fame anyway - as good fun as ever, Greg

Author's Reply:
Too true, Greg, who wants to be famous with all the complications it entails? All those handshakes would damage my wrist, my writing career would be over and another talent would be lost to the nation.
Cheers.

dylan on 03-12-2013
Fame
Always good to read your work, Luigi.
Another nice one.

Orrabest,

D.

Author's Reply:
Molto gentile, Signor Dylan. Mille grazie.

Pronto on 03-12-2013
Fame
Very witty Luigi I enjoyed the read. Thanks for sharing.

Author's Reply:
My thanks to you, Pronto, for reading and commenting.

Best, Luigi.

deadpoet on 04-12-2013
Fame
I always enjoy your work Luigi- I think this was fun to read- what does 'quiff' mean?
Piaxx

Author's Reply:
Thanks Pia. Quiff: a prominent forelock (especially one brushed upward from the forehead).

Luigi xxx

pommer on 04-12-2013
Fame
Well done Luigi,enjoyed the read as always. Pommer

Author's Reply:
So kind, Pommer. Thank you.

Luigi


The Hair of the Dog (posted on: 29-11-13)
Alcoholics paid in BEER to clean the streets of Amsterdam.

In the land of the clog, Amsterdam's hot shots have got a new idea for cleaning the streets: employ a few sots and reward their labour with the hair of the dog. Five cans of beer, 8 euros and a lunch plus a pouch of tobacco are attractive to blokes who can pack a punch. It keeps them busy and Oosterpark clear. It sounds a good deal yet some are uneasy and fear that drink adds fuel to the fire. But others think that the objectors suffer from zeal. At least if they sup, a spokesman said, they won't binge. Moreover it's good for them to be active and be encouraged to pull their socks up. © Luigi Pagano 2013 *Also published on Poetry24*
Archived comments for The Hair of the Dog
Bozzz on 29-11-2013
The Hair of the Dog
A new meaning for 'going Dutch'? I asked a gardener at Kirstenbosch botanical gardens at Cape Town how they kept the lawns free of moles. He took me to a big tree and pointed upwards. Eagle owls perching. Only guts needed, not hair. Nice piece Luigi.

Author's Reply:
I suppose you could define it as 'going Dutch', David, I don't know of any other country adopting a similar method.
Sometimes extreme measures are required to combat a problem and what better solution than having eagle owls to obliterate the pests in the botanical gardens at Cape Town.

deadpoet on 30-11-2013
The Hair of the Dog
I don't know what to make of this incentive? But I did learn a new expression Luigi- 'the hair of a dog'

Author's Reply:
It seems that the plan received mixed reviews, Pia.
The English language is littered with idiomatic expressions so be prepared to come across many more.

Luigi x

Andrea on 30-11-2013
The Hair of the Dog
Can't see it working meself - 5 cans of beer is nothing to a true and dedicated alchie (who wouldn't even dream of supping).

Ze zouden ook liever sterke drank hebben in plaats van bier.

Author's Reply:
From our Dutch correspondent:
"They also prefer to have liquor instead of beer."

So it looks as the initiative is doomed from the start and the clever clogs of Amsterdam have to find alternative inducements or another type of labour force.
Back to square one, I think, or should it be terug bij af?

Luigi x

Mikeverdi on 30-11-2013
The Hair of the Dog
Ye Gods Luigi! I swear, like Bozz you could make a poem out of anything. The streets of Plymouth could do with some kind of initiative; if it work's in clog land I will mute it here. πŸ™‚ Mike

Author's Reply:
Mike, there is inspiration all around us to make poets of us all. It isn't a prerogative of the few and you only have to look at the spate of good entries on this site, your contributions included, to see that there is no lack of talented people.
Obviously there is something wrong with the streets of Plymouth or you wouldn't have mentioned it but I doubt that the Amsterdam's initiative would do any good and I refer you to Andrea's comment.

All the best, Luigi.

bo_duke99 on 01-12-2013
The Hair of the Dog
a most striking initiative, and explored with an impish 'zeal' - Greg

Author's Reply:
According to some it's going down a treat, Greg. It remains to be seen if it falls flat.


An Invite to the Palace (posted on: 25-11-13)
A poetry invite to the palace: are you on the list?

They are changing their image at Buckingham palace but whatever one thinks it is without malice. They are allowing poets on their hallowed grounds, with a posse of photographers and loads of newshounds. They've sent invitations to a selected few and one of the chosen is aged ninety-two. They will listen to bards at Buckingham Palace but one absentee is poor little Alice. A poet of distinction, she likes to perform yet, being a rebel, she won't conform. Her views on the monarchy is what got her barred but the Palace was hoisted by its own petard. © Luigi Pagano 2013 * Also published on Poetry24 *
Archived comments for An Invite to the Palace
Mikeverdi on 25-11-2013
An Invite to the Palace
Another cracker Luigi, said Verdi !

Author's Reply:
Hi Mike. Unfortunately I couldn't go but I'm sure that you can fill me in on how it all went.
Cheers.

Weefatfella on 25-11-2013
An Invite to the Palace
 photo 9ad6ff1f-0d9b-467e-b5d6-2d3f72a688a0_zps705a5781.jpg

 photo acoo_zpsc0a3adc6.jpg
Weefatfella.


Author's Reply:
Would you trust a bloke that went down with Alice, at the Palace? Luigi says beware.
Thanks for the pictorial comment, Paul.

Bozzz on 25-11-2013
An Invite to the Palace
Luigi, you should have known better. Write about dogs or horses if you wish to mix with UK royals. But wait a few years and it will be climate change - I will beat you to it - from the grave...Greeting...David.

Author's Reply:

Bozzz on 25-11-2013
An Invite to the Palace
Luigi, you should have known better. Write about dogs or horses if you wish to mix with UK royals. But wait a few years and it will be climate change - I will beat you to it - from the grave...Greeting...David.

Author's Reply:
Why didn't I think of that before, David? I could rhyme corgy with porgy then extend the reference to Bess...
I can see it all, it's already forming in my head.
For there to be a climate change on that front it would take an enormous upheaval. Can't see it it myself, not in a few years at least.

Best, Luigi

bo_duke99 on 26-11-2013
An Invite to the Palace
a spirited, jaunty number

Author's Reply:
The green-eyed monster may have been at work but it's all in good spirit, Greg.

Kipper on 26-11-2013
An Invite to the Palace
I almost felt the urge to sing. Pity you didn't record it.
Good one

Michael

Author's Reply:
Writing I don't find too difficult but recording is a different kettle of fish. If you have the misfortune to listen to some of my recordings - few, but they are there - you would understand my reluctance.
Still it is heartening to hear you enjoyed it, Michael. Thanks.


A TV Critic and a Birth (posted on: 18-11-13)
Thrilling news that Big Carlo missed.

Here comes the TV critic whose views are respected by the entire body politic, not altogether unexpected. She sits at her usual table. She hasn't been for a while. I am entranced and unable to resist her beguiling smile. I am not her regular waiter, that is the Italian, big Carlo, who isn't on duty till later; he lives in the town of Harlow. 'How are you, Miss', I enquire, 'I'm well, thank you', she replies. The colour of blue sapphire is reflected in her beautiful eyes. 'I recently gave birth to a girl', she adds with joy in her voice. The news leaves me in a whirl and shocked; I have no choice. 'She's a miss, she can't have', I think. 'It must be a mistake. It isn't the way she'd behave, besides, she's as thin as a rake.' Seeing my confusion she says that retaining 'Miss' as a title is a sign of distinction nowadays and in her profession vital. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for A TV Critic and a Birth
bo_duke99 on 18-11-2013
A TV Critic and a Birth
old morals, and a tightly crafted piece Luigi - Greg

Author's Reply:
You are right, Greg, it is the kind of thinking that oldies like me grew up with. In the past being a miss indicated that a girl was unmarried and a pregnancy outside marriage would have been considered immoral.
Nowadays being called Miss or Ms. is a sign of feminine independence and not of marital status.

barenib on 19-11-2013
A TV Critic and a Birth
Good stuff Luigi, and I think a first that I can remember with a poem with Harlow in it! John.

Author's Reply:
Cheers John. Couldn't think of many words to rhyme with Carlo but would not be beaten.
Hope you are well.

Luigi


Sense and Sensitivity (posted on: 18-11-13)
My entry to last Wednesday's Forum Challenge. The prompt was SQUEAMISH.

In my youth I was squeamish about most things but mainly if it involved cleaning the fish. The eyes of the dead creature would accuse me of the crimes of capture, killing and torture. I could never, and I tell no lies, touch their scales, but one day the scales fell from my eyes. Then I'd gut a cod or a sturgeon with skill and handling a knife with finesse like a brain surgeon. Fearless now, I could watch ops being shown on TV's screens but I 'd balk at seeing a corpse. And I can say, for what is worth, that one thing that banishes fear is to witness your own child's birth. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Sense and Sensitivity
Mikeverdi on 18-11-2013
Sense and Sensitivity
This is so good Luigi, it comes over as if part of your autobiography; I want to believe it is.
Mike

Author's Reply:
The part about cleaning the fish was inspired by the great quantity of it that my father, a keen angler, brought home. So, to a certain extent it is autobiographical. I was never involved in gutting it but it made a big impression on me.

Andrea on 18-11-2013
Sense and Sensitivity
I had a friend who loved trout, and her favourite part was the eyeballs, which she crunched, raw, with great glee. A delicacy she said!

Yep, witnessing childbirth will do it for a bloke πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Hi Andrea. The eyes seem to exercise fascination for some but they can also be off-putting. My late aunt once cooked a dish with squid, displaying their tentacles and eyes for effect. My wife would not eat it and it was some time before she contemplated trying the fried ones.

As for witnessing the childbirth: done that but never got the t-shirt πŸ™‚

deadpoet on 18-11-2013
Sense and Sensitivity
This is a masterpiece Luigi- I'm squeamish when it comes to gutting a fish. I missed this challenge- hope I can manage this weeks-

Pia
x

Author's Reply:
Hardly a masterpiece, Pia, but it was fun writing it. You are too generous with your rating but it is accepted with gratitude. Thanks.

Luigi x

bo_duke99 on 18-11-2013
Sense and Sensitivity
a journey through your personal gore - the flatness of the admission in the third stanza floored me

Author's Reply:
All of us have our foibles, bo. Sometimes we can get rid of them and at other times we are lumbered with them our entire life. Many thanks for reading and commenting.

Texasgreg on 19-11-2013
Sense and Sensitivity
Aye, Luigi! I remember cleaning my first bluegill as well as teaching my son on catfish. Undoubtedly a life-lesson and loved your finish!

Greg πŸ™‚

 photo Gunspincowboy.gif

Author's Reply:
It is an experience that many go through, Greg. My father caught a lot of lake and river fish but I was spared the chore of cleaning it as I seemed to be absent at the opportune moment.
Cheers.

Bozzz on 19-11-2013
Sense and Sensitivity
What's the point of competing when Luigi is the field. I will have to wait until he is the judge again. Moan moan moan ...David

Author's Reply:
I don't know what the moaning is about, David, seeing that the coveted 'Golden Egg' was awarded to none other than...Bozzz.


Typhoon (posted on: 15-11-13)
A patchwork poem.*

The wind is part of a hundred leagues of power, that man is supposed to have mastered. Upon earth and ocean, it rushed screaming and forward with a wanton fury went, playing a game of Blind-Man's Bluff with Death. It swept the town allotments, plot by plot, and soon ransacked the empty houses; some men leaped forth, and ever as they came their cries wakened all the dwellers near; the more remote ran stumbling with their fear. Blown by strong winds the fiery tempest roars and splitting tiles descend in rattling showers. Scared people hurry, storming the doors in crowds, screaming like frightened animals. Meanwhile the roar continues, till at length it will vanish and the stars will shine again. © Luigi Pagano 2013 *A patchwork poem (also known as Cento) is made up of verses by different writers. I have used lines (with minor tweaks) by the following poets: John Masefield, David Herbert Lawrence, John Dryden, Crosbie Garstin Richard Church, Wilfrid Wilson Gibson, John Donne, John Gay, William Wordsworth, Siegfried Sassoon, Bernard Spencer, Rudyard Kipling.
Archived comments for Typhoon
deadpoet on 15-11-2013
Typhoon
Quite an accomplishment Luigi and what a typhoon it was in the Phillipines!

Author's Reply:
You are so right, Pia, it was a destructive typhoon of such a magnitude that it wiped out most of that country's villages and cities, causing thousand of deaths. Only now, a week after the disaster, some relief is beginning to arrive but that is due to logistic problems, we are told. The emergency disaster fund has had a tremendous response.

Bozzz on 16-11-2013
Typhoon
Thoughtful, brill, more than a mouthful, sharp and apt. The next question is "Who wrote what"? I might get one if I tried, but really it is goodnight Vienna for me. Good Luigi.

Author's Reply:


A Reply To A Submission (posted on: 11-11-13)
An 'Equivoque' poem. By reading the odd lines only we get the opposite meaning to the one suggested by the whole poem.

Dear Sir, today we've got your novel and we don't think it is an unsolicited manuscript, on the contrary we welcome it a lot. We can see right away if someone sends us something that it is a lot of rubbish but yours has made our day. We must make it clear: if we find any chaff, we have reason to bin it. Yet, you needn't fear. I am sure that you'll be a long lasting author and not a five-minute wonder as many are, believe me. Our unbiased advice to those who have no talent is to give it all up and we never tell lies. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for A Reply To A Submission
deadpoet on 11-11-2013
A Reply To A Submission
Very clever Luigi- I got it this time..

Pia

Author's Reply:
So, you saw through my little trick! Wasn't too difficult, was it?

Luigi x

Andrea on 11-11-2013
A Reply To A Submission
Hahaha. very good πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
No laughing matter, Andrea, it's the story of my life!
Not quite true: I am used to rejections but I never tried to write a novel, let alone submit one.

Luigi x

bluepootle on 11-11-2013
A Reply To A Submission
Very clever!

Author's Reply:
You have no fear on that score, Blue, and I mean it most sincerely.

Luigi x

franciman on 11-11-2013
A Reply To A Submission
OK Luigi,
I get the message! This is really clever.
cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
A bit of fun writing, Jim, but also true of the double-speak of some publishers who want to soften the blow of rejection.
Grateful for your support, thanks.

Luigi


Mikeverdi on 11-11-2013
A Reply To A Submission
Oh yes Luigi! this is so clever. Mike

Author's Reply:
We would miss these delightful replies if we self-published. Oh, the fun of it.

Cheers, Luigi

Bozzz on 11-11-2013
A Reply To A Submission
Great Heavens Luigi ! How long did you work as a publisher then? Had I known this before I would have been far more polite in commenting on your always excellent pieces. In future I will crawl appropriately.... grrrrreat poem.....David

Author's Reply:
Beware of publishers who speak with forked tongues, and faint praises, David. Flattery will get you nowhere.
They lie easily and feel guilty. Which reminds me that a certain Bozzz has posted something to do with guilt.
I better go and check it out.

Luigi

Bozzz on 11-11-2013
A Reply To A Submission
Worry not for me, Luigi, for you must detect those who speak with tongue in cheek, their grovelling is but mockery - for which I do admit to feeling guilty. With immaculate and true respect....David

Author's Reply:
Being an exponent of tongue-in-cheek myself I can easily spot those of that ilk, David, and if mockery is detected they'll soon be marginalised. It is the case of who has the last laugh.

Yours truly (most sincerely as Hugh Greene used to say)
Luigi

Weefatfella on 11-11-2013
A Reply To A Submission
 photo 06d74512-a3fb-4081-8172-f3ae5390860b_zpse75163c6.jpg
Aye Ya old fox, I'll be checking your comments in future for "frasi nascoste" Luigi.
Cheers mate, very well done indeed.
Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
No 'frasi nascoste' from me, Paul, I call a spade a spade even when I know it is a fork.
Cheers.

ValDohren on 11-11-2013
A Reply To A Submission
Can only echo what has already been said - very clever indeed Luigi.
Val

Author's Reply:
Something a bit different at least, Val. I enjoyed writing it. Thanks for reading.

Luigi

Pronto on 12-11-2013
A Reply To A Submission
Oh what a witty write mate. I loved they way you have composed this poem. Worth a ten for the thought alone!

Author's Reply:
Very kind in your assessment of this fun poem and generous too with your rating. Thank you, Pronto.

EmotiveSoul on 12-11-2013
A Reply To A Submission
Belittling or utter ignorance is usually the response many publishers give to the work of others. I commend your poem and hope you find the success in the future. Daz

Author's Reply:
Daz, I am much encouraged by your support. I enjoy writing but don't envisage making a career of it and I am just satisfied if, and when, some of my poetry is published.

Luigi

Texasgreg on 13-11-2013
A Reply To A Submission
Aye, Luigi! Though small encouragements may also keep 'em on track to the benefit of all one day, eh? Well done...gotta go check out an e-mail from some dethroned prince asking me to take his inheritance now.

Greg πŸ™‚

 photo Gunspincowboy.gif

Author's Reply:
We can but hope, Greg.
I have told that prince to keep his money as my safe is not big enough but if he cares to send me a banker's draft...

Luigi πŸ™‚

bo_duke99 on 13-11-2013
A Reply To A Submission
ha ha, really neat

Author's Reply:
Nice hearing from you, bo. Thanks.


A Call to Arms (posted on: 08-11-13)
...for absent friends.

 photo d12ffa1a-b86e-42ad-a5ab-6994b5136b5f_zps8c6b1e5c.jpg As we need men to take part in the Forum * - as well as women with a literary bent - one solution would be to have a quorum but it wouldn't work if many were absent. The target set would be relatively modest, eight or nine authors, or much better ten, who were prepared to labour in earnest to write prose or poetry without a pen but with a keyboard and related mouse. Something inspiring or downright rude but full of meaning and likely to arouse a broadminded person who isn't a prude. Up to today the requirement's been short yet we are convinced that, with a nudge, more wordsmiths will give us their support. And that is something we won't begrudge. © Luigi Pagano 2013 * PROSE AND POETRY CHALLENGES
Archived comments for A Call to Arms
deadpoet on 08-11-2013
A Call to Arms
Well done Luigi.. brilliant rhyme-

Pia


Author's Reply:
Thanks Pia. You don't need a call to arms nor a nudge. You are a regular, willing and able.
I understand people's reluctance to join the Forum challenge: anything posted there takes second place to the main site where the majority of readers go.
No harm in trying to drum up business though.

Luigi x

amman on 09-11-2013
A Call to Arms
Cleverly presented, Luigi. The latest word challenge cupboard is looking a tad bare tho'. Nothing posted yet.
Cheers.
Tony.

Author's Reply:
Hi Tony. True, the last time I looked the cupboard was bare. Could it be that people are too 'SQUEAMISH'?
Note to non participants: that was a reference to the current prompt. Aren't you tempted to write something imaginative on the subject?

Bozzz on 09-11-2013
A Call to Arms
A delightful and seductive recruiting piece, would that we could all reach your own standard of composition. Competitive spirit comes in many forms, mine is with myself. A struggle between writing and not being able to write. My birthday labels me mercurial..... good luck Sir....David

Author's Reply:
You are not getting away so easily David. We all want to see your competitive spirit in an arena which is anything but competitive. The forum PROSE AND POETRY CHALLENGES
is fun based and it is a place for friendly rivalry. God forbid 'in-depth' critique.
Cheers.
Luigi

Andrea on 09-11-2013
A Call to Arms
Excellent Luigi! And here's is where they need to go --> PROSE AND POETRY CHALLENGES

Author's Reply:
Thanks Andrea. I am useless at creating links so yours was very welcome. I have incorporated it as a footnote to the poem so people can have an idea as to what it is about.

Luigi x


A Day Trip (posted on: 04-11-13)
***

It was a Bank Holiday but we didn't rest, we got up and dressed in our Sunday best. The rendezvous point was in Market Square; there were nimbus clouds but we didn't care. It was a day trip organised by the bank and we waited patiently for our charabanc. It was Fred, I recall, who took a group snap though at first he forgot to take off the lens cap. He asked us to say 'cheese' then the session was over and we were on our way to the port of Dover. The chance to see France was reason enough to attempt the crossing but the sea was too rough. With ferries having stopped, and increasing rain, it seemed that our outing had been all in vain. To the rescue came Fred who said that he'd found a delightful place called 'The Fox and Hound' where with gallons of ale we could drown our sorrow, get drunk and oblivious like there was no tomorrow. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for A Day Trip
Andrea on 04-11-2013
A Day Trip
Really like this, Luigi - did I say that already? πŸ™‚

Dunno how you do it, so prolific and consistent. I've hit a dry patch, alas...

Author's Reply:
I think you may have mentioned it. Thanks once again.
I don't always come up with the goods but, given a good inspiration point or a prompt, I try my best to concot something.

Luigi x

Weefatfella on 04-11-2013
A Day Trip
 photo 89f4a5d0-5f15-4509-881e-443a08debcc5_zps272a8411.jpg
Aye, if in doubt head tae the pub.
Always the way of it.
Cheers Luigi, it's always worth a drop in.
Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
I'll have a half, Paul. Cheers!

deadpoet on 05-11-2013
A Day Trip
Not quite France but I suppose the next best thing Luigi- I echo Andrea- I don't know how you come up with all these- always a pleasure to read your stuff.

Pia
x

Author's Reply:
Not quite France, as you say Pia, but "Are we bitter? Not on your nelly! A pint of your best, landlord."
For a Brit the traditional pub is a more than an adequate replacement.
It's rewarding to read that you enjoy reading my stuff. Thanks.

Luigi x

barenib on 05-11-2013
A Day Trip
There's always a pub to bail you out! I never tire of your tales Luigi! John.

Author's Reply:
Hello John, nice to hear from you. I shall endeavour to keep writing my little tales and hope that the well doesn't run dry.
To your good health.

Luigi


Cinderella - The Truth (posted on: 01-11-13)
A non-PC version of a fairy tale. (A Forum challenge entry).

This is the story of a lovelorn prince who met a girl at a New Year's ball but she had ran away, people recall, and he hasn't seen his beloved since. They say her shoes were made of glass but the description doesn't seem right. The gossip is she didn't get an invite because she was a poor working lass. But all this stuff is purely hypothetical, most likely her shoes were made of silk or another product that was of that ilk and a rebuttal would be seen as heretical. In truth, Cinderella hadn't actually fled. The prince's proposal had been distinct and it had reawakened her basic instinct: she's now ensconced in the nobleman's bed. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Cinderella - The Truth
pommer on 01-11-2013
Cinderella - The Truth
Hi Luigi,another imaginative well composed tale, as usual. Pommer

Author's Reply:
Glad you liked it, Pommer. Thanks for letting me know.

All the best, Luigi

Pronto on 01-11-2013
Cinderella - The Truth
Well done Luigi a fairy tale dipped in reality. What a mixture.
Loved it.

Author's Reply:
Cheers, Pronto. Having read that sometimes fairy tales were metaphors for sexual matters, I thought that this version might be nearer to the truth than the traditional one. Worth speculating.
Usual thanks for comment and rating.

Luigi

Bozzz on 03-11-2013
Cinderella - The Truth
How come, Luigi, that you are so brilliant at describing below stairs events - you do not make comments on our stuff as a good butler should. They never seem to finish with Sir or Ma'am ! What's going on?...David

Author's Reply:
A bit too cryptic for me, David. What's that bit about Sir or Ma'am?
I very often comment on your stuff when it appeals to me. If it goes above my head I remain neutral and refrain from commenting. Some commentators are more enthusiastic than others.

Cheers.


Mιnage ΰ trois (posted on: 28-10-13)
Not as shocking as it sounds.

It might never happen he said with a laugh. How wrong he was, it already had! She had packed her bags and walked out. She had had enough, she said. Of living in sin. I ask you. Inconsiderate or what? Do I look worried? I don't care a jot and carry on living in perfect harmony with her twin. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Mιnage ΰ trois
deadpoet on 30-10-2013
MΓ©nage Γ  trois
Callous bloke.. amusingly written..

Author's Reply:
All is fair in love and war, so they say. But you are right, Pia, he seems an insensitive bloke.

Luigi x

Bozzz on 30-10-2013
MΓ©nage Γ  trois
By nature, each woman needs two men. The reverse will not work easily - QED. I'm told most women in harems seek the real thing out of bounds....but maybe you know more than I do?... bon voyage...David

Author's Reply:
I grant you that usually that is the case, David, but there is always an exception to the rule.
As for harems I'd stay well clear of them. I haven't the balls to go inside one or rather I wouldn't if I did.
If you catch my drift.
Good of you to give me the benefit of your knowledge. Ta.

Luigi πŸ™‚


Simply A Yarn (posted on: 28-10-13)
A dedicated worker.

It's been years since she last knitted but she is not likely to drop a stitch. A lot of nieces have duly been fitted with garments made without a hitch. It is a skill that one doesn't forget; once learnt, is remembered forever. A common stitch is a flat stockinet, the knack of which is rather clever. By alternating knit stitches and purl simple, plain fabrics can now be made. These words were told to her as a girl and what she heard would never fade. On the occasion of an uncle's birthday the knitting needles were put to good use. Now that there is a baby on the way she could not wish for a better excuse. Out comes the wool and relevant pattern and gets to work with passion and zeal she won't be seen as a slob or a slattern, she wants to show she is the real deal. The style to follow is taken as read: perpendicular wales, known as the weft. She'll do a jacket with some of the thread and a pair of booties with what is left. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Simply A Yarn
franciman on 28-10-2013
Simply A Yarn
This is more than the sum of its parts Luigi.
It made me smile in warm remembrance and so I return to it to repeat the pleasant experience.
cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Thanks for the generous rating and heart-warming comment, Jim. There is nothing like the imminent birth of a grandchild to stir a woman into action.
Cheers,
Luigi

EmotiveSoul on 29-10-2013
Simply A Yarn
Bring's back memories of my childhood and my mum sitting for hours on her old singer sewing machine. Love it.

Author's Reply:
Your comment is so relevant to us of the older generation. My mother was always sewing or knitting at every opportunity. Nowadays young mums prefer to pop in at M&S or Mothercare for immediate results.
Thanks for the feedback.

franciman on 29-10-2013
Simply A Yarn
Our grand-daughter Alexis was born just two weeks ago!
cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Congratulations Jim, our grandchild (gender deliberately unknown) is scheduled for February. It makes me feel very old but that's nothing new. When my daughter was at school she came home and remarked that we were the oldest parents in her class.

Mikeverdi on 29-10-2013
Simply A Yarn
Another Gem from you Luigi. Mike

Author's Reply:
And another sparkling compliment from you, Mike. As always gratefully appreciated.

Luigi:-)

Nemo on 29-10-2013
Simply A Yarn
An enjoyable and effortless read, so adroitly rhymed. Impressive work on knitting vocabulary! Regards, Nemo.

Author's Reply:
Thanks for dropping by.

Best, Luigi

Bozzz on 29-10-2013
Simply A Yarn
Luigi, you have woven the rhymes so skilfully - weaving as well as knitting - a smooth ride and all. Bravo, has my ten too

Author's Reply:
After your superb score, David, should I cast-off or switch to crochet? There seems to be kudos in textiles.
Sex on the other hand appears to be unfasionable as nobody has commented on my other poem 'MΓ©nage Γ  trois'. Well, c'est la vie!

Luigi πŸ™‚

deadpoet on 30-10-2013
Simply A Yarn
I used to knit an awful lot and crochet and sew- now I just batter the keyboard- Sounds like you are quite accomplished on the keyboard Luigi- I'm sure you can match her knitting any day.

Pia πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Everyone has a different skill, Pia. The opportunity is there for all to produce a masterpiece, be it a knitted garment or a piece of writing. Whether we rise to challenge is another matter. I can easily find my way on the keyboard but I am completely useless when it comes to knitting and related activities. We better stick to what we can manage.

Luigi πŸ™‚

Pronto on 31-10-2013
Simply A Yarn
Oh great memories for me here luigi. My ex wife and two daughters could sit, knit and natter without ever dropping a stitch and they'd be watching Corry too! Left me in awe they did!
Thanks for sharing.

Author's Reply:
I can quite believe it, Pronto. It is a well known fact that women can multi-task.
Thanks for reading.


Sweet Tooth (posted on: 25-10-13)
Let him eat CAKE. As per Wednesday's Forum Challenge.

He wasn't at all fat but as thin as a rake although he was fond of a thick slice of cake. He knew what to pick as he was not an oaf; a favourite of his was a date and walnut loaf but he would not say no to a piece of carrot cake as long as his girlfriend was in the mood to bake. She was quite an expert and would usually buy bananas, toffee, biscuits to make Banoffee pie. They lasted a long while but eventually did part; she was from Bakewell and reminded him of a tart. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Sweet Tooth
Mikeverdi on 26-10-2013
Sweet Tooth
This gave me my morning laugh, loved it; I can face the dreary day now. Thanks Luigi. Mike

Author's Reply:
Thanks to you, Mike, for reading and commenting. Buoyed up by your nice comment I can look forward to a good weekend.


Dirty Tricks (posted on: 21-10-13)
Inspired by the word ostentator which was the prompt in last Wednesday's Forum challenge.

I have my own views as I am a commentator but I flatly refuse to be labelled ostentator. I am often accused of rhetorical bombast, a notion that surely I have to lambast. I disclaim it this instant, I am no procrastinator, nor will I skirt the issue like a prevaricator. My fiercest opponent, a notorious agitator, is a known troublemaker and a noxious instigator. I recognise the signs of a smooth operator; and feel I have to expose the cunning perpetrator. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Dirty Tricks
Texasgreg on 22-10-2013
Dirty Tricks
I see it's a slow week all-in-all, Luigi. Since I only have time for one right now, I chose yours as the word had slipped my memory. This was a super attempt at the subject, and one that I would have liked to do if I but had time. Aye! I see your two-edge sword being thrust about in attempt of reflection.

Greg πŸ™‚

 photo Gunspincowboy.gif

Author's Reply:
Hi Greg, nice to hear from you. I imagined you were busy as you haven't posted for a few months. When time is at a premium it is difficult trying to read all the entries and I feel fortunate that you happened to pick on mine. Yes, it would be great to see your contributions in the Forum challenge. It is fun to take part and good work can come out of it. It only remains to me to thank you for your feedback.

Best, Luigi πŸ™‚

Mikeverdi on 22-10-2013
Dirty Tricks
You are so clever Luigi, well done! Mike

Author's Reply:
Mike you are always generous with your praise. I can't thank you enough. It was a bit of fun writing.

Luigi πŸ™‚

ValDohren on 22-10-2013
Dirty Tricks
Clearly you are the investigator of the poetry infiltrator.
Val

Author's Reply:
Indeed I am Val. Then I will be his exterminator even if I have to follow him to the equator. I assume that it is a 'he'; a lady could not possibly be such a manipulator.

Luigi x

P.S. Thanks for the plug. Cheers.

Bozzz on 23-10-2013
Dirty Tricks
See you later, perpetrator - sorry ! Very nicely done my friend. 'There's real clever' - as your Welsh friends will say...David.

Author's Reply:
What's happened to the 'alligator'?
How did you know about my Welsh friends? Although not a Welshman and not resident in Wales, I belong to a Welsh writers' group.

bo_duke99 on 23-10-2013
Dirty Tricks
trying to tease a hidden story out of this, nicely tightly rhymed and timed

Author's Reply:
Sorry, no hidden story Duke. Just playing with words. Thanks for looking in.

Pronto on 24-10-2013
Dirty Tricks
Excellent wordplay Luigi and entertaining as always. Good write mate.

Author's Reply:
I am all for the lighter touch Pronto. It is usually well received. Thanks for comment and rating.

Luigi πŸ™‚


Candide (posted on: 18-10-13)
Candide revisited.

I recently re-read Voltaire's Candide which recounts the adventures and travels that he did with the preceptor Pangloss, in search of Cunegonde, a girl who could either be brunette or blonde, an interesting fact that we are not told. Yet we know that the lass is seventeen years old. We are also informed she's comely and desirable as well, as we shall see, prone to be fallible. The work is caustic and satirical, the plot somewhat picaresque and the depiction of life in El Dorado picturesque. The belief that ''all is for the best in the best of all possible worlds'' is once and for all laid to rest by the events described therein. The message is that optimism must be tempered by reality a fact finally accepted by Candide, a man hardened by calamity, who's grown into maturity from a naοve, callow youth. One who's seen the light and acknowledged the truth . © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Candide
franciman on 18-10-2013
Candide
Hi Luigi,
A philosophical tale in a nutshell! You do this kind of thing so well.
Really enjoyed,
Jim

Author's Reply:
This potted version can hardly do justice to Voltaire's novel but I hope it gives a flavour of it.
Your comment is a boost to my morale, Jim. Thanks for that.
Luigi

mageorge on 20-10-2013
Candide
You are the master, I am but a student, Luigi.

Enough said!

Mark.



Author's Reply:
Steady on, Mark! Whilst I appreciate your confidence, it may be true to say that I am a Jack of all trades but master of none. As a matter of fact I am the eternal student learning more every day.
Thanks for your kind words.
Luigi.

Andrea on 21-10-2013
Candide
Great stuff, Luigi - loved Candide!

Author's Reply:
Cheers Andrea. I tought you would.

Luigi x


First Steps (posted on: 14-10-13)
Come, and trip it as you go On the light fantastic toe.        Milton - L'Allegro, 1645

The record on the stereo spins round. I pay attention to its melodious sound because I want to synchronise my feet with the rhythmical and recurring beat. The steps I'm taking should be simple but I've been distracted by her dimple. I tread on her toes and say I'm sorry, I'm told it doesn't matter, don't worry. The trouble is that the more I think the more likely I am to be out of sync. She guides me on the floor with verve; at the moment I'm on a learning curve and, although all I seem to do is prance, I may eventually learn how to dance. Not like Nijinski, Fonteyn or all that lot but proficient enough to do a foxtrot. I once thought that music was schmaltz yet when I hear a good Viennese waltz I rehearse those steps in triple time - I believe the 'Blue Danube' is sublime. I forgot to mention that I am in love but I reaffirm what I have said above, that dancing has become part of me and it was all thanks to my bride-to-be. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for First Steps
Bozzz on 14-10-2013
First Steps
Reminds me of my own perilous adventure into the Come Dancing scene, but I am sure with those beautiful lady tutors I would have ended up in trouble. How come you were drawn only to the dimples? The measured hesitations are well drawn.
Loved it ....David

Author's Reply:
I can imagine the perils awaiting one on the Come Dancing scene, David. In my younger days I had a few mishaps myself. On one occasion my partner was so tall that my nose was buried in her bosom.
It is more decorous, though perhaps less interesting, to look at the lady's dimple than at her cleavage.
That's what I thought at the time; I'm wiser now.
Cheers.

mageorge on 14-10-2013
First Steps
Can't bloody dance meself, Luigi. But then again, coming from Lancashire, who can?
Loved the idea of you being attracted by the dimples... I won't, out of respect, go into what i would be attracted by.

Great little poem, my friend.

Regards,
Mark.

Author's Reply:
I can sympathise, Mark, I too have two left feet when it comes to dancing. As for what I am attracted to, dimples are just the starting point of a downward journey.

Best, Luigi.

deadpoet on 15-10-2013
First Steps
Never did this kind of dancing- just moved to the beat of rock and roll like the old hippie I am. This sounds serious Luigi- glad you put your best foot forward. Nice little poem.

Pia πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Dear Pia, you have to take anything I say with a pinch of salt. I was never into ballroom dancing and the only music that drew me to the dance floor was the smoochy type.
As for the poem, you know what they say: "The events described are the work of the author's imagination".
I would have liked to have met you in your hippie days when the mantra was 'make love, not war'.

Luigi x


Low Voltage & High Prices (posted on: 14-10-13)
SSE to raise gas and electricity prices by 8.2%

There is something wrong, I keep getting a shock. The energy companies are talking poppycock: ''The wholesale cost of fuel is once more on the rise so to ensure supplies we must do likewise''. They follow one another in putting up the price and that, you must admit, is not very nice. Ed made a suggestion: ''let's have a freeze'', but David dismissed it saying it was a wheeze. Opinions may differ on who has got it right but, looking at the bills, I know I get a fright. We can ask ourselves 'Why?' and 'What if' yet end up bankrupt as well as frozen stiff. © Luigi Pagano 2013 * First published on Poetry24 *
Archived comments for Low Voltage & High Prices
Bozzz on 14-10-2013
Low Voltage & High Prices
As an SSE customer, I am moving to another source, but we all know that today's hiding place is tomorrow's torture chamber.
Income from our solar panels used to pay the heating bill, but that is all out of the window now. Nice poem Luigi, lousy tidings ! ..David

Author's Reply:
I am afraid there is no respite David. Wherever you go they are going to follow suite sooner or later and you won't be better off.
Are you a new user of solar panels? I have had them for three years now and I am well in pocket and they pay my heating bills twice over.
Don't despair.

Luigi

mageorge on 14-10-2013
Low Voltage & High Prices
Yes, Luigi. The price went up in anticipation of the freeze. The greedy b'''''d energy companies weren't going to let that one slip through their fingers. Cameron dismissed it as a 'wheeze,' but the increase went ahead, anyway. Reminds me of the time some companies received big pay-outs to pass onto customers, but forgot to do it. I had an out-standing bill of Β£11.00 a couple of years ago... I got letter after letter and a threat of court action, ha...ha. I could have paid it 1000 times over, but i let them carry on. Unfortunately, some customers don't have that luxury.



A very true to life and important message... Well done!



P.S. I'm not paying my next bill πŸ™‚



All the best,

Mark.

Author's Reply:
Well said, Mark. We have to re-VOLT and AMP-ly demonstrate our opposition to such behaviour, WATT?
I shouldn't be facetious, it is a serious matter but we seem to be unable to do anything about it.

Best, Luigi.

Weefatfella on 14-10-2013
Low Voltage & High Prices
 photo 89f4a5d0-5f15-4509-881e-443a08debcc5_zps272a8411.jpg
Capitalist buggerers. Well said Luigi Hear-Hear.
Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
Indeed they are, Paul. And what's more they couldn't give a toss about our moaning. It's apparent they don't have any problem about sleeping at night.

Luigi.


House Hunting (posted on: 11-10-13)
Viewing a property.

Through a gap in the fence they had a peep at the back garden and the mess that they saw made their resolve harden. Rotting apples on the ground and the lawn was overgrown; all were signs of neglect. They should have known. They wondered if this was the correct address. The girl at the front door wore an electric blue dress. She was not the house owner but a pretty young au pair with long legs, deep blue eyes and silky golden hair. She had dressed in a hurry with her clothes looking creased. She was also barefoot and did not seem too pleased. 'The missus is out shopping and the master is in bed. It's more than my job's worth to let you in', she said. 'You see, the estate agents have chosen the wrong day. You came on a wild goose chase because they led you astray.' © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for House Hunting
deadpoet on 11-10-2013
House Hunting
The garden is the least of their worries-

Author's Reply:
Yes Pia, I can imagine their shock if they had gone inside the house.

Luigi x

pommer on 11-10-2013
House Hunting
Hi Luigi,I can see the scene, wonderfully expressed.I bet the master was cursing being disturbed,
.Made me laugh.Be lucky Pommer

Author's Reply:
One can sense the master's displeasure by the au pair's reaction at the door, Pommer. Glad that the poem amused you. Keep smiling.

mageorge on 13-10-2013
House Hunting
I'm glad i caught this in time, Luigi. So true of an experience i once had whilst house hunting.

Great read, as usual.

Regards,
Mark



Author's Reply:
Hello Mark. A remarkable coincidence. It reminds me of this joke:
A man was showing the rooms of his house to prospective buyers. 'This is the kitchen, this is the dining room, this is the bedroom....' and on opening the bedroom's door he saw his wife in bed with her lover. Without hesitation he continued, 'and that's me with my wife.'
Thanks for reading and giving this poem the seal of approval.

Best, Luigi


A Stormy Relationship (posted on: 07-10-13)
From A to Z. A gamut of emotions.

Arguments and altercations at first But making up afterwards is great. Compromising is not an easy option Due to our obsessive obduracy. Explosive our relationship may be, Failure though is not what we wish, Give and take is the order of the day Having agreed on a code of conduct. I think that she's sensitive and caring Judging by the affection she shows. Keen as I am to hold on to her Last thing I want is to misbehave. My own attitude could improve, No man can say he is beyond reproach. Others who say that they are diligent Perhaps follow a positive approach. Quite how I can change for the better Remains a strong challenge for me Seeing that my temperament is fiery. To meditate could prove to be the key. Ultimately we shall mature and mellow, Vexatious disagreements will cease Without disrupting our peaceful life Xanthippe she might have been in the past Yet she's now lovey-dovey and sweet. Zealous yes but in a pleasant way. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for A Stormy Relationship
deadpoet on 07-10-2013
A Stormy Relationship
Very clever indeed Luigi- Had to look Xanthippe up- now you have made me wiser- I love that.
Pia πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
I always thought of you as a wise person, Pia. Now that you are wiser, so much the better.

Luigi x

barenib on 07-10-2013
A Stormy Relationship
I wondered how some of those near the end were going to go - but as usual you've come up trumps! John.

Author's Reply:
There is often a way round to get to the desired outcome, John, but it gets a bit awkward as you reach the tail end. It helps that I had done a similar exercise in the past - see 'Chalk and Cheese'.

Hope you are keeping well.
All the best, Luigi.

Weefatfella on 07-10-2013
A Stormy Relationship
 photo 89f4a5d0-5f15-4509-881e-443a08debcc5_zps272a8411.jpg
Brilliant Luigi and challenging I can see.
Congrats on the nib.
Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
Many thanks Paul.

Mikeverdi on 07-10-2013
A Stormy Relationship
Another well conceived piece from you Luigi, you always entertain us. Congrats on a well earned Nib. Mike

Author's Reply:
Entertainment is the name of the game, Mike. I believe that the writers' on this site write to entertain and interest the readers as well as for personal satisfaction. I try my best - not always succeeding - but I persevere.
Thanks for your support, Luigi.

Pelequin23 on 08-10-2013
A Stormy Relationship
very impressive takes skill to stick to the pattern of letters

Author's Reply:
Hi P. This kind of poem may seem difficult but all it takes is patience and a little thought on how to use the letters of the alphabet at the beginning of each line and make the poem sound meaningful.
I am grateful to you for the generous rating and comment. Thanks.

ChairmanWow on 08-10-2013
A Stormy Relationship
A fun poetic dissertation on getting along. Maybe you could come across the pond and recite it in front of our congress.

Ralph

Author's Reply:
I am flattered, Ralph, but I doubt that my powers of persuasion are strong enough to shift the determined opposition of your congress. From what I can gather getting along is not on their list of priorities.

Luigi

Kipper on 10-10-2013
A Stormy Relationship
Dead easy, huh!

Until I tried it myself!

Great writing and great of words, especially the X. My dictionary couldn't find it but I'll definately give you the benefit of the doubt.

Kipper

Author's Reply:
Kipper, many thanks for the feedback.
I found the following definition on Dictionary.com:

World English Dictionary
Xanthippe or Xantippe (zΓ¦nˈθɪpɪ, zΓ¦nˈtɪpɪ)
β€” n
1. the wife of Socrates, proverbial as a scolding and quarrelsome woman
2. any nagging, peevish, or irritable woman

Best regards, Luigi

pommer on 13-10-2013
A Stormy Relationship
Well done Luigi, I know how difficult this can be, having published something of the same nature in the past.Brilliant work.entertaining as usual. Be lucky, Pommer.

Author's Reply:
Having done it once I thought it would be a doddle to do it again but it is just as difficult, as you have also experienced.
Thanks once again for commenting on my work.

Cheers, Luigi.


The Magician (posted on: 07-10-13)
One trick too many.

The audience had been enthralled by prestidigitation and clever tricks. Three times he had been recalled to the proscenium to great applause acknowledged by him with magnanimity but in the crowd there were also those who saw him as the deluded emperor who was sure he wore invisible clothes. He offered the people renewed hope by showing them how to reconnect two broken strands of a severed rope. Then all of a sudden the magic wore off; as the audience grew more disenchanted there were loud whisperings and coughs. The very same followers he had wooed pilloried him for exercising deceit and so the great magician was booed. He looked for a rabbit in his top hat, or a dove, but nothing could be found, knew he'd lost his touch and that was that. © Luigi Pagano 2013 * First published on Poetry24 *
Archived comments for The Magician
dylan on 07-10-2013
The Magician
Very nice, Luigi-could be written for Tony Blair.
(Or any politician, come to that!)

Orrabest,

D.

Author's Reply:
You got it in one, Jon, it was written about a politician. A foreign one, Berlusconi, but you are right it could apply to a lot of politicians.
Thanks for the comment,
Luigi.

Weefatfella on 07-10-2013
The Magician
 photo 89f4a5d0-5f15-4509-881e-443a08debcc5_zps272a8411.jpg

"Prestidigitation."
Good God Luigi, I hadn't a clue, I had to google that one.
People can only hide behind a persona for so long.
Before the mirrors steam over and reveal the truth.
Nice one Luigi.
Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
Funny you should say that, Paul. My wife asked the same question. Sleight of hand, I said, EVERYBODY knows that! It looks as if I have to reconsider my statement: the meaning isn't widely known. Well, I blame my teachers.
Thanks, Luigi.

Bozzz on 07-10-2013
The Magician
And the salesman and the priest and the doctor and the husband - let's call it of much of the human race shall we? Clever, Luigi. You have fooled me into a 9 !

Author's Reply:
I know that you are not easily fooled, David. A 9? It looks as if I have pulled a rabbit out of a hat after all.
Cheers.

Pelequin23 on 08-10-2013
The Magician
people like nothing more than to see a hero fall but in this case the fall was deserved

Author's Reply:
People in authorithy who get too big for their boots, sooner or later will get their comeuppance.
Thanks for stopping by and leaving a comment.

Mikeverdi on 08-10-2013
The Magician
Just brilliant Luigi, I think I would have given a Nib for this one if I were in charge. You captured it all so well, I always likened them to jugglers, trying to keep the balls in the air; when they fall... the magic is over and the curtain comes down.
Mike

Author's Reply:
I accept with great pleasure your 'virtual' Nib, Mike. Glad that you liked this piece so much that you wished to give me that accolade. I am satisfied if my work is enjoyed and appreciated, as in this instance.
Thanks very much for your feedback and rating.

Cheers, Luigi.

deadpoet on 09-10-2013
The Magician
I think everyone has their moment of glory Luigi- but when the villians fall they get what they deserve whereas the good guys retire with honour. A very apt analogy with the Magician. Very clever.

Pia

Author's Reply:
Let's all boo the villains. Good job we are on the side of the angels, Pia - or so I believe - and not likely to suffer recriminations.

Luigi x


Poems For Every Occasion (posted on: 04-10-13)
3/10/2013 - National Poetry Day. Let's scribble.

There are many ways to inspire the Muse and to compose poems for every occasion; you can describe an object that people use or write of the misfortunes of a nation. You can hear gossip, you've nothing to lose, or overhear someone else's conversation. Alternatively switch the TV on for the news to learn about inflation and stagnation. You will watch some pundits or a boffin who will warn you of the hazards or the risk of ailments that carry one to an early coffin (so don't have unsafe sex with an odalisque). You are cognisant with the fact that today is the annual challenge for good poetry. You'll write an ode that's serious but not gay, you don't want to be accused of coquetry. This year the competition's theme is 'water' and you think that that prompt is divine. Your thoughts then turn to your daughter whose favourite everyday tipple is wine. All of a sudden the inspiration will vanish, you cogitate for ages and watch the clock; to put something on paper is your wish but realise that you have got writer's block. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Poems For Every Occasion
deadpoet on 04-10-2013
Poems For Every Occasion
You certainly didn't have Writer's Block with this one Luigi- nice one..

Pia


Author's Reply:
Thanks Pia. Thankfully I was able to avoid the dreaded block. Perhaps being National Poetry Day acted as a spur.

Luigi x


Water, Water Everywhere (posted on: 04-10-13)
3/10/2013 - National Poetry Day. The theme is WATER.

I am reminded of an ancient joke attributed to a very clever bloke sent to Venice on an assignment who wired home a witty comment: 'All streets flooded, please advise'. This, today, doesn't cause a surprise; the situation is far from banal, high tides swell the Grand Canal and water fills St. Mark's Square. The sight is more than one can bear. People are made to walk the plank, with resignation, their expression blank; the danger is that one is marooned. On the canals the traffic's ballooned with gondolas crowding the waterway and water taxis unwilling to give way. Though this upheaval is inconvenient, we know the Serenissima is resilient. These problems should make us think, we forget that the City may one day sink. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Water, Water Everywhere
deadpoet on 04-10-2013
Water, Water Everywhere
What a brilliant contribution to NPD-

Author's Reply:
Thanks once again Pia.

Luigi x

Andrea on 04-10-2013
Water, Water Everywhere
Loved it, Luigi!

Author's Reply:
Good-oh, ta.

Luigi x

amman on 05-10-2013
Water, Water Everywhere
This took me there, Luigi. Many a true word. I've a friend who visited Venice recently and he was less than impressed with some aspects of the sinking city.
Cheers.
Tony.

Author's Reply:
Yes Tony, Venice affects everyone differently. Personally, I have a great regard for the old city even though, on one of my visits, the water busses were idle because of a strike and I had to do a lot of walking.
Thanks for stopping by.

Luigi.

Bozzz on 05-10-2013
Water, Water Everywhere
As you say, London too is on Water's priority list for immersion - or should we say man's own list? Submarines needed on the tube lines ---bubble bubble, toil and trouble - the three witches had it right...So well put, Luigi.

Author's Reply:
Don't worry, David, the two old ladies have endured a lot of upheavals over the centuries and I am sure they will survive for a few more years. (Famous last words.)


The Ghost (posted on: 27-09-13)
In the churchyard at the witching hour. (My entry to the weekly challenge).

It was nearly midnight as I approached the grave of a notorious villain and felt very brave. We all knew that in the past he had killed but escaped detection because he was skilled at covering his tracks. He was never caught but got his comeuppance in a duel he fought. His tomb was inscribed with the rascal's name and on a marble slab flickered an eternal flame. Buried in sacred ground he still could find no peace; the clash of deathly blades was a din that didn't cease. At the stroke of midnight his ghost tried to flee the crypt in which he lay and regain his liberty. He floated in the air but could not leave the plot, chains restrained his ankles: he was rooted to the spot. I am descended from the guy who punished him so he wished to slaughter me but his chances were too slim. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for The Ghost
Bozzz on 28-09-2013
The Ghost
Luigi, were you right to mess with crooks and vampires - for that is what it sounds like? Where is he buried? Scary piece - enjoyed the read ....David.

Author's Reply:
It's always a dodgy business dealing with the paranormal, David. Good job we don't live in the Middle Ages or we'd be accused of witchcraft. In my case the phantoms are in my imagination. They seem to hold a fascination for me as I have written a few poems on the topic but I am not a Wiccan.
Thanks for reading and commenting.


A Helping Hand (posted on: 16-09-13)
Edinburgh Zoo's female panda Tian Tian could give birth this month.

 photo panda_zps232f0316.jpg With black circles around her eyes she has no trouble attracting guys but can't excite her current mate. Yet Mother Nature cannot wait. If one can't achieve what is desired a helping hand may be required. When the male has no inclination one must resort to insemination. Our female was given that treat once it was obvious she was on heat. The procedure was quick and slick and with any luck it's done the trick. She looks well, eats plenty of food but seems to be in a funny mood. Her behaviour is quite significant, it could mean she's finally pregnant. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for A Helping Hand
deadpoet on 16-09-2013
A Helping Hand
That's pretty amazing that you just can find the right words and rhyme- well done Luigi.. a nice little picture of a Panda's life..

Pia

Author's Reply:
Thanks very much, Pia, for your kind words. Sorry for the late reply: I was on holiday.

Luigi x

Weefatfella on 16-09-2013
A Helping Hand
 photo 89f4a5d0-5f15-4509-881e-443a08debcc5_zps272a8411.jpg
Ha!
Expertly done Luigi. Black eyes do not only attract Bears.
 photo blackeyes_zps317d98e9.jpg
Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
Dear Paul, even I would be enchanted by such soulful eyes. Have you got her telephone number handy?
Cheers.

Andrea on 19-09-2013
A Helping Hand
Haha, artificial insemination, how dull! Nice one Luigi - hope your hols were good!

Author's Reply:
I catch your drift, Andrea; not very romantic nor pleasurable but when needs must...
Yes, thanks, had a good holiday and the weather was perfect. I should have stayed longer but the lure of UKA drew me back.

Luigi x


Keeping One's Nerve (posted on: 13-09-13)
***

You ask me how I knew that you had WMDs. I reply with ease: I sold them to you. The nerve gas that you hide cannot be denied but you swear blind that it isn't true that the deadly release was done by you. We say we will find the evidence we need but we have to concede we haven't any proof and certain objectors are hitting the roof at the thought we might intervene in the fight. All combatants think that they are in the right but they must realize that gas gets in your eyes (and the body and the lung) like the smoke in the song that's often been sung. © Luigi Pagano 2013 *First published on Poetry24*
Archived comments for Keeping One's Nerve
roger303 on 15-09-2013
Keeping Ones Nerve
Why hasn't anyone commented?
It is frustrating when people can't be bothered to do so (for whatever reason) particularly when the submission is as good as this.
Topical, political and well penned.
I think the line "(and the body and the lung)" is unecessary .. and seems a little clumsy, IMHO - but, what do I know?!
Thanks for posting it.
Regards
Roger

Author's Reply:
I appreciate your concern, Roger, and thank you for it but sometimes, with the volume of postings - especially of late - a piece can easily be overlooked.
I agree that a poem can be cumbersome with unnecessary lines and editing it might improve it. The reason I used that particular line, apart from rhyming with 'sung', was to emphasise the toxicity of nerve gas which affects not only the eyes but the whole body.
Many thanks for taking the time to offer me your views which are always very welcome.

Luigi



Rumpus in Olympus (posted on: 09-09-13)
The camera makers Olympus are to be prosecuted by the Serious Fraud Office for providing "misleading, false or deceptive" accounts.

What has Zeus got up to now? We have heard that in Olympus there has been an almighty row. We know what caused the rumpus that made us think of Greek deity: it was a run-of-the-mill fraud committed not by gods but laity. Three men, who sat on the board of a company, cooked the books; they provided misleading accounts, were exposed and labelled crooks and found guilty on many counts. The UK's SFO sees the need to prosecute the responsible group whose inaccuracies, and greed, have landed them in the soup. The axiom 'the camera does not lie' doesn't seem to apply to its makers who were found untruthful and sly and without any doubt lawbreakers. © Luigi Pagano 2013 *Also published on Poetry24 -7/9/2013 *
Archived comments for Rumpus in Olympus
deadpoet on 09-09-2013
Rumpus in Olympus
What a marvellous way to read the news in rhyme. Much enjoyed.

Author's Reply:
Hello Pia. It took me a while to click on the fact that you are the one with a 'high hat'. Nice to hear from you.
I last posted on the other site before the facelift.
This poem is one I first published on http://poetry-24.blogspot.co.uk/ which is a website that accepts solely poems based on news items. They even suggest possible prompts. Have a look, you might find it interesting.
Meanwhile, thank very much for your comment.

Luigi x

Mikeverdi on 10-09-2013
Rumpus in Olympus
Most enjoyable Luigi, a job awaits you at the Times; increased circulation assured. Mike

Author's Reply:
Very flattering, Mike, but I think the 'Dandy' would be more up my street.
Cheers.


Sweet-talk (posted on: 06-09-13)
My entry to the weekly Forum challenge. The word was FLANNEL.

Jim informs us that across the Channel we are likely to get quite a bit of flannel. I'm not being evasive nor do I wish to flatter, I've come to the conclusion it doesn't really matter. Nod as if you agree and listen with grace; behaving in this way you won't lose any face. But take everything with a pinch of salt, maintain your sang-froid and sip a single malt. Show everyone what it is to be a Brit: amenable but also a chap who has some grit. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Sweet-talk
deadpoet on 06-09-2013
Sweet-talk
Like the rhyme and the poignant dignity- very much.

Author's Reply:
Glad you liked this, deadpoet. Many thanks for letting me know.
I wrote it in response to the Forum Weekly Challenge - see [https://ukauthors.com/phorum5/list.php?54].
Why don't you join us in the fun?

amman on 07-09-2013
Sweet-talk
Nice one, Luigi. I'm nodding even as I sip a single malt.
Cheers.
Tony.

Author's Reply:
Hi Tony, I hope that you are nodding in agreement and not being soporiific due to the malt and the dullness of this poem. Anyway it seems that you have kept awake long enough to write a comment. Thanks.

Bozzz on 07-09-2013
Sweet-talk
Flannelle - c'est une fabrique - hence fabrication - hence lies - hence tissue, hence we all fall down. I flounder. In such circumstances I have learned only one useful word - incroyable - it solves all needs from amazement to disbelief.

Author's Reply:
I agree, David. Incroyable is a good word to use when one one wants to sit on the fence and not commit to a definite opinion. Incredible? You better believe it.

Best, Luigi.

cooky on 08-09-2013
Sweet-talk
written as a true Brit. Love the tone in this one.

Author's Reply:
I say, old chap, jolly decent of you. Thank you and toodle pip.


60 Plus (posted on: 02-09-13)
Life and old dogs.

When I'm offered a seat on the bus, although I think of myself as young, I am made aware my age is 60 plus. I am relaxed and not highly-strung; tempus fugit at an increasing pace, we must keep up or else go to seed. Stamina is needed in this long race, one mustn't run at breakneck speed. Life is a marathon and not a sprint so we must conserve our energy. We worked hard and did our stint and unlikely to succumb to lethargy. We might be old but know the ropes so we are not afraid of responsibility. Wrinklies like me retain their hopes that people recognise their creativity. Don't think we are gaga and dribble: we are proud to be of a sound mind, we use our imagination and scribble about the past that we've left behind. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for 60 Plus
Mikeverdi on 02-09-2013
60 Plus
Guilty as charged! Mike

Author's Reply:
Most of us are in the same boat, Mike.

Andrea on 02-09-2013
60 Plus
You get offered seats on the bus?! Jeez, I haven't been offered a seat on a bus (or tram) since I was pregnant, and that was 24 years ago πŸ™‚

Lovely pome, Luigi.

Author's Reply:
Well, they wouldn't offer a seat to a young thing like you but to an old fogey like me they only have to look at my white hair and decide that I'm over the hill. Why, I was travelling by train the other week and a young Chinese girl gave me a hand in placing my luggage on the overhead rack. Sometimes it pays to look feeble to see the smile on the attractive helper.

Luigi x

amman on 03-09-2013
60 Plus
Top form with this one, Luigi. Many a true word. Now that I've gone gaga I just post silly verses on UKA.
Cheers.
Tony.

Author's Reply:
Console yourself Tony. There are loads of young people who write silly verses too. At least our silliness is more mature.
Cheers, Luigi.

cooky on 03-09-2013
60 Plus
Wise words indeed .I particularly like the last two lines. reminds me of the stilton and port after a very good meal.

Author's Reply:
What better conclusion to a good repast than stilton and port? Pass the decanter my friend (and ask the ladies to stay).
Thanks for your comment and rating, cooky.


A Westminster's Jingle (posted on: 02-09-13)
In March of this year Junior Transport Minister Norman Baker released a pop single with his band The Reform Club.

Politicians want us to dance to their tune. To their orchestrations No one is immune. I think their only purpose, and it is not by chance, is to confuse the electorate and lead us a merry dance. The coalition acts in concert, seems united and upbeat yet the leaders don't sing from a singular hymn sheet. Now a Lib-Dem minister wants us all to commingle, have a party with his party, by releasing a pop single. I don't really understand this Member's rationale; his politics may be serious but his song is too banal. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for A Westminster's Jingle
amman on 02-09-2013
A Westminsters Jingle
You must be joking. Was it grunge or rap or some other obscure (so called) form of music. We know politicians like the sound of their own voices (lies) but, really...
Well penned, Luigi.

Author's Reply:
By all accounts he didn't get very far with that enterprise, Tony. The record was slated by the cognoscenti and he returned to obscurity - musically speaking. Whether he'll shine in politics is a matter of debate.

Nomenklatura on 07-09-2013
A Westminsters Jingle

Many a true word spoken in jest, Luigi.

'No matter who you vote for,
the government always gets in.'
Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band

regards Ewan

Author's Reply:
Hi Ewan. I can't understand how the government always gets in as I don't vote. It must be a fiddle.
Cheers. πŸ™‚


My Friend Geoff (posted on: 30-08-13)
This was intended for the Forum challenge (the prompt was Convenience) but it missed the boat. Here it is for your delectation.

Without his hearing aid my very good friend Geoff doesn't perceive a sound, in fact he's almost deaf. To communicate with him proves to be an experience; I told him I would meet him at his earliest convenience, the reply that he gave me is one I won't forget: he said that he would wait outside the station toilet. 'It's the nearest convenience' was the remark he made. But still he can't accept that he needs a hearing aid. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for My Friend Geoff
Bozzz on 30-08-2013
My Friend Geoff
Hi Luigi. I realise that the deafness is obliquely relevant to the piece, but to be deaf and to refuse to wear a hearing aid is of course anti-social behaviour - inconvenient to the public.
....Greetings ...David

Author's Reply:
Hi David. I know some people who keep saying 'Pardon?' during a conversation. It could be that they are too vain to wear a hearing aid or they genuinely believe they don't need one. Either way it does prove difficult to communicate and might lead to misunderstanding.

Best, Luigi.

franciman on 30-08-2013
My Friend Geoff
Hi Luigi,
A lesson in economy. A simple tale that shows us the inherent danger that lurks in even mundane misunderstanding.
OK, its also a great wee read!
cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Jim, you are a gentleman. Ready to give a kind and supportive word. Much appreciated, thanks.
The 'Great read' was totally unexpected but welcome.

Luigi πŸ™‚

Weefatfella on 30-08-2013
My Friend Geoff
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Ha! Minteeed.
Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
Paul, I'm not sufficiently conversant with the Scottish jargon but I suspect it is something to do with deafness. Correct me if I'm wrong.

Cheers, Luigi.

Pronto on 02-09-2013
My Friend Geoff
Ha Ha Luigi I'm borderline needing a hearing aid only vanity and a refusal to accept old age prevent me from getting one!
Witty write mat well done.

Author's Reply:
Vanity can be overcome nowadays, Pronto. Invisible hearing aids built inside glasses' frames are available, so I am told. So that's sorted unless you don't wear glasses. As for old age I am a believer in the old adage that you are as old as you feel - See my poem '60 Plus'.
Thanks for reading and commenting.

Mikeverdi on 02-09-2013
My Friend Geoff
Okay, I give up. The whole family tell me I need one...and now you πŸ™‚ Ha Ha! Great read Luigi. Mike

Author's Reply:
I find myself saying 'Pardon?' a bit more often. I wonder if I am joining the brigade of hard of hearing.
Will keep a check on the situation.
Cheers.

Andrea on 02-09-2013
My Friend Geoff
Nice one, Luigi - what was that you said??

(Pssst, have you sent in your 'permission to publish' for the anth?)

Author's Reply:
Listen very carefully: I shall say this only once. Do I look bovvered? No, because I am not on 'your black list' - See 'So who wants to be published, then?'.
Literally speaking, I haven't given my permission but have given my consent. That'll do you?

Luigi xxx

amman on 02-09-2013
My Friend Geoff
Very good, Luigi. I thought the challenge word would bring out some lavatorial humour, but yours was more than that if I hear you correctly.
Cheers.
Tony.

Author's Reply:
The challenge word was convenient, Tony, to highlight how misunderstandings can easily happen. Especially if the aural function is somewhat deficient.

Cheers, Luigi.


A Nation in Crisis (posted on: 26-08-13)
Witnessing a country in danger of self-destruction.

In the land of Pharaohs there is confrontation and opposing factions are dividing the nation. One side had made the initial protest but now the country is facing unrest. The opponents claim that their policy is best and to govern once more is their earnest request. Tanks are on the streets to make the conflict cease but for the time being there's no prospect of peace. There should be harmony under a united flag but bullets are the cause of many a body bag. Against the military there's been a backlash, their fierce clampdown is condemned as rash. The current situation amounts to idiocy, there's only one solution and that's diplomacy. © Luigi Pagano 2013 *First published on Poetry24*
Archived comments for A Nation in Crisis
barenib on 26-08-2013
A Nation in Crisis
We all know that diplomacy it the best way, but it's so often the last resort unhappily. Well observed Luigi - John.

Author's Reply:
Nice to hear from you, John. It is a good sign and it means that you are recovering well from your ordeal.

Best wishes, Luigi.

Bozzz on 26-08-2013
A Nation in Crisis
It seems religions profess love and peace but stir men to conflict. But the conflicts are mostly about power. Our Allah is mightier than your Allah and power is land, assets and the money they generate. It appears to be the same with different forms of Christianity. Sadly diplomacy is a poor drug when the disease is religion and lust for power combined. ... You sum up the hopelessness for many, Luigi .......plus ca change. ...David

Author's Reply:
You are so right, David. As far as religions are concerned, common sense goes out of the window and extremism takes over with every side claiming that God is on their side. What happened to 'turning the other cheek'?

Bradene on 27-08-2013
A Nation in Crisis
The whole of the Arab world is in turmoil, one wonders where it will all end. My own feeling is 'Badly and not before we are all dragged once more into a terrible war. God help us all. Hope you are well Luigi. Love Valx

Author's Reply:
Yes Val, all the signs are there and interventions will make the situation worse in my opinion.
I am well, thank you, and hope the same for you.

Luigi xx

Nemo on 27-08-2013
A Nation in Crisis
Your poem voices all our anxiety and despair. If they're not ready for democracy (strangely called 'the tyranny of the people') they'll have to have the tyranny of dictatorship. Thanks for posting this. Gerald

Author's Reply:
Much obliged for your comment and rating, Gerald.

Nemo on 27-08-2013
A Nation in Crisis
Apologies, Ionicus, I should not have rated your poem, should I? Blame Bozzz.

Author's Reply:
A rating is OK, Gerald. It is the so called 'critique' that I object to, when people re-write your poem to show you how it is done.

Luigi πŸ™‚

amman on 28-08-2013
A Nation in Crisis
Yes, nicely observed, Luigi. Bozzz sums it up well. We ain't seen nothing yet. The domino effect is in full swing. Wait until the US start bombing Syria and the whole of the middle east is affected. Religion, politics - what's the difference?! All about power and its benefits and poor old diplomacy is the last resort that isn't really cutting it at the moment. Rant over.
Cheers.
Tony.

Author's Reply:
Wait until the US start bombing Syria, you say. Oh, they'll do that alright as they have been planning it since 2011; see the wikileaks' memo
https://wikileaks.org/gifiles/docs/1671459_insight-military-intervention-in-syria-post-withdrawal.html

Regards, Luigi


Elmore Leonard (posted on: 23-08-13)
Elmore Leonard, the prolific crime novelist dies aged 87.

At creating characters Elmore was adroit. The literati called him the Dickens of Detroit. He wrote crime thrillers with immaculate prose and deadpan dialogue; it was the style he chose. His ten rules of writing are writers' Decalogue, he advises every author not to write a prologue. He had no time to waste for adjectives or adverbs and neither did he like the use of tricky verbs. Was he a literary genius? Many people think so; the news of his demise has come as a great blow. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Elmore Leonard
Mikeverdi on 23-08-2013
Elmore Leonard
I had no idea he had gone, 'The Dickens of Detroit' you have to love that! Nice tribute to a fine writer Luigi. Mike

Author's Reply:
Yes Mike, he had a good innings but has now gone. He will be remembered by his fine writing.

franciman on 23-08-2013
Elmore Leonard
Great tribute Luigi.
cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Thanks Jim, appreciated.

Luigi

amman on 24-08-2013
Elmore Leonard
Yeah, nicely created tribute indeed, Luigi. A fine and prolific writer. 'Decalogue', now there's another one for the lexicon.
Cheers.
Tony.

Author's Reply:
Hi Tony. I am always on the lookout for new words for the lexicon. I am currently reading a fascinating book on the origin of words and phrases, "The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll through the Hidden Connections of the English Language" by Mark Forsyth.

Cheers, Luigi.

Weefatfella on 24-08-2013
Elmore Leonard
 photo 915e0b75-fce7-4fc2-9921-556099197c13_zps1f6b3c50.jpg
I agree with eight of his rules.
Then again I never follow sat-nav directions.
I believe it's a disaster when an artist dies.
The well has dried,horrible thought.
Lovely tribute Luigi.
*******
I googled him.
He could be your twin.
Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
Cheers Paul. I am reluctant to follow any rules but his ten seem to make sense. As for being his twin, there might be a physical resemblance but I would have liked to have inherited his literary genius.
It is very sad to learn of his demise.
Thanks for the comment.

Luigi.

mageorge on 24-08-2013
Elmore Leonard
Nice one, Luigi.
Regards,
Mark.

Author's Reply:
Many thanks, Mark, for the comment and rating.

Best, Luigi.

Leila on 24-08-2013
Elmore Leonard
A luigi poem =

Author's Reply:

Leila on 24-08-2013
Elmore Leonard
oops sorry didn't finish...A Luigi comment = a smile...Leila

Author's Reply:

Leila on 24-08-2013
Elmore Leonard
ok honestly I am having a nightmare with trying to comment, sorry again!
What I meant to say was a Luigi poem = a smile...and no I haven't been drinking my PC laptop has a mind of its own at times...Leila

Author's Reply:
Eileen, I can sympathise: the PC is the bane of my life, to use an old clichè. I can't exercise any control over it.
But you have got there in the end and have come up with a kind comment, thank you.

Luigi x

Rab on 25-08-2013
Elmore Leonard
Nice tribute to one of the greats

Ross

Author's Reply:
Much obliged to you, Ross, for your comment. I see from your profile that you are a prose writer; I, on the other hand, write mostly poetry but shall endeavour to read some of your work.

Luigi


Genesis (posted on: 16-08-13)
A new arrival.

They've heard the news and seen the scan. A wee bundle of joy is going to be born. The parents are chuffed, so is the whole clan. The baby will be Aquarius, not Capricorn, as the month of February is the due date. It might be a boy but the gender's unknown yet, whatever it is, the outcome will be great. The grandparents to-be have used the phone to tell all and sundry of the forthcoming event. Their informed bulletin will last until birth and their keen enthusiasm will never relent. In their opinion it is the best thing on earth. I wonder if later they will change their tune when babysitting their favourite grandchild who won't go to sleep unless they croon. They will have to come up with a brainchild. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Genesis
deadpoet on 16-08-2013
Genesis
This made me smile. Thank you..

Author's Reply:
Thanks for your feedback, deadpoet.

Luigi:-)

Bozzz on 17-08-2013
Genesis
Luigi, if your writing is anything to go by, you are in good crooning voice too - but with a stage name like yours, it may be difficult to progress in the pop world. Afraid Lulu is bespoke, but Ionic might be good. Let us know when congrats are in order.... David

Author's Reply:
David, with a voice like mine it would be impossible to have success in the pop world even if my name was Lulu.
Once I recover from the initial shock of being a granddad to-be I'll keep you informed regarding the sprog's progress.
Cheers.

Leila on 17-08-2013
Genesis
Hitting the right note with this Luigi...

Author's Reply:
Thanks Eileen. I don't know about the right note, at the moment I am speechless.

Luigi x

Weefatfella on 17-08-2013
Genesis
 photo 915e0b75-fce7-4fc2-9921-556099197c13_zps1f6b3c50.jpg
Aye Luigi, It's all true, it gets even worse when you have to go to the police station to bail the wee bugger oot.
Thanks Luigi
Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
That bad, huh? Let's hope for a trouble-free future.

Thanks for the warning, Paul.

amman on 18-08-2013
Genesis
I think congrats are probably in order, Luigi. Better get the digital camera ready. Very informative and expertly rhymed, as ever.
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
Still a bit early for the camera, Tony but daughter keeps sending me scans of the sprog.
Thanks for the congrats.

Luigi:-)


Brief Romance (posted on: 09-08-13)
***

Love is not simple: I was enticed by her dimple but deterred by her wimple. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Brief Romance
mageorge on 09-08-2013
Brief Romance
Short and sweet, Luigi. Just how we like it!
A few words can say so much..
Regards,
Mark

Author's Reply:
Too true, Mark.

Best, Luigi.

Andrea on 09-08-2013
Brief Romance
Hahaha, lovely, Luigi πŸ™‚

A catholic piece πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
It was written on a wing and a prayer.

Cheers, Luigi x

PS Sorry for the late reply, I have been away for a few days.

amman on 10-08-2013
Brief Romance
Bit hard to wed a Nun, Luigi. Perhaps her wimple covered her pimple.
Cheers.
Tony.

Author's Reply:
Tony, she was nun the wiser about my intentions.

Bozzz on 11-08-2013
Brief Romance
Luigi, surely you have heard Forester's remark that you do not look at the mantelpiece when you poke the fire ...courage mon ami.... David

Author's Reply:
I am afraid ther was no spark in this particular fire. She wouldn't lose the habit.

Luigi πŸ™‚

Weefatfella on 28-08-2013
Brief Romance
 photo b75165e4-7600-48cb-b7fd-9f85d6470df7_zps4cd05353.jpg Ha Ha! I came across this on the random story. Brilliant Luigi, Had a wee giggle tae masell.
Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
I wrote it on a whim, Paul.
Cheers and thanks.


The Call (posted on: 05-08-13)
Scientists have found further evidence that dolphins call each other by "name". Research has revealed that the marine mammals use a unique whistle to identify each other.

There's one thing I want to make clear: don't call me pet, or love, or dear. If you want me just whistle, that's all. Follow the advice of Lauren Bacall: Just put your lips together and blow. If you are a friend I will let you know I've heard your call and I'll respond with the same sound to form a bond. Identification is the name of the game and so we call each other ''by name''. I won't recognise you by your physique but by your signal which is unique. It's a sensible way to keep in touch and the effort required isn't too much. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for The Call
Mikeverdi on 05-08-2013
The Call
Love it! 'just put your lips together and blow' never thought I would read that line in a context like this; that's my morning chuckle taken care of. Mike

Author's Reply:
Hi Mike. Glad to hear you loved it. About that line, it just goes to show we can get inspiration from anything - a phrase overheard or a quotation remembered.
Cheers.

deadpoet on 05-08-2013
The Call
Lovely- beautiful Dolphins-especially loved the line about not noticing appearances- such intelligence. DP

Author's Reply:
They are indeed highly intelligent, deadpoet. Thanks for reading and commenting.

franciman on 05-08-2013
The Call
Luigi, there is so much pure craft in this piece. Looks often do deceive; true both in the subject and in your poetry. Loved this.
cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Jim, much encouraged by your kind words. Many thanks.

amman on 05-08-2013
The Call
Very droll, Luigi.

Author's Reply:
I knew you'd like it, Tony.
Cheers.

teifii on 05-08-2013
The Call
Really well crafted bit of dolphin speak. Wouldn't be surprised if they did write poems as well.

Author's Reply:
I am sure they do, Daffni. I wish we could hear their poetry; we could be inspired by it.

Luigi x

Andrea on 05-08-2013
The Call
Brilliant, Luigi! And congrats on the nib, well deserved (and no, it wasn't moi :))

Author's Reply:
I won't hold it against you, Andrea. I will instead thank the anonymous benefactor.
Pleased that you liked the poem. Thanks.

Luigi x

Weefatfella on 05-08-2013
The Call
 photo 915e0b75-fce7-4fc2-9921-556099197c13_zps1f6b3c50.jpg
Aye ,Luigi.
In the steelworks one of the foreman had the habit of whistling to attract the attention of the worker he wished to delegate work to.

A good idea on reflection.

Because of the really loud noise in the place.
Problem was, the men didn't like the thought of answering to his whistles.
One guy after constantly ignoring the gaffer, got so angry he marched up to the Bugger and said,

" Is your name Andrew Glen? "


 photo black_zpsecdf79a0.jpgBlack Bob is from the comic book 'THE DANDY'


The foreman answered, "Naw. Why?"

He replied.
" Cause mine isnae Black Boab, and I'm no a dug. so stoap yir whistling, unless yie want me tae bite yie."
He stopped it. A really enjoyable and thoughtful piece. I found this for yie.



Author's Reply:
Thanks for the witty comment, Paul, and for the youtube video. Brought back many memories. I bet not many youngsters know who Lauren Bacall was.

Luigi πŸ™‚

mageorge on 05-08-2013
The Call
Another work of art from the 'school Luigi'
Looking forward to catching up on reading your recent works.
Regards,
Mark


Author's Reply:
Mark, I am flattered by your remarks and would like it very much if you were to read some of my other work.
Thanks for your interest.

Bozzz on 05-08-2013
The Call
Delightful, Luigi. The deft touch as usual is justly rewarded. Rhyming very well integrated with the text. I did stumble a bit on the Identification line - could the rhythm run better without the 'is" with a comma or dash to replace it ?.....Congrats, David


Author's Reply:
David, I always appreciate your constructive criticism and have noted the latest comment. I will certainly give the piece a further look.

Luigi.

Corin on 05-08-2013
The Call
Great Stuff Luigi - hoping to hear you reads this at UKALive see https://ukauthors.com/phorum5/read.php?94,219923

Dave

Author's Reply:
Many thanks for your appreciation, David. I'll be in Italy on that date but I am sure there will be plenty of attendees to brighten the gathering.
All the best, Luigi.

Pronto on 06-08-2013
The Call
Great poem Luigi on diving trips I've been really close to these magnificent creatures they are truly awesome in their intelligence.

Author's Reply:
Hello Pronto. I have heard that dolphins are very sociable creatures. It must have been exhilarating to mix in their company.

ChairmanWow on 06-08-2013
The Call
Luigi,
no doubt about it dolphins are highly intelligent. Certain fishing communities need to give them a break...As for your poem, nice work all around especially like the sassy L.B. quote.

Ralph

Author's Reply:
Ralph, nice to hear from you. I agree that dolphins are exceptional creatures and we ought to show them due consideration.
Lauren Bacall was a brilliant actress and that quote has become a classic.
Thanks for reading and commenting.

cooky on 06-08-2013
The Call
Lovely write which makes us all equal despite the human condition of arrogance which we have towards our fellow creatures.

Author's Reply:
You are so right, cooky. It is indeed arrogant of man to claim superiority over the rest of the animal world especially in the light of the dolphins' intelligent behaviour. A touch of humility would not go amiss.
Many thanks for your incisive remark.

Kazzmoss on 07-08-2013
The Call
Loved this, it is a really fun read and clever too. I posted it on my facebook page if that's okay.

https://www.ukauthors.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=31008

Author's Reply:
Hi Karen. Our friendship on Facebook has just been confirmed. Nice to hear from you. I am glad that you like this poem and want to reproduce it on your Facebook page. Please go ahead, I am delighted.

Luigi x

Kazzmoss on 07-08-2013
The Call
Thanks Luigi πŸ™‚


Author's Reply:

Nemo on 08-08-2013
The Call
A well deserved Nib! This is so elegantly and skillfully written. I love the originality of the subject matter. Gerald

Author's Reply:
So glad you liked this, Gerald. Thank you for letting me know.

Best, Luigi.

discopants on 09-08-2013
The Call
Skilfully written- even though you told us it was about dolphins, it invites paralells to our own relationships/ ways of recognising each other...

Author's Reply:
Hello Keith. We don't hear from you very often. How are you?
What you say in your comment is absolutely true, there is indeed a parallel. Sound plays a vital part in communication not just for dolphins but for humans as well.
Thanks for keeping in touch.


The Prodigal Son (posted on: 26-07-13)
A revised version of my entry to this week's Forum challenge - Absence.

He had been away for so long that people thought he was dead but they were completely wrong. He emigrated because the vicar had denounced him from the pulpit for addiction to the hard liquor. He had decided to return home and when asked the reason why he no longer wished to roam he didn't have long to ponder; he just answered, 'Absinthe makes the heart grow fonder.' © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for The Prodigal Son
Bozzz on 26-07-2013
The Prodigal Son
Up to your usual trickery Luigi. The vicar should at least have admired the man's choice of suicidal liquor.... David

Author's Reply:
No peace for the wicked, David. Thou shall not...and all that.
Cheers.

Andrea on 26-07-2013
The Prodigal Son
Haha, you played on 'absinthe' too πŸ™‚ Mine got disqualified for being too long πŸ™

Nice one, Luigi πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Purely coincidental, Andrea. My piece was also too long and had to pare it down. To be honest I can't understand why the limit was reduced from forty to twelve lines. Your entry was excellent and would have been my choice.
Thanks for reading my effort and commenting.

Luigi x

Andrea on 26-07-2013
The Prodigal Son
Well, it's up to the challenger to set the rules now. Never mind, I'll post on main site πŸ™‚



Author's Reply:

Weefatfella on 27-07-2013
The Prodigal Son
 photo 915e0b75-fce7-4fc2-9921-556099197c13_zps1f6b3c50.jpg
Ha Ha!
Oh, Sneaky Luigi.
I actually laughed out loud at this.
Brilliant.
Weefatfella.


Author's Reply:
Thanks Paul. With the prompt being ABSENCE, the punchline was there for the taking.

Luigi:-)


Our Hero (posted on: 22-07-13)
Our Hero. That's how shot Pakistan schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai, who addressed the UN, was described.

We heard with shock that a girl had been shot and we asked ourselves: was it part of a plot? What was behind it, what was the reason? She must have committed the sin of high treason. The attackers were guilty of discrimination; her only demand was the right to education. She survived the ordeal by luck and will power; her enemies could do nothing but rage and glower. She showed to the world that a girl - a fifteen year old - could defy prejudice by being brave and bold. The efforts to silence her were bound to fail given her resistance to the fanatics' blackmail. She addressed the UN and she said books and pen scare those extremists, misogynist men. © Luigi Pagano 2013 First published on Poetry24
Archived comments for Our Hero
Pronto on 22-07-2013
Our Hero
Excellent Luigi I loved this so apt poem.

Author's Reply:
Thanks, Pronto, greatly appreciated.

cooky on 22-07-2013
Our Hero
Very well written. The pen has more power than the sword.

Author's Reply:
This adage is true today as it was in the times of Edward Bulmer-Lytton who used it in his play Richelieu.
Thanks for reading and commenting.

Savvi on 22-07-2013
Our Hero
Very powerful and befitting of the topic, well penned. S

Author's Reply:
Cheers Savvi. The brave actions of this courageous girl have caused a great sensation around the world and this poem is in recognition of the mature behaviour of a fifteen year-old girl.
I am much obliged for your kind words. Thanks.

Weefatfella on 23-07-2013
Our Hero
 photo 915e0b75-fce7-4fc2-9921-556099197c13_zps1f6b3c50.jpg
Brilliant as usual Luigi.
The pen is indeed mightier.
Thank you for this Luigi.
Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
My thanks go to you, Paul, for reading and commenting.

Luigi πŸ™‚


An Obsession (posted on: 19-07-13)
***

I am nuts about Hazel, a girl with chestnut hair and brown almond eyes. I follow her everywhere. I'd shadow her to Brazil on an Airbus or a Boeing or to the Wall of China if that's where she's going. I know most of her secrets: she is fond of nougat though she doesn't eat it when she is in a car. She likes to read a book before hitting the sack. I'd like to get to know her but she's hard to crack. Perhaps she is too shy - one can never tell - I should encourage her to come out of her shell. Or maybe I should stop this nonsensical stalking, introduce myself properly and do some serious talking. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for An Obsession
Texasgreg on 19-07-2013
An Obsession
Lol, Luigi!

Sounds like a good sitcom in the making...

Greg πŸ™‚

 photo Gunspincowboy.gif

Author's Reply:
Hi Greg. So you have discovered my deliberate ploy? I knew you would.

Cheers, Luigi πŸ™‚

Andrea on 19-07-2013
An Obsession
Clever, Luigi!

Author's Reply:
Ta muchly, Andrea.

Luigi xxx

Mikeverdi on 19-07-2013
An Obsession
Always entertaining, Nice one Luigi. Mike

Author's Reply:
Many thanks Mike. I always try to entertain.

Luigi.

Bozzz on 21-07-2013
An Obsession
Oh Luigi, in forgiving the first line (Hazel nuts -the apex of hard corn !), it has the ring of pursuit in which you delight. Nougat in a car is a new twist - how can you possibly adore a girl that does that?
I wish you well in the chase, but please don't overdo it - we value your company...David

Author's Reply:
But that is the kernel of the piece, David. Don't worry, there is nothing sinister in my pursuit. If she doesn't fancy me, I'll drop out of the chase.

Pronto on 22-07-2013
An Obsession
Well I wish you well in your persuit but maybe she'll cashew first! Oh I am sorry! πŸ˜‰
Good witty penning of a good giggle.

Author's Reply:
Thanks for the warning, Pronto. I will make it clear to her that I am not prepared to shell out any money.
Cheers.


Saturday Night Fever (posted on: 12-07-13)
My entry for the 'Saturday Night Special' Forum challenge.

Here is the winner of our disco event made glorious by this son of York. He gave us pleasure and enjoyment with his gyrations and fancy footwork. Now his brow's adorned with a wreath and his hand holds a silver cup aloft. He has a hard demeanour but, beneath his manly appearance, he is rather soft. But he's not the type to be put down. Having won this prestigious prize, he has become the talk of the town and people admire him and eulogize. He has made a great impact on the girls who have seen him perform on the floor. His athletic pirouettes and crazy whirls will get him through their bedroom door. He is the ideal hunk for many a lass who hankers after him and would be glad to lose her virtue in a night stand. Alas, he is in a civil partnership with a lad. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Saturday Night Fever
Pronto on 12-07-2013
Saturday Night Fever
I love this mate from the parodied Shakespearian opener to the final twist at the end. John Revolter, Saturday Night Deceiver mayhap?
Great effort mate gotta be a nine.


Author's Reply:
Thanks for your appreciation, Pronto.

Andrea on 12-07-2013
Saturday Night Fever
Hahah, loved that last line πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
I thought you might, Andrea.

Cheers, Luigi x

Mikeverdi on 12-07-2013
Saturday Night Fever
Agree with the others, its a 9 from me... brilliant! Mike

Author's Reply:
Glad you liked it, Mike. Thanks.

Weefatfella on 13-07-2013
Saturday Night Fever
 photo 5031cf9b-61d2-4fbf-912f-998c505fb4bc_zpsd7cccd97.jpg
Aye, he fooled everybody Luigi.
Musta been the fever.
Weefatfella.


Author's Reply:
He raised the temperature alright, Paul, but the girls got cold comfort.
Thanks for reading and commenting.

Luigi:-)


Final Curtain (posted on: 08-07-13)
BBC News headline 2/7/2013: "Microbes to be 'last survivors' on future Earth"

''And now, the end is here And so I face the final curtain…'' How prophetic with this melody the crooner Frank Sinatra sounds. It looks as if in a billion years the heat from the Sun will be so intense, that the oceans start to evaporate and no human beings will be around. The microbes will last a bit longer, give or take a billion years or two, then they too will eventually vanish and the Earth will be devoid of life. That the extremophiles are stronger and more resilient than even Superman is a cause for concern to us mortals always trying to overcome our strife. Against the Sun's rays there's no shield and I can't see what defence we can build if the flaming star becomes much hotter. We'd be left with our backs to the wall. I wouldn't call it a level-playing field when tiny organisms have the advantage and will outlive the rest by a long chalk. It'd be fairer if the curtain fell for us all. © Luigi Pagano 2013 First published on Poetry24
Archived comments for Final Curtain
Savvi on 08-07-2013
Final Curtain
Those damn microbes you can't take them anywhere, well...
not unless the other trillion come with you.:) made me think thanks, as ever. S

Author's Reply:
Hi Savvi. A trillion you say? Don't worry, they'll be frying - if not tonight - in a couple of billion years.
Cheers.

Pronto on 09-07-2013
Final Curtain
Ah well when the sun turns into a red giant there'll be nowt left anyway fortunately we won't be around to see it!
Good thought provoknig write dear poet well done.

Author's Reply:
You shattered my hopes, Pronto. I was hoping to stay alive until then. Oh, well...
Thanks for reading and commenting.

cooky on 09-07-2013
Final Curtain
I like this. Who will cry for the human race. I suspect even the universe will be glad to see the back of us.

Author's Reply:
Too true, cooky. No one will shed any tears for the human race which is doing its utmost to destroy itself.
Thanks for looking in.

Luigi.

ValDohren on 10-07-2013
Final Curtain
Not much fun being a microbe though !

Author's Reply:
True, Val, but it looks as if they are going to have the last laugh.

Luigi x

Bozzz on 11-07-2013
Final Curtain
In the beginning there was sun and hydrogen and oxygen and we were the penultimate quirks of fate from this mix. I think we are of a mind, but sadly in this case money speaks louder to our brains than intelligence and will be the decider of our fate on earth. You bring more variety in your poem than I did - don't know how I managed to miss you, Luigi. Bon voyage...David

Author's Reply:
What a coincidence, David, that we both tackled the topic of the eventual destruction of our planet.
Thanks for looking in and commenting.


Barren (posted on: 05-07-13)
***

Standing by the school door she thinks about her woes trying to be philosophical: 'It's life. That's how it goes.' But it's no use pretending and say it doesn't matter as she hears the laughter and the children's' chatter echoing in the playground. Take care of them she must as if they were her own, show them love and trust. On learning she was barren all her hopes had died. Realising she'd be childless, had broken down and cried. Then she became a teacher and the pain was less acute; although she's not a mother she is an able substitute. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Barren
Weefatfella on 05-07-2013
Barren
 photo 5031cf9b-61d2-4fbf-912f-998c505fb4bc_zpsd7cccd97.jpg
Absolutely Luigi. You give a warm feeling when describing the altruistic teacher.
Then we are dashed along with her, when learning she is barren.
I was moved by this brilliant strategy Luigi.
Not often that happens tae me.
Thank you pal.
Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
Thank you Paul for your generous appreciation.

Cheers, Luigi.

deadpoet on 05-07-2013
Barren
Very well phrased Luigi- I like it and I like the rhyming- a sad fate for some- hard to imagine for others who have children. I have two sisters who are childless, yet they are so good at looking after others children. dp

Author's Reply:
Hi dp. Even though affected by misfortune, a woman won't lose her maternal instinct and, as you rightly point out, she can give loving care and affection to other children.
Many thanks for reading and commenting.

Luigi.

Texasgreg on 07-07-2013
Barren
Aye! Missed yer whimsical wisdom...

Good stuff, Luigi...

Greg πŸ™‚

 photo Gunspincowboy.gif

Author's Reply:
Hi Greg, long time no hear. I too have missed your witty comments. Thanks for your kind comments.

Luigi πŸ™‚

Bozzz on 07-07-2013
Barren
Creative reward in teaching is fine, but a sad substitute for the real thing - or even for adoption. Wisdom well expressed Luigi - I have missed you too....David

Author's Reply:
David, much obliged to you for such an incisive comment.

Luigi.


The Offer (posted on: 01-07-13)
James Gandolfini dies aged 51.

''Make him an offer that he can't refuse'' is a phrase from 'The Godfather' films that's become a cinematographic clichι. For the actor James Gandolfini it meant the opportunity of a lifetime when given the lead role in 'The Sopranos' TV play. It was a novel way to portray a mobster: the Mafia capo risen through the ranks who goes on to be the leader of the pack. The character was full of contradictions: a devoted father, a cold-blooded killer, a tough guy but prone to anxiety attacks. This prompts him to go into therapy and he unburdens his soul to Dr. Melfi revealing a situation that is intricate. The female psychiatrist helps Soprano with sessions full of sexual tensions but she's too professional to be profligate. The pilot of the series was so successful that episodes after episodes ensued and in each James Gandolfini shone. There won't be, alas, any more shows with this brilliant actor, a true genius, who has sadly, and prematurely, gone. © Luigi Pagano 2013 First published on Poetry24 - 28/6/2013
Archived comments for The Offer
Andrea on 01-07-2013
The Offer
Wonderful, Luigi! The Sopranos was the best series I've ever seen.

Great, underrated actor, who died far too young.

Author's Reply:
Thanks for reading this, Andrea. 'The Sopranos' was a classy series and James Gandolfini was a fine actor.
Such a shame that he should die so soon.

Luigi x

Savvi on 02-07-2013
The Offer
Oh πŸ™ I didn't know he had died, this is a considered tribute Luigi in your usual high quality style, thanks for posting

Author's Reply:
Hi Savvi. Sorry for the late reply, I've been watching tennis at Wimbledon and neglected my duties.
It hasn't been long since his demise and although his obituary appeared in the media, this news - if not forgotten - has been overtaken by other events in Egypt and the Middle East.
Thanks for reading and commenting.


Doctor, Doctor (posted on: 14-06-13)
Doctor Who: element of sexuality attracts criticism. First published on Poetry24

My goodness, gracious me, it cannot possibly be: the Doctor's new shipmate was actually seen to osculate the Time Lord in the Tardis. But was it an innocent kiss? In the light of that episode I feel spurred to write an ode to record the mixed reactions, with some advocating sanctions whilst others, giving approval, speak of the series' renewal. Purists are known to profess they're sure the Doctor is sexless and a notion that they try to flog is that he doesn't need to snog. As for me, I am not at all wise where progress eventually lies. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Doctor, Doctor
amman on 14-06-2013
Doctor, Doctor
Didn't see this episode, Luigi. Let the poor bugger snog in peace. He's been around long enough to deserve some home comforts.
Cheers.
Tony.

Author's Reply:
Hi Tony, didn't get notification of your comment and it was a nice surprise when I saw it.
I am of the same opinion that they ought to let him have a bit of slap and tickle but I am afraid that the next move will be to fit him (or her, if the rumours are right) with a chastity belt. It is a hard life being a time lord.
Cheers, Luigi.


The Sinking of the Mary Rose (posted on: 14-06-13)
My entry to this week's Forum challenge.

When looking at incidents that are nautical we can find one which was absolutely critical and that was the sinking of the Mary Rose. Nobody can explain how the disaster arose although various scenarios were suggested; one being that the ship was too congested either with sailors and soldiers or guns - culverins and cannons weighing many tons. The ship was a large galleon, or carrack, about to lead the English Fleet into attack. She had been loaded with extra weapons and that was what caused, experts reckon, the ship to heel to starboard and then sink with water filtering through every chink. And to think the vessel had been fortified! Witnessing the loss, King Hal was mortified. Did he mourn the demise of nigh 400 men and berated himself for the lack of acumen? Because insight was undoubtedly absent when the navy's pride was lost in the Solent. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for The Sinking of the Mary Rose
Andrea on 14-06-2013
The Sinking of the Mary Rose
Another poetic history lesson, Luigi - lovely!

Author's Reply:
Hi Andrea, I am back from a mini break and pleased to be welcomed by a friendly voice. Thanks.

Luigi xxx

Weefatfella on 15-06-2013
The Sinking of the Mary Rose
 photo fd68aa69-bd2a-4057-8056-d78ca32405b1_zps7a968777.jpg
Aye, Too many Cannons, be they farcical or clerical.
Cheers Luigi.
Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
Aye Paul, as you rightly point out any excess leads to downfalls.
Cheers.


The Best Chicken Broth in the World (posted on: 27-05-13)
My entry to last week's Forum Prose/Poetry challenge. Edited.

You don't have to be Jewish or wait for next Passover to savour a succulent dish that will bowl you over. I talk of the recipe that's known as chicken broth. Help the cook but don't be lippy and incur your hostess's wrath. Take a kosher fowl and boil it after washing off the salt and the soup will be a hit. Skim and save the chicken schmaltz to make moist matzo balls. All vegetables you require I cannot now recall but they'll be easy to enquire. I remember onions and carrots, rutabaga, parsley and turnips. I'm reciting all this like a parrot but I hope I have given good tips. I am not one given to hyperbole but I'd say that this type of soup, cooked in a manner masterly, can completely revive any group. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for The Best Chicken Broth in the World
amman on 28-05-2013
The Best Chicken Broth in the World
You do have a way with rhymes, Luigi and the recipe sounds rather scrumptious. Not sure about the 'after washing it of the salt' line. What are matzo balls?; not in my culinary lexicon.
Cheers.
Tony.

Author's Reply:
Hi Tony. Sorry for not answering earlier, I have problems with my e-mail. I'll explain that line about washing the salt: the recipe I looked up is a Jewish one and apparently the chicken is saturated with salt which is then washed off prior to cooking. Matzo balls, also known as kneydls, are dumplings for the chicken soup.
We live and learn.
Thanks for the comment.
Luigi.

Andrea on 28-05-2013
The Best Chicken Broth in the World
Ah, chicken broth! That and a nice, strong cuppa cure all ills πŸ™‚ Nice one Luigi (and don't forget your anthology votes!)

Author's Reply:
Could do with some myself, I have been feeling a bit fragile of late. I'll get round to voting one of these days but I think I'll drop out of the nomination: I have been included in quite a few UKA's anthologies and it's only fair to give the newbies a chance to represented.
Thanks for dropping by.

Luigi x

ValDohren on 28-05-2013
The Best Chicken Broth in the World
Sounds delicious Luigi - very cleverly written.

Val

Author's Reply:
I have tasted it and it is delicious. Thanks Val.

amman on 30-05-2013
The Best Chicken Broth in the World
Me again, Luigi. Thanks for culinary education re. matzo balls. The other nit-picking thingee I mentioned; shouldn't it be something like 'after washing off the salt' rather than 'washing it of the salt'?

Cheers.

Tony.

Author's Reply:
Tony, you nit-picker, off course you are right: it is much better grammar. I shall see to it forthwith.
Thanks.

Lindylou on 30-05-2013
The Best Chicken Broth in the World
This definitely tickled the taste buds Luigi.

Linda

Author's Reply:
Thanks for reading and commenting on this fun piece written for our (lighthearted) weekly challenge in the Forum. The prize to the winner is a virtual Golden Egg.

Best, Luigi.


Taxing Time (posted on: 20-05-13)
Seasonal returns.

''It's time to complete your tax return'', my wife reminded me this afternoon, ''I finished mine and now it's your turn; but don't leave it too late, do it soon.'' I tell you that she's a cuckoo in the nest, she's employed by the Inland Revenue * and will not give me a moment's rest if I don't give the Treasury what's due. I try telling her that I follow the example of companies like Amazon and Starbucks, that the scope for tax avoidance is ample, but with this argument she has no truck. She doesn't understand my grievances when I say that regulations are unfair: while we can claim married allowances a mistress is one thing we can't declare. The money that one lavishes on one's lover goes a long way to stimulate the economy but such sums are impossible to recover. Yet we always accept this with bonhomie. The system is in urgent need of reform, we cannot let the taxman bleed us dry, to pay more and more is now the norm and we are not permitted to ask why. © Luigi Pagano 2013 * Now renamed H.M. Revenue & Customs
Archived comments for Taxing Time
Savvi on 20-05-2013
Taxing Time
Economy and Bonhomie now there's a rhyming couplet you don't often see and wonderful tale as ever Luigi very well done hope you didn't miss the deadline. πŸ™‚ S

Author's Reply:
Sorry for not replying earlier, Savvi, but I didn't receive a notification and it is only now that I have taken look at the site that I see the comment. At the moment I am a bit under the weather and not taking part in much commenting.
Thank very much.

Bozzz on 22-05-2013
Taxing Time
Hi Luigi, I am sure your survival instincts are in good order and wish you well. Here we have an enjoyable dance with destiny - let us know if you find legal way to claim expenses for support of a mistress - or two....David

Author's Reply:
Thanks, David, for your wishes. I'd like to say that I'm fighting fit but even though not 100% I'm fighting.
One would have to terribly lucky, or crooked, to be able to beat the taxman.
Why, even the U.S. tax authorities got in the act and managed to grab from me a handful of dollars as I had the misfortune to sell a few e-books through Smashwords.com which is an American set up.
Given the vast amount they are not recovering from big corporation, how are the few coppers they have exacted from me help their economy? It beggars belief.

Weefatfella on 22-05-2013
Taxing Time
 photo c8985de3-44fa-4972-8452-209c5b038bed_zps41f8f0a0.jpg
Hi, luigi. I wish you a speedy recovery.
I too am caught up in tax at the moment.
The HMRC, have intimated they want to examine my accounts.
I am up to my neck in it at the moment.
Still, I may just wear a hemp scarf and deny them everything.
Would that be a suspended sentence?
Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
Hello Paul. Don't be so sure: you can only get a suspended sentence if you commit murder; if you are deemed to have fiddled the books you'll be shot at dawn.
And to think that income tax was introduced as a temporary measure to finance one war or another.
I am afraid we'll never see the end of it given that conflicts are proliferating all over the world and no doubt the governmement will want to tax us to the hilt to safeguard the safety of the realm. But perhaps I'm a bit too cynical. Here is to better days.
Cheers.


Behind the Faηade (posted on: 17-05-13)
Cleveland rescue: The mystery of 2207 Seymour Avenue. First published on Poetry24.

We often speak of aliens abductions, of people vanishing without a trace and assume that creatures from Mars have spirited them to an outer space. There are stories and films galore such as Cocoon and The Fourth Kind, where the inhabitants of other worlds have come to earth with evil in mind. But let us forget the extraterrestrials and concentrate on another scenario the one enacted by one wicked man, one calculating and sordid Lothario. It was behind the respectable faηade of one dwelling in Seymour Avenue where he committed a terrible crime, one so abject that he's now going to rue. For a decade three young women captive lived segregated from their loved ones. They were negated the right to freedom and the happiness they cherished once. For the young ladies the nightmare is over now that the villain has been unmasked but to understand this strange situation pertinent questions will have to be asked. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Behind the Faηade
amman on 19-05-2013
Behind the Façade
A sordid tale of depravity indeed, Luigi. I'm sure the Martians would treat their abductees better. Expertly penned as ever.
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
Tony, thank you. Gracious as ever.

Best, Luigi.


Chained Melody (posted on: 10-05-13)
My entry to this week's Forum Prose/Poetry Challenge.

Were Odysseus' mariners committing high treason when they tied him to the mast? No, they did it for a reason. They were ordered to do it, so they weren't in the wrong. Their captain said he wanted to hear the Siren's song. But he had to be restrained, there was no other choice: the temptress was endowed with the most alluring voice. Her melodious performance could prove to be quite deadly and sailors were advised not to listen to her medley. With beeswax in their ears the seamen were in control while our hero, handicapped, did at least achieve his goal. They had been in grave peril when the creature was near but once out of her reach they no longer had any fear. They had avoided a disaster and were now on cloud nine their master gave his verdict: her singing had been divine. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Chained Melody
orangedream on 10-05-2013
Chained Melody
Great stuff, again, Luigi. A story, succinctly told, in seven stanzas. Takes quite some doing, but you pulled it off, as ever, admirably.

Tina;-)xxx

Author's Reply:
Yep, that's me, a man of few words, Tina. Perhaps not as minimalist as some who seem to manage with three or four lines (some of which I find baffling, to be honest). But everyone has his/her own style and in the end it all hinges on whether that style appeals or not. I am happy to have received the thumbs up on this and thank you very much.

Luigi xxx

Jolen on 10-05-2013
Chained Melody
Gods, I've missed your work, Luigi. Good to see you've not lost the touch. Well done.

love,
jolen

Author's Reply:
Hello stranger. What a lovely surprise to hear from you. How is life treating you? Let me have some news.
I have recently published (well self-published) a collection of my poems entitled "Poetry On Tap" with Lulu.com - available at Amazon Co.UK. I have a spare copy which I could let you have and in return you may like to write a short review on that site. Is your address still the same? Keep in touch.

Love, Luigi.

Savvi on 10-05-2013
Chained Melody
Your story telling always makes me doth my cap and this is no exception well crafted and a delight to read. S

Author's Reply:
It's nice to see that sometimes one's work strikes a chord with the readers; it's good for morale and boosts confidence. Many thanks Savvi.

Jolen on 10-05-2013
Chained Melody
Hey Luigi,

I'm good, thanks. I've been busy trying to do all the wrong things for a few years. lol I would be honored to read your collection and write a review for you. Send it on over, darlin'. Yes, addy is still the same.

love,
j

Author's Reply:

ValDohren on 10-05-2013
Chained Melody
Story succinctly told and very well penned.

Val

Author's Reply:
Mille grazie, Val, as we say in Italian. A thousand thanks.


Charity, Sweet Charity - A Postscript (posted on: 06-05-13)
Reading Ammans' poem 'Charity, Sweet Charity' evoked pleasant memories.

I read what Tony wrote on hope, faith and charity. His account was hilarious and expressed with clarity. I too, young and virile, with energy to burn, like other adolescents had to wait my turn. I always fell in love, but it may have been lust. With unsuccessful chases I thought that I would bust. Then something happened one beautiful spring day: after patiently waiting a chance came my way. I was renting a room in Kensington High Street; the girl next door and I were destined to meet. She'd reached adulthood but virgo intacta still. Her father, a doctor, had put her on the pill. She revealed her secret without any reticence and that awoke in me a feeling of concupiscence. We agreed to do the business without any regret and I still recall with pleasure the moment that we met. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Charity, Sweet Charity - A Postscript
amman on 06-05-2013
Charity, Sweet Charity - A Postscript
Wow, I must be famous; inspiring and being mentioned in a poem. I think I'll retire and write my autobiography - should take all of 10 minutes!

Seriously, Luigi, this is well written, flows well and will evoke memories for many of us, when we were filled with concupiscence. Those were the days of our youth. SIGH.

Cheers.

Tony.

Author's Reply:
Many thanks Tony for giving me the inspiration to write this. I thought your poem was a hoot but it had a lot of truth in it. Many young men, and a few older ones, have gone through the experience you describe.
Best, Luigi.

Bozzz on 08-05-2013
Charity, Sweet Charity - A Postscript
Luigi, I am sure you deserved your 'desert island' (girl next door) luck - and now a witty poem to entertain us - you have it all young man. ...David

Author's Reply:
Thanks for your appreciation, David. I am not quite sure about the 'young man' bit but I'm flattered.
Cheers, Luigi.


Legend (posted on: 03-05-13)
Woodstock icon Richie Havens dies. (First published on Poetry24)

The singer/guitarist 'Richie' Havens was the opening artiste at Woodstock. Performing from 5 o'clock till seven he launched the famed Festival of rock which was to acquire legendary status. It was billed as an Aquarian exposition, a stirring and inspired musical afflatus that generated excellent compositions. It was to enhance Richard's reputation, a major turning point in his career. Applauded by the crowd on location, his many encores drew the biggest cheer. Who can forget his ''Motherless Child''? Hearing the words of this haunting song the concert-goers went completely wild and the emotion that they felt was strong. Alas, this musical colossus is no more but his name is consigned to posterity; we won't be able to listen to his encores and that for genuine fans is a calamity. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Legend
littleditty on 03-05-2013
Legend
loved this Luigi - I am going to youtube for a listen - it#s been ages! Hope you're well xx

Author's Reply:
Hello Nicky. So glad that this poem of mine has prompted you to look up a video of the great man, whose music will be sadly missed.
I see your name from time to time on twitter or Facebook and also read some of your poems on ABC but haven't seen you on this site for long time. I am well and hope the same goes for you.

Luigi x

amman on 04-05-2013
Legend
Very informative, Luigi and a stirring epitaph for a great musician. Thanks for 'afflatus'; another word into the lexicon.
Are you sure you weren't born in Blighty? Your English language skills are exceptional.
Cheers.


Author's Reply:
Hi Tony. Thanks for reading and commenting. As for my place of birth, my passport definitely says Italy but I have spent more years in England than in my own country. Collecting new words is a hobby of mine; whenever I come across an interesting one I'll squirrel it for a suitable day.
Cheers.

Andrea on 04-05-2013
Legend
Blimey, I didn't know he'd died! Great tribute pome, Luigi. Here's a vid for you πŸ™‚



Author's Reply:
Thanks for the video, Andrea, much enjoyed. You usually keep up with headlines but the news of Richie's demise must have eluded you. He died at the age of 72 of a heart attack at his home in Jersey City. He'll be sadly missed.

Luigi x

ValDohren on 04-05-2013
Legend
Very well written and rhymed Luigi - deserving of the nib.

Val

Author's Reply:
Thank you Val. I felt that a poetic obituary was an appropriate tribute to his talent.


A Bolt from the Blue (posted on: 29-04-13)
The changing of the gods. (First published on Poetry24).

One can imagine Aphrodite's disquiet when she arose from the sea in Paphos and saw the Cypriots running riot. She thought, at first, that her siblings, The Erinyes, had wreaked havoc to punish the people for their failings or that, Zeus, in Olympus, being cross, had discharged a thunderbolt on the isle to show the islanders who was boss. She soon realised that her supreme god had been superseded by other deities, such as Odin and Thor, and that was odd. As the new regime advocates pragmatism a meeting was arranged to sort the crisis; yet some proposals could stifle dynamism. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for A Bolt from the Blue
amman on 29-04-2013
A Bolt from the Blue
Nice bit of social and topical satire, Luigi. Expertly rhymed, as ever. I wuz going to say that it was all Greek to me but I wouldn't be so crass. Thanks for the lesson in mythology.
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
Sorry for the tardy reply, Tony. I was glued to the box watching snooker.
I must admit that the whole Eurozone financial crisis is inexplicable and I can safely say that it is all Greek to me. Your comments are always appreciated even if acknowledged late. Thanks.


Daft (posted on: 19-04-13)
My entry to this week's Forum Prose/Poetry challenge. The word (you guessed it) was DAFT.

To write serious poetry was hard graft. I could not emulate any of the greats so I decided to think of something daft. I sat with pen poised and a blank page and convinced myself that it was easy but my brain this time did not engage. I wrote reams and reams of the stuff and though none of it made any sense it wasn't in my opinion daft enough. I read some poems by Spike Milligan and copied his hilarious devious logic but it looked to me like shenanigan: if I wanted to achieve some success it would have to be my own creation with just the right amount of silliness. It was an obsession, a bee in my bonnet, but as I could not produce the goods I reverted to compose the usual sonnet. © Luigi Pagano 2013 My Book
Archived comments for Daft
ValDohren on 20-04-2013
Daft
Which sonnet would that be then Luigi, I shall look forward to reading it. As for daft, well guess we all go there sometimes - a little bit of daft is welcome these days with so much misery in the world. Good one.
Val πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Saying that I composed it doesn't necessarily mean that I would publish it, Val. Knowing what my sonnets are like, that would be a daft thing to do. I think I'll leave that form to the experts.
Cheers, Luigi πŸ™‚

Savvi on 21-04-2013
Daft
I thought this was very funny and bounced along nicely, a deserving winner. πŸ™‚ S

Author's Reply:
Thanks, Savvi, appreciated.


Ruby (posted on: 15-04-13)
One may ask: Who is Sylvia? But there is no need to ask who Silvio is. (Also published on Poetry24 - 9/4/2013)

It is the most powerful gem in the universe; placed under a pillow it wards off nightmares. This fact has been celebrated in many a verse: as a stone that is filled with love and passion it brings much luck to one who owns a ruby. He is bound to have contentment and peace. It may be true for some but for one booby it's meant a lot of aggravation and chagrin. Most rubies come from Burma or Thailand yet the one that he got was from Morocco. Foolishly, he buried his head in the sand and ignored the rumours doing the rounds. A symbol of friendship, if given as a gift, but it was said he bought it with hard cash for lust - not love - if you catch my drift. The jewel in his crown brought him down. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Ruby
Weefatfella on 15-04-2013
Ruby
 photo UKABueeyedhush.gif
Aye Luigi, Well put.
It's a terrible thing an auld man chasin his youth, or somebody elses youth.
Ruby Rubacuori is to him a precious jewel.
Strange thing Lust! Thank You For the Moral Luigi! Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
Hi Paul. We must remember that though the spirit is willing, the flesh is weak. It doesn't matter how old one is, a lustful man's eye is forever roving. Having seen a photo of the 'heart stealer' I can see why he was tempted. The young lady, though, has denied any impropriety.
Cheers.

Nomenklatura on 18-04-2013
Ruby
Ah... a fake! A man looking with the penile eye, not the pineal third!
Never mind, we've all done it.
Ewan

Author's Reply:
It takes a connoisseur to spot a fake, Ewan, and not many representatives of the male species are apt to the task.
Perhaps it is, as you say, not being able to distinguish between penile and pineal.
Thanks for stopping by.
Luigi


Amelie (posted on: 15-04-13)
My entry to last week's Forum Prose/Poetry challenge.

My friend had a cousin whose name was Amelie but all who knew her well would call her Mimi. Half Italian, half French she hailed from Paree, we boys were seventeen and she twenty-three. She had an exotic beauty and we were lovesick; we had never seen a woman so elegant and chic. My pal who knew her better gave us this warning: boys, he said, you should see her in the morning. Her face without make-up is a shade of white, her bare looks repel when seen at first light. She needs foundation cream, potions and lotions and other products of which we have no notion. She'll apply her maquillage, layer upon layer; to be thought attractive is her constant prayer. Come on mate, we said, you are pulling our legs she's the epitome of class as sure as eggs is eggs. We couldn't care less about foundation cream she would always remain the girl of our dream. She went but she had caught our imagination and even to this day she holds our fascination. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Amelie
ifyouplease on 15-04-2013
Amelie
sweet!

Author's Reply:
Nice to hear from you, Nic. Efharisto.

amman on 15-04-2013
Amelie
Ah, the fascination of young puppy-love. 'Maquillage' - good word. Nice one, Luigi.
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
Hi Tony, this is actually a true story; we were all mesmerised by this exotic, and to our minds erotic, creature.
The memory lingers on.
Ciao.

Weefatfella on 15-04-2013
Amelie
 photo UKABueeyedhush.gifAye, Vanity thy name is Woman.
β€œThe most beautiful makeup of a woman is passion. But cosmetics are easier to buy.”
― Yves Saint-Laurent. Brilliant Luigi.
And very true.
"they will mesmerise and tantalise before they fraternise" Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
Hi WFF. I like Yves Saint-Laurent quotation, very apt.
"they will mesmerise and tantalise before they fraternise" by Weefatfella. That's also true but we wouldn't want it any other way, would we?
Thanks for the comment Paul.

Hekkus on 16-04-2013
Amelie
An interesting and clever poem. It touches on a question for our age: just what is real? Does it matter that we desire something which in fact doesn't exist in the real world?
One thing I would say: "her bare looks repel "...it makes sense, but I think "her bare flesh repels" sounds better. But it's your poem, and it was a good read.

Author's Reply:
I hear what you say, Hekkus, and thank you for the suggestion. By saying 'bare looks' I meant to point out how her face looked without make-up whereas 'bare flesh', in my opinion, would have meant her full body (which I wasn't lucky enough to examine).
I am much obliged to you for your kind feedback.

Pronto on 18-04-2013
Amelie
At you're seventeen you're wont to dream
And bugger all foundation cream foundation cream! πŸ˜‰
Good write poet.

Author's Reply:
Pronto, you are so right. At seventeen we didn't give a damn about the concoctions that women used, we just drooled at the finished product.
Cheers and thanks for reading.

ValDohren on 18-04-2013
Amelie
At 17, we all look for physical attraction in a partner, but as we mature (and boy, am I mature !!), its what's in the head that is more important.
As for little pots of powder and paint - wouldn't be seen dead without it.
Good one Luigi.

Val

Author's Reply:
Absolutely, Val. Youngsters are attracted by good looks but with maturity comes wisdom (or should) and attitudes change but no matter what transformation the body undergoes, happy and nostalgic memories will never age. Don't remind me about advancing years: I have the feeling that you have a long way to go to catch up with a Methuselah like me.
Cheers.

Luigi


Unbelievable (posted on: 08-04-13)
Following in Andrea's footsteps, I wrote this for a challenge on another site. You had to write a poem or story with 'I could not believe what came in the door' as the first line.

I could not believe what came in the door.... I wasn't wearing glasses, my eyesight was poor. I wanted to enquire what the postman brought; It was a travel brochure, that's what I thought. It invited me to visit…Niagara or Agra? I'm wrong. It was a prompt for me to buy Viagra. The photos in the leaflet were meant to titillate but parts of the anatomy had been pixellated. I reckon it's useless to embark on such a venture if one's behaviour leads to a great deal of censure. I thought long and hard if it was worth the corn but came to the conclusion that it was just porn. Besides, it's my belief that they acted in jest: I am not lacking in zest as they seem to suggest. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Unbelievable
Weefatfella on 08-04-2013
Unbelievable
 photo 6476617c-792a-4c7b-a60f-b80676cd1938_zps5eb0b534.jpg
I'm sure all your faculties are in good working order Luigi. Well your grey matter certainly is.
Enjoyed the larf Luigi!
Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
Hi Paul, I appreciate your confidence but I had a terrible thought: what if they are right? The laugh would be on them! No, I mustn't have negative vibes.

amman on 10-04-2013
Unbelievable
Ha Ha. 'Part of the anatomy had been pixellated'. Keep taking the tablets!
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
That's what I am trying to avoid, Tony. It may come a time when I have to admit defeat, but so far it's: no surrender.
Cheers.


Moral Dilemma (posted on: 08-04-13)
Religious leaders in Kenya wanted to ban an advert for condoms. (First posted on Poetry24 - 5/4/2013)

Today is market day. Women have come down from their remote villages to their nearest town. They greet one another among the busy stalls but pay scant attention to the vendors' calls. They talk about their lovers and extol their virility yet point out the dangers that go with promiscuity. The opinion is prevalent we ought to warn all maids not to indulge in shenanigans in case they catch Aids. It would be so much better if they could get protection but they are subjected to religious objection. Clerics of different creeds raise their hands in horror and declare we shall live in Sodom or Gomorrah. So prudence is requested and also self-control but, given human nature, it won't work at all. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Moral Dilemma
Weefatfella on 08-04-2013
Moral Dilemma
 photo 6476617c-792a-4c7b-a60f-b80676cd1938_zps5eb0b534.jpg
Aye Luigi, Well put.
I must applaud you for leaving out the obvious rhyme in
"They greet one another
among the busy stalls
but pay scant attention
to the vendors’ calls. "
Briliant and disciplined to boot!
Thanks Luigi,
Weefatfela.

Author's Reply:
Cheers Paul, applause gratefully received. You are right, one must avoid embarrassing rhymes.

cooky on 09-04-2013
Moral Dilemma
Religion never follows common sense. I often thing religion is the perfect disguise for the devil. Excellent write.

Author's Reply:
Couldn't agree more, cooky. I think Marx had it right when he said, if I recall correctly, that religion was the opium of the people. I appreciate hearing your opinion, thanks.

Bozzz on 09-04-2013
Moral Dilemma
Many Catholics in developed countries now ignore the ill-considered ideas that some Papal writs try to propagate. Sad that the results you illustrate hurt the rest of us in contagious sickness and - if I dare to say so, the public purse.... Good read, good piece Luigi....David

Author's Reply:
Thanks for the comment, David. While it is true that many Catholics now ignore Papal edicts on birth control, the position of their church is still anti-contraception. Other faiths too are opposed and in Kenya they are united in condemnation of the use of condoms even to the extent of wanting to ban advertisements.

Luigi

amman on 10-04-2013
Moral Dilemma
Good social message Luigi. Religious dogma causes so much misery. By the way. your book of poems now graces my Kindle alongside all the other 'classics'.
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
I see that we are in agreement Tony.
I hope that you enjoy my poems as much as the other 'classics'.
Thank you for reading and commenting.


Resurrection Mary (posted on: 01-04-13)
A restless spirit.

The legend of Resurrection Mary is well known in Justice, Illinois. It started with her being contrary and having a quarrel with the boy with whom she was, one winter night, dancing at the Oh Henry Ballroom. She walked in the road, in a dim light, and that was what led to her doom. She was run over by a speeding truck which didn't stop and left her to die. She wouldn't have met with bad luck if she had not argued with her guy. In Resurrection Cemetery she's buried but at night her ghost will hitchhike. Reports of this are many and varied and the apparitions uncannily lifelike. Her soul is looking for eternal peace, to escape from purgatory once for all and wishes her personal hell to cease. Maybe St Peter, from paradise, will call. © Luigi Pagano 2013 Note: There is a town in Michigan called Hell, one named Paradise in California and one Purgatory in Maine.
Archived comments for Resurrection Mary
Bozzz on 01-04-2013
Resurrection Mary
I married a Mary - against the advice of her closest friends. 64 years later - she's made her amends. But it is I myself who is destined for purgatory. Nice to know it exists. Good poem - thank you Luigi - you are ever generous....David

Author's Reply:
So, David, it wasn't your Mary that was contrary but her closest friends. Or was it you going against their advice? No matter really as your union seems to have lasted. Congratulations.
Thank you for your kind comment.

Luigi

ChairmanWow on 01-04-2013
Resurrection Mary
Luigi,
This lady's story was on my short list but you beat me to it. (I'm from Illinois) What a creepy ghost story it is and you did a great job with it.

Ralph

Author's Reply:
I am sorry to have stolen your thunder, Ralph, but at the same time I am pleased that you approve of my treatment of the story. It is quite a coincidence that we both thought of the same subject and also you being from Illinois.

Regards, Luigi

Savvi on 02-04-2013
Resurrection Mary
Well done Luigi another story well told with tight rhymes I hope I never meet Mary although she probably has a sister in every town.

Author's Reply:
You never know where she might be next, Savvi, the spirit world has no frontiers.
Cheers.


Damascus (posted on: 29-03-13)
Based on an Inspiration Point on ABCTales. Write a story or a poem without using the following letters: e, r, n, p, y

What to do to abolish bombs? How to halt vicious attacks? As mad mullahs claim jihad although tough is also just, blood shall flow, wall to wall; a lot of schools will shut too; most mums will wail with us. Walk about but avoid shots, a Scottish lad might follow suit. Wish us luck to assist Damascus. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Damascus
jay12 on 29-03-2013
Damascus
Not using e, r, n, p, y at all is impressive, especially not using the e! A tidy read considering the restraints of the challenge!

Jay.

Author's Reply:
Hi Jay. Long time no see, thanks for looking in. You are quite right, it wasn't an easy thing to do.

Luigi

My Book

Weefatfella on 29-03-2013
Damascus
 photo bfa015ef-03f8-441a-953a-e17b9b577756_zpsda0c5131.jpg
Aye well done Luigi. I am very impressed.
How many paracetamol were required afterwards? Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
Hiya Paul. The paracetamols were needed beforehand believe you me. It wasn't an easy task but, hey, poets are made of sterner stuff.

Cheers, Luigi

Bozzz on 29-03-2013
Damascus
I too am impressed with what you have written, Luigi. At the same time I feel bound to ask what is the literary value of such an exercise? Seems a daft ask to me - no real or valid purpose served. But perhaps my ignorance is showing...Bozzz

Author's Reply:
Hello David, thanks for your feedback. To answer your question, it was an exercise to test one's ingenuity when faced with some limitation. We may not see the value in mountaineers climbing mountains and, if asked why they do it, their answer would be: because they are there and are a challenge.
The purpose of writing and reading poetry is brought into question by some people; should we stop doing it?
Anyway, your query has raised a valid point which has put my grey cells into motion.

shadow on 29-03-2013
Damascus
That is clever - and says something important too. Well done.

Author's Reply:
Thanks for your approbation, Moya, much obliged.

Luigi x

My Book

Rupe on 30-03-2013
Damascus
Impressive stuff. Nicely terse. It's strange, isn't it, how these kinds of apparently random & apparently restrictive challenges often prompt really good writing?

Rupe

Author's Reply:
Very kind, Rupe, thank you. The randomness that you mention reminded me of those poems that are composed by using magnetic strips of metal with words on them. There too there is a limit to what one can do but satisfactory results can be achieved.

Luigi

My Book

ChairmanWow on 30-03-2013
Damascus
Hey Luigi. I agree with both Jay and Rupe. Enjoyed the poem.

Ralph

Author's Reply:
Ralph, so glad that you found this piece to your satisfaction and the message therein came through alright.
Thanks for stopping by.

Luigi

My Book

orangedream on 31-03-2013
Damascus
I know exactly how difficult this poem was to write, Luigi, and I really take my hat off to you. Not only did you achieve the goal of using none of the prohibited letters, but you also managed to write such a meaningful and emotive poem to boot! More than well done;-)

Tina xxx

Author's Reply:
Entirely agree, Tina. Disappointingly that on ABCtales, where the Inspiration Point was, it only generated two comments. On this site though people have been more forthcoming. Thanks for your support.

Luigi xxx


Smoke Signals (posted on: 25-03-13)
***

The smoke on the horizon was met by a joyful cry: Pinkerton was returning for Madam Butterfly. But when told the news she had to abandon hope. The smoke signal meant they'd elected a new Pope. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Smoke Signals
Savvi on 25-03-2013
Smoke Signals
Ha very typically topical well done. S

Author's Reply:
The Pope was elected so that I could write this little ditty.
Cheers.

shadow on 27-03-2013
Smoke Signals
Ah, shame! Neat verse, though.

Author's Reply:
Hi Moya. How very sad for Ying Huang to raise her hopes in seeing a puff of smoke ('un fil di fumo') but misinterpreting the signal.
Thanks for reading and commenting.

RoyBateman on 27-03-2013
Smoke Signals
And she wasn't even a catholic! What a bummer, eh? Still, when that bastard Pinkerton did finally return, she was in for a shock - perhaps it was better this way! Another good chuckle, Luigi.

Author's Reply:
You learn something new every day, Roy. She wasn't but is the Pope Catholic? I think we ought to know.
That Pinkerton had the cheek of the devil. He only went back, if I recall correctly, so that his wife could adopt the child he had with Madam Butterfly. A nasty business indeed.
Thanks for reading and commenting.


What Three Bears Said (posted on: 22-03-13)
***                                                                             

Too hard, too soft, too lumpy. That's what three bears said. No one in their right mind would sleep in such a bed. A homeless person sighed: you would if you were poor, of no fixed abode, and kipping on the floor. Someone who's endured a life of hard knocks would relish a mattress like that of Goldilocks. © Luigi Pagano 2013                               
Archived comments for What Three Bears Said
Fox-Cragg on 22-03-2013
What Three Bears Said
Nice twist to bring it real.
Like it.
Paul

Author's Reply:
Thanks Paul, much obliged.

Andrea on 22-03-2013
What Three Bears Said
And preferably with Goldilocks in it, too πŸ™‚

Liked your pome, Luigi...

Author's Reply:
You know me too well, Andrea.
Cheers.

Luigi x

Weefatfella on 22-03-2013
What Three Bears Said
 photo 390a8c45-a359-4a79-8c64-82ba272f2b94_zps941dd6b6.jpg
Yes Luigi, any old bed is better than cardboard and newspapers.
If anyone is chasing their oats , it;s better to have a Goldilocks in tow.
Good stuff, and true.
Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
Yes WFF, Goldilocks would be the cherry on the cake, but the bed would be a relief with or without her.
Thanks very much for reading and commenting.

Savvi on 22-03-2013
What Three Bears Said
Aqualung meets the three bears, nice, clever twist to add weight. very much enjoyed. S

Author's Reply:
Thank you for your kind comment, Savvi.


March the 19th (posted on: 18-03-13)
Our wedding anniversary.

roses and carnations photo: roses n carnations 146411.jpg I have a cogent reason to remember this date; I'd be accused of treason by my longstanding mate should I ever forget the day we tied the knot. She would be upset, I'd be put on the spot for showing no respect or lacking in affection; she may also suspect I have no recollection. I'm sure that the missus knows of my devotion and clearly she dismisses that unfounded notion. We are counting the hours to cherished celebrations. I will buy some flowers, roses or pink carnations. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for March the 19th
Kat on 18-03-2013
March the 19th
Just beautiful, Luigi. Wishing you both a very happy anniversary!

Kat x

Author's Reply:
Thanks Kim for your good wishes.

Luigi x

amman on 18-03-2013
March the 19th
You old romantic, Luigi. Seriously, fine words befitting a special occasion. I hope the flowers you buy are as nice as those shown here.
Congratulations.
Tony.

Author's Reply:
Hi Tony. Old yes but romantic? Well, OK. I have to preserve the reputation, at least in the eyes of my wife.
Thanks for the congratulations.

Mikeverdi on 18-03-2013
March the 19th
Great stuff Luigi, you are truly a silver tongued Cavalier! πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Hello Mike. Silver tongued, eh? I try my best.
Cheers.

Weefatfella on 18-03-2013
March the 19th
 photo 390a8c45-a359-4a79-8c64-82ba272f2b94_zps941dd6b6.jpg

Curs'd be the man, the poorest wretch in life,
The crouching vassal to a tyrant wife!
Who has no will but by her high permission,
Who has not sixpence but in her possession;
Who must to he, his dear friend's secrets tell,
Who dreads a curtain lecture worse than hell.
Were such the wife had fallen to my part,
I'd break her spirit or I'd break her heart;
I'd charm her with the magic of a switch,
I'd kiss her maids, and kick the perverse bitch
buon anniversario a tutti e due Luigi and Mrs Luigi.
I couldn't resist the Burns for this weeks Scots dilema. Weefatfella.


Author's Reply:
Poor guy, he must have endured a marriage from hell. No problem on this front, I'm happy to say. 47 years and counting.
Grazie mille signor Paolo da me e mia moglie che si chiama Joy.
Ciao.

Savvi on 18-03-2013
March the 19th
well done Luigi, who needs flowers when you can give her words like these. πŸ™‚ happy anniversary. Savvi

Author's Reply:
Much obliged to you for your wishes, Savvi. Thanks.

orangedream on 19-03-2013
March the 19th
Many, many congratulations, Luigi;-)

Wonderful flowers, and poem to match.

Tina xxx

Author's Reply:
Thanks dear Tina.

Luigi xxx

discopants on 19-03-2013
March the 19th
Very nice indeed- and happy anniversary!

Author's Reply:
Nice to hear from you, Keith. Thanks a lot for reading and for the wishes.

Luigi.

Andrea on 20-03-2013
March the 19th
Awww, lovely - congrats to you both πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Thanks Andrea. Pleased to say that our foundations are still solid compared to our kitchen's rotten floorboards which are being replaced at the moment.

Luigi x


She is One Hundred and Five (posted on: 11-03-13)
A refugee camp in Jordan. (First posted on http://poetry-24.blogspot.co.uk/)

A war correspondent comes to her tent, teeming with refugees, and asks her for a comment. She's one-hundred-and-five and says she wants to die. Not because she is too old, that's not the reason why. Her wish is not a whim but a sign of desperation. She has witnessed the futile destruction of her nation, the bombing, the shooting from both warring sides, she's seen the consequence of martyrs' suicides and now she is a frightened, defenceless spectator of the fight between the rebels and an unyielding dictator. On the streets of the capital the tanks ominously rumble, the mortar's shells explode and the edifices crumble. While hundreds of thousands have mercilessly been slain all attempts at diplomacy have, alas, been in vain. The outcome is uncertain and the outlook is bleak but their one and only hope is to find the peace they seek. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for She is One Hundred and Five
barenib on 11-03-2013
She is One Hundred and Five
Luigi, indeed the futility never seems to end and so we should keep writing about it! John.

Author's Reply:
We shall, John, but how many will heed our message? Comforting to hear supportive words.
Thanks.

shadow on 11-03-2013
She is One Hundred and Five
Yes, the situation is heart-breaking, and the awful thing is one fears that intervening might make it worse rather than better. All we can do is watch, and try to pick up the pieces.

Author's Reply:
And talks of intervention is what we hear more and more. How can equip the opposition with weapons save lives? It can only escalate and prolong the conflict.

cooky on 11-03-2013
She is One Hundred and Five
You capture her feelings very well in this write. I too saw her alone in that tent of despair.

Author's Reply:
Yes, cooky, it was a heart rending interview.
Thanks for reading and commenting.

Mikeverdi on 11-03-2013
She is One Hundred and Five
I also saw this, the pain etched into her face was hart rending to see; your words capture the scene well. Mike

Author's Reply:
It was a very revealing interview, Mike, and nobody could have failed to be moved.
Thanks for reading.

Weefatfella on 11-03-2013
She is One Hundred and Five
Weefat sh. photo f444513d-ee51-4e3a-901d-53b87f952c49_zps521058b0.jpg
The world is run by Monsters Luigi. The apathetic attitude of the rest of us, allows its continuance.
First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win. Mahatma Ghandhi.
I hope they find peace.
Thank you for highlighting this.
Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
You are so right, Paul. Wherever we look we find people killing each other and is not so much the apathy that makes things worse, it is third parties interventions however well intentioned they may be.

amman on 12-03-2013
She is One Hundred and Five
You paint a too graphic picture, Luigi of another futile conflict. One wonders at the aftermath if the rebels win and if the original rebellion has not been hijacked by extremists.
Very well expressed.
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
You made a very valid point, Tony. The outcome cannot be predicted. The fact that the conflict in Syria has been going on for two years without resolution but with many thousands of victims among the civilian population is a sign of the futility of hostilities. There is also, as you point out, the danger of extremists taking advantage of the perilous situation.

stormwolf on 12-03-2013
She is One Hundred and Five
A more sombe poem from you Luigi. Very sad and hard -hitting. I think you know my stance on war. Such suffering, everywhere!
One of your best
Alison x

Author's Reply:
I have always been vociferous against wars of any kind, Alison, and berated those who won't give peace a chance. This is another instance of how much suffering innocent people have to endure while wars are fought in the name of dogma.

Luigi x

Savvi on 12-03-2013
She is One Hundred and Five
Luigi
You cover this compelexed problem very well and give it the extened voice it deserves, very well done. S

Author's Reply:
As you say a complex situation with no satisfactory solution in sight.
Thanks for reading and commenting.

Griffonner on 12-03-2013
She is One Hundred and Five
Luigi,

Such a valuable message, excellently put across.

Allen

Author's Reply:
Hello Allen, how are you? We haven't heard from you for ages. Since the good old times of 'La FenΓͺtre' in fact.
Anyway, it's great that you still follow our efforts on UKA. So glad you like the poem and the message it contains.

All the best, Luigi.


Pronto on 12-03-2013
She is One Hundred and Five
Wow Luigi that was very well expressed and keenly observed mate but what can we do? We give charity and almost nothing reaches the one's in need. We give arms to the rebels they win then turn the arms on us! Depressing yes but t'was ever thus!

Author's Reply:
What can we do? That's the million dollar question, my friend, it is an uphill struggle. Perhaps we ought to have a hard look at ourselves and begin asking questions. Why do we sell arms to regimes we know of being unstable or why we support factions which welcome our intervention only to be accused of being foreign invaders once they have achieved their purpose? Why doesn't aid reach the ones who need it? Are we doing enough to stop corruption? Etc., etc. The list is inexhaustible.
Anyway, having got some things off my chest, it remains to me to thank you for your attention.



Andrea on 13-03-2013
She is One Hundred and Five
Excellent, Luigi. Not your usual style, true, but very hard-hitting and topical.

Author's Reply:
Thanks awfully, dear Andrea. Although it is in my nature to write about the lighter side of life, there are times when we have to consider serious issue.

Luigi x

Kat on 17-03-2013
She is One Hundred and Five
Luigi, so glad I had a long scroll and discovered this gem from you. A really excellent write, and when you feel the need, I think you could do more wonderful 'serious' pieces. Your style would lend itself to that very well, I think... not that I don't enjoy your usual style.

Kat x

Author's Reply:
Thank you kindly Kim. It just so happens that every now and then a 'serious' poem emerges from my head but I don't set out on purpose to produce one. I like to think that there is some sort of message in what I write even if the language is facetious.
You may be interested in seeing my latest collection 'Poetry On Tap', a paperback dispatched from and sold by Amazon.co.uk. @ Β£ 5.39
Sorry for the plug but if I don't blow my own trumpet, no one will.

Luigi x


Mother, Baby And Bath Water (posted on: 01-03-13)
My entry to this week's Forum Challenge, slightly edited.


She may be a scatterbrain who won't focus on what matters, but one thing she's sure to do: follow instructions to the letter. I told her: you must be careful, don't throw out our baby daughter when you empty the bath tub of the dirty and soapy water. She replied: I'm absentminded and perhaps you think me silly but I haven't gone doolally and will mind our darling Lily. What she said made me wonder, her retort put me on the spot as I was under the impression that the baby's name was Dot. There are many, varied, notions which I tend to misconstrue. That I grasped that aphorism is unquestionably not true. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Mother, Baby And Bath Water
amman on 03-03-2013
Mother, Baby And Bath Water
A nice rhythm to this Luigi, sort of Gilbert And Sullivan. Certainly made me chuckle and must have come close to winning the challenge.
Cheers.
Tony.

Author's Reply:
No Tony, Andrea won the contest with a really funny piece; mine was just mentioned in dispatches.

Cheers, Luigi.

stormwolf on 03-03-2013
Mother, Baby And Bath Water
I never guage my opinions on previous comments but I do happen to agree with Tony here Luigi. πŸ™‚
Alison x
PS The top of the page too I see...long over due and no mistake as Sunks would say πŸ˜‰

Author's Reply:
Thanks for your valued opinion Alison. I am still wading through the vast number of entries from Friday and I anticipate another deluge tomorrow. I find that time is getting short and will have to selective with my reading. As for being top of the page, it must be my lucky week: I have so far sold 5 paperback copies and one digital edition of my book 'Poetry On Tap'. As Tesco are fond of saying:every little helps.

Luigi x


Westminster Clerihews (posted on: 25-02-13)
Parliamentarians' sketches.

Nicholas Clegg didn't have to beg. He joined the coalition of his own volition.             *      John Vincent Cable is said to be able; he tells us he knows how the economy grows.            *    Ed Miliband wants us to understand that he has a plan B but it doesn't come free.            *      © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Westminster Clerihews
Kat on 25-02-2013
Westminster Clerihews
What a trio! Enjoyed.

Kat x

Author's Reply:
Thanks, Kat.

Luigi x

Andrea on 25-02-2013
Westminster Clerihews
Brilliant, Luigi!

Author's Reply:
Pleased you liked it.

Luigi x

cooky on 25-02-2013
Westminster Clerihews
sums up these simpletons perfectly. I like this

Author's Reply:
Glad that the message came across, cooky. Thanks for reading and commenting.

Texasgreg on 26-02-2013
Westminster Clerihews
Same phrases, different faces here so I don't have to know 'em the way you do.

Universally written!

Greg πŸ™‚

Photobucket.

Author's Reply:
You are so right Greg, you don't have to know them. The word 'politicians' defines them adequately.
Cheers.

amman on 26-02-2013
Westminster Clerihews
Don't really know much about your clerihewed trio, Luigi, but as politicians they undoubtedly deserve a bit of nonsensical satire. Really enjoyed.
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
I am sure there are their equivalent in New Zealand and other countries, Tony. They are a universal breed who need to be taken down a peg or two.

Best, Luigi

whatacutebum on 26-02-2013
Westminster Clerihews
Very nice πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Very kind, thank you.

CVaughan on 26-02-2013
Westminster Clerihews
Ah more c's that's short for the short form, not the ..... oh well you know what I mean. Tried'em myself. Your efforts are mighty fine unlike the subjects IMO of course.
Nibbed very worthily I see. Frank

Author's Reply:
I know exactly what you mean, Frank. Subjects are still under scrutiny but their conduct won't be judged until the year 2015. So satire is our only weapon.
Thanks for reading and commenting.


Midnight (posted on: 22-02-13)
My entry to Wednesday's Forum Prose/Poetry challenge. The word was MIDNIGHT.

Midnight's the witching hour when some find to their cost that if you miss the deadline a glass slipper gets lost, a coach becomes a pumpkin, horses turn into mice, the coachman into a rat and that's not very nice for a mistreated girl by the name of Cinderella who in the course of a dance has found a charming fella. She is now back in her kitchen and she has been there since she fled from the ball and the pursuing prince. He is very determined to find the pretty lass but the only way to trace her is a slipper made of glass. Did he ever succeed in his difficult task? I am really surprised that you should even ask. All the fairy stories, were bound to end well; justice always prevailed, as far as I can tell. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Midnight
cooky on 22-02-2013
Midnight
You tell the story well. I like this.

Author's Reply:
I was fascinated by fairy stories in my childhood and they still inspire me. Thanks for reading it.

amman on 22-02-2013
Midnight
An entertaining take on the Cinders tale, Luigi. Enjoyed. Like the way you rhymed Cinderella with feller (perhaps 'fella').
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
Thanks for the comment, Tony. As for feller/fella it can be either. According to the Free Dictionary:

felΒ·ler 2
n. Informal
A man or boy; a fellow.

Andrea on 24-02-2013
Midnight
Hahah, lovely Luigi!

(I do think 'fella' looks better though - never seen it spelt 'feller', although I see that it technically can be)

Author's Reply:
How can argue with a true Londoner? Fella it is. My apologies to Tony who suggested it first.
Thanks to both of you for putting me on the straight and narrow.

Luigi x

purplespirit on 27-02-2013
Midnight
Marvelously narrated Cindarella story and very clever connection to 'fella'. Enjoyed the read very much, thank you. Purple

Author's Reply:
My thanks to you for letting me know, purplespirit.


When Every Bird Comes To Choose His Mate (posted on: 18-02-13)
For this was on seynt Volantynys day Whan euery bryd comyth there to chese his make.
Geoffrey Chaucer - Parlement Of Foules (v 310)
EDITED

To celebrate romance is absolutely fine but it has nothing to do with Saint Valentine. Although the tradition that we follow is old we must not believe everything we're told, even by an esteemed poet: Geoffrey Chaucer, no less. I believe that he said, but solely to impress, that on the saint's date - February the 14th - birds will choose a mate. The inference is that the martyr is the symbol of loving courting couples but that is far too simple. The reference is weak, I can't see the link between love and the saint, whatever you may think. There were three holy men who shared the same name but of this martyred trio only one achieved fame. But it is no use now to learn the truth because it doesn't really matter who that person was. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for When Every Bird Comes To Choose His Mate
Kat on 20-02-2013
When Every Bird Comes To Choose His Mate
I'm laughing... should I be? As usual, am impressed by your wordsmanship.

Kat x

Author's Reply:
Laughing? And why not. I was poopoing the idea that the Valentine Day tradition was associated with the eponymous saint, so in a way the poem is partly satyrical. My argument was based on the fact that there is no historical evidence that a Saint Valentine was ever involved in affairs of the heart. It is uncertain whether St. Valentine is to be identified as one saint or two saints of the same name. What is certain than one of them died on the 14th of February.

Luigi x


Charles Dickens (posted on: 18-02-13)
A mini portrait.

Boz wrote a lot on the human condition translating real life into great fiction and he always came up with a good plot. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Charles Dickens
dylan on 18-02-2013
Charles Dickens
He did indeed, Luigi.
His pen name Boz means something quite rude in Glesca.
Will leave it to your imagination!
Nice poem, as ever.
Orrabest,

D.

Author's Reply:
Hi Jon. Being a Londoner, I doubt he realised the significance of that pseudonym. I can think of some Italian words that acquire a rude meaning in other languages. It's inevitable.
Thanks for your appreciation.

amman on 18-02-2013
Charles Dickens
Very true Luigi. He wrote stories like the dickens
Perhaps 'the' human condition on the 2nd line.
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
Hello Tony. Yes, the phrase 'what the Dickens' crossed my mind but resisted the temptation. I slightly changed the 2nd line to incorporate your suggestion and yet keep the rhythm. Many thanks.

Zoya on 18-02-2013
Charles Dickens
He did indeed! He was probably one of the best, when it came to depicting the plight of the downtrodden, the poor and the humiliated lot of the society...

Author's Reply:
Nice to hear from you Zoya.
He is an author that, quoting an old cliche, you either love or hate. I am a big fan of his and find his work very imaginative.

Luigi x

Savvi on 18-02-2013
Charles Dickens
never heard of him ;-), great little piece, nice job. S

Author's Reply:
No wonder you haven't heard of him, Savvi, he is a very private man.
Cheers.

barenib on 19-02-2013
Charles Dickens
What can I say - Dickens in a nutshell which I never thought I'd see! John

Author's Reply:
I have kept the information to a bare minimum, barenib. πŸ™‚

Andrea on 19-02-2013
Charles Dickens
Spot on! What a strange pen-name though πŸ™‚ Love Dickens. Never used 20 words where 200 will do...

Author's Reply:
I wonder how the pseudonym came about. Did he ever go to Glesca? See Dylan's comment.

Luigi x

Andrea on 19-02-2013
Charles Dickens
Here's one answer:

Why_did_Charles_Dickens_use_the_pseudonym_Boz

Author's Reply:

Andrea on 19-02-2013
Charles Dickens
Oh, here ya go!

Augustus Dickens was the son of John Dickens, a clerk in the Navy Pay Office at Portsmouth, and his wife, Elizabeth (nΓ©e Barrow).Charles Dickens's pen name, 'Boz', was actually taken from his youngest brother's family nickname 'Moses', given to him in honor of one of the brothers in The Vicar of Wakefield (one of the most widely read novels in the early 19th century), which when playfully pronounced through the nose became corrupted as 'Boses', and later shortened to 'Boz' - pronounced with a long vowel 'o' through the nose. -- WIKIPEDIA

Author's Reply:
Thanks Andrea. An interesting explanation.

Luigi x

Kat on 20-02-2013
Charles Dickens
I've been mulling this one over for a couple of days... I really like it as I'm a Dickens fan, so I echo barenib's comment: what an achievement - on another note I had the pleasure of attending a wonderful Dickens' festival in Galveston, Texas a few years back where his great great grandson was the star attraction in the parade and signed Dickens' books afterwards, my lovely husband queued for an hour and a half to get him to sign an old edition of Five Christmas Novels while I drank hot cider with friends which all told was a wonderful experience and now I must go as I have great expectations that hard times will be met by me if I don't get on with this tale of two Dickens's and I want more porridge.

Kat x

Author's Reply:
I too am a Dickens fan. I had the idea for this piece after I posted this short precis of 'Great Expectations' in a Forum Prose/Poetry challenge four or five weeks ago:

Great Expectations

Hiding behind a tombstone
Magwitch waits.
Might Pip’s return
mean salvation?
Soldiers in hot pursuit
will soon thwart
his expectations.

Lots of love, Luigi x


At Her Majesty's Pleasure (posted on: 11-02-13)
A sobering thought.

It takes a lot of courage to admit you're ''doing porridge''. It means you cannot hide the fact that you are inside one of H.M.'s prisons, for a variety of reasons. We know it makes you sick to have landed in the nick. It is the monarch's pleasure that you forgo your leisure in a penal institution. It's the just retribution for a number of wrongdoings and it may be long innings before rehabilitation, so consider meditation. Take stock of your mistakes, don't attempt any jailbreaks, serve your sentence in peace and you'll soon get a release. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for At Her Majesty's Pleasure
Pronto on 11-02-2013
At Her Majestys Pleasure
Good write mate and there but for the grace of god etc...

Author's Reply:
Thanks for the comment, Pronto. 'There but for the grace of god...'. You are quite right, we have to be thankful that we still have our liberty.

stormwolf on 12-02-2013
At Her Majestys Pleasure
A good one Luigi!
Would hate to land in the clink but at least they get three meals a day. Do you know they budget more for prisioners' than for hospital patient's meals? disgusting.

Disgrunteld Edinburgh



Author's Reply:
Even with three meals a day I don't think I'd like the experience of being locked up.
There are a lot of wrong priorities, one being the one you mentioned and you are right to feel disgruntled.
Ta for the read and the comment.

Luigi x

Andrea on 13-02-2013
At Her Majestys Pleasure
Nice one Luigi - thankfully I never got further than the cop-shop πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Luckily my only involvement with the law was to ask a policeman directions.

Luigi x


Noah's Mistake (posted on: 11-02-13)
Back to the drawing board.

Most people know the story of the Ark that Noah built so that he and his family could escape the great flood. It was made of hard wood and its length was 300 cubits. Noah wasn't very skilled but had carpentry in his blood. One might think the deed was selfish, just to save his kith and kin, but God had ordered him to preserve the world's fauna and when the boat was made not only was there room for many pairs of animals but also for his sauna. As it often happens there's Murphy and his law, 'if something can go wrong it most certainly will.' He'd made one big mistake: each beastly specimen should consist of one pair and that would fit the bill. But in his haste to comply he had overlooked that rabbits soon multiply; a 30-day gestation produces large litters and the Ark's limited space was overran with bunnies, creating panic station. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Noah's Mistake
amman on 11-02-2013
Noahs Mistake
Nice one Luigi. Enjoyed. I guess the place was soon flooded with the furry creatures.
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
Yes Tony, we can definitely say that the Ark was awash with bunnies.
Cheers.

RoyBateman on 11-02-2013
Noahs Mistake
Ah, the bible story that must have given Darwin the heebie-jeebies, eh? Great humorous take on it though, Luigi! I've always wondered what sort of a job Noah must have had on the door..."No, bugger off! We've got two elephants already! I don't care if you HAVE got executive backstage passes... Love, we HAVE got elephants, haven't we? Thought so! Sorry, next please. Two hippos, got those...hang on, one's gay so you're in. Next!"

Author's Reply:
It was animal discrimination, Roy. Why only two allowed? There were four male and four female humans on board. As for the gay hippo, hadn't they heard of the Equality Act? The whole enterprise was a government mismanagement. Noah should have had a plan B.

stormwolf on 11-02-2013
Noahs Mistake
Haha An untold side to the old story.
Enjoyed it.

Alison x

Author's Reply:
Only people in the know were privy to this, Alison.

Luigi x

CVaughan on 11-02-2013
Noahs Mistake
Good humourous take on the old tale Luigi, well done again, enjoyed contemplating. A thought, creating also the rabbit pie maybe.

Author's Reply:
The thought must have crossed their mind, Frank.

Pronto on 11-02-2013
Noahs Mistake
Good flow of humour here well penned mate.
I reckon it must have been Noah who invented rabbit pie then!

Author's Reply:
Hi Pronto, thanks for reading and commenting. I wouldn't put it past Noah to have taken advantage of that meat supply.

cooky on 11-02-2013
Noahs Mistake
A very pleasant read which I think my grand ids would like.

Author's Reply:
Thanks cooky. Do read it to them and let me have their critique. Out of the mouth of babes...

butters on 11-02-2013
Noahs Mistake
maybe noah planned ahead - nice supply of fresh meat for the trip, all those hungry carnivores *nods* think he might have needed more than a single pair, though πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Maybe he did, butters, but his wife was no bunny-boiler and wouldn't allow him to put the plan into action: she adopted them as pets.

Luigi x

franciman on 11-02-2013
Noahs Mistake
Hi Luigi,
One less Elephant is the answer, methinks.
Great write and a great laugh.
cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Only one elephant, Jim, would have meant no reproduction and the extinction of the species. This sacrifice for a bunch of oversexed bunnies? If they were of the Hugh Hefner's variety I might think twice.
Cheers.

stormwolf on 12-02-2013
Noahs Mistake
Only people in the know were privy to this, Alison.

Luigi x

A tad before my time I have to admit Luigi πŸ˜‰
x

Author's Reply:
Aren't you a believer in reincarnation, dear Alison? Some say that we have lived in a previous existence.

Luigi x

Andrea on 13-02-2013
Noahs Mistake
I always thought that ark must've been the size of a planet, anyway πŸ™‚ Poor ol' Noah, eh?

Author's Reply:
I imagined it to be like Doctor Who's Tardis, with a small exterior but with an expanding interior. Thanks for reading.

Luigi x

Savvi on 14-02-2013
Noahs Mistake
I'm sure natural selection would take care of business all them free meals hoping around. great poem. S

Author's Reply:
They are the epitome of the survival of the fittest, Savvi, they just go forth and multiply.
Much obliged for your appreciative comment. Thanks.


The Fugitive (posted on: 04-02-13)
Down memory lane: a TV series of the sixties.

Perhaps you are too young and do not know the story. It was a tale of murder and the details were gory. I remember watching it on a black and white TV. It was extremely popular in nineteen-sixty-three. The wife of Doctor Kimble is murdered in her house; the husband is convicted of having killed his spouse. The prisoner is being taken by train to death row but he manages to escape and is free to hunt his foe who is a one-armed man, the real villain of the piece. He is the one responsible for Kimble's wife's decease. Our hero keeps on running, he goes from place to place and is always very careful to whom he shows his face. He finds himself involved in dangerous situations, risks his life several times and suffers tribulations. His pursuit comes to an end, he finally clears his name but from that day onwards TV hasn't been the same. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for The Fugitive
stormwolf on 04-02-2013
The Fugitive
ha ha, I vaguely remember it Luigi. Another witty one from your pen.

Alison x

Author's Reply:
Surely you were too young to even vaguely remember, dear Alison.

Luigi x

bo_duke99 on 04-02-2013
The Fugitive
rattles along like tha train he escaped from

Author's Reply:
Glad that somebody else recalls that popular show. Thanks for reading and commenting.



Mikeverdi on 04-02-2013
The Fugitive
You have a gift for this style, and yes I remember it well. Mike

Author's Reply:
Thanks for your nice comment, Mike. It is a kind of narrative poem and I like to give some flavour of the topic
contained in it.
It looks as if more people than I imagined do remember the series.
Cheers.

niece on 05-02-2013
The Fugitive
Luigi, have seen bits and parts and my folks used to be hooked, ,methinks, because the title definitely rings a bell...as always a superb piece of work πŸ™‚

Regds,
niece

Author's Reply:
Hi Mini. It was a popular TV series (from 1963 to 1967) with David Janssen, William Conrad and others. It was made into a film with Harrison Ford in 1993 but in my opinion the TV version was more engrossing.
Your comment is much appreciated.

Regards, Luigi.

Savvi on 05-02-2013
The Fugitive
I have the remake on DVD, and I really enjoyed the way you tell the story through verse always witty with great timing both comedic and meter. Thanks S

Author's Reply:
Hi Savvi. I thought that sharing the story that I remember enjoying at the time would be a good exercise in stimulating the brain into action. Always difficult to think of new ideas. Worth trying when nice comments like yours are received. Many thanks.

soman on 07-02-2013
The Fugitive
Poem as packed with suspense as the serial had been; and amusing too!!

Author's Reply:
Soman, much obliged. Many thanks.

Andrea on 07-02-2013
The Fugitive
Yes, I remember that, Luigi! Good pome about a good prog πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
It's all very well remembering but the trouble with nostalgia is that it reveals my age. Do I care that people know that I am a methuselah? Not a bit. Mind you it is a pleasure to be read by a spring chicken like you, Andrea.

Luigi x

Weefatfella on 07-02-2013
The Fugitive
 photo UKABueeyedhush.gif
Aye Luigi, The guy wasn't looking closely enough.
There were one-armed bandits in every corner shop then.
Very well done, I enjoyed the memory and your fine penmanship. Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
Yes WFF, there plenty of those in Las Vegas too. He didn't have to look far.
Thanks for your uplifting comment.
Cheers.


A Game Of Roulette (posted on: 28-01-13)
The merry widow.

I had fair warning that marrying Annette was the equivalent of a game of roulette. You play, place your bet and hope for a big win but it is all dependent on how the ball will spin. All her former husbands are now six feet under. Poison didn't take long to put them asunder. She had a hand in that and thinks she's a winner but she will pay the price like any other sinner. The insurers have said that a cheque has been sent but they are suspicious, their dogs are on the scent. I won't join her in her play, I believe that it stinks. I will indulge instead in a game of tiddlywinks. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for A Game Of Roulette
bo_duke99 on 28-01-2013
A Game Of Roulette
finished with a flourish, made me laugh

Author's Reply:
Jolly good, my objective has been achieved. Thanks.

Savvi on 29-01-2013
A Game Of Roulette
Made me laugh, you cant beat a good game of tiddlywinks. S

Author's Reply:
With tiddlywinks one goes forward in leaps and bounds. Thanks for reading and commenting.

Kazzmoss on 29-01-2013
A Game Of Roulette
Enjoyed that, it was good fun!


Author's Reply:
Hi Kazz, nice to hear from you after a long absence. How are you keeping? Pleased that you enjoyed this. Thanks.

stormwolf on 31-01-2013
A Game Of Roulette
You always make me smile Luigi. You really do.
I hope you see now that women are a bad lot but you cannot do without them.
πŸ˜‰

Alison x


Author's Reply:
Oh, I have known for some time that women are a bad lot. Good job I am a tolerant chap.

Luigi x


Mature & Single (posted on: 25-01-13)
An ad on Facebook.

She lives 3 miles away, she's mature and single, an ad on Facebook says. She's sociable; will mingle. I am temped, I'll admit. I wonder: can I catch her? I'm ancient, though quite fit, but not a cradle-snatcher. I found out that she's forty and far too young for me. Besides, I think it's naughty as I am not really free. The wife (and the mistress) would have something to say. They would call me feckless and send me on my way. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Mature & Single
amman on 25-01-2013
Mature & Single
Ha,ha. The wife and the mistress; you old dog, you.
Enjoyed.
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
You know the old saying, Tony, "The grass is greener on the other side of the fence". I am just testing the theory.
Cheers.

stormwolf on 25-01-2013
Mature & Single
Gave me a laugh.
Best to stick to the devil/s you know Luigi! πŸ˜‰
Alison x

Author's Reply:
I do, Alison. But what's happened to 'a change is as good as a rest'?
Glad you saw the humour.

Luigi x

barenib on 25-01-2013
Mature & Single
Luigi, just don't get tempted to 'like' her, and definitely don't 'poke' her πŸ™‚
I enjoyed this too - John.

Author's Reply:
No fear, John. But there are some who can't resist the temptation.
Thanks for reading and commenting.

cooky on 25-01-2013
Mature & Single
Your never too old for a bit of hows your father as they say in Sheffield.

Author's Reply:
...or a little of what you fancy...?

Mikeverdi on 25-01-2013
Mature & Single
Ha Ha! brilliant, post your auto, its sounds as if it could be fun!! Mike

Author's Reply:
Thanks Mike. There is some dispute as to whether it could be fun. Judgement has been suspended.

Bozzz on 26-01-2013
Mature & Single
Luigi, seriously, in the interests of all poetry lovers, you should have a go. For sure we will enjoy the inevitable trail of traumas and the interesting verses that will result. I am sure your wife and mistress(es?) will understand our needs.... Jealousy in this quarter...David....P.S.Happy to award an extra point for this poem if you proceed !

Having read your great reply, Whether 'in' or 'out', I will make sure my Human Rights will be infringed.

Author's Reply:
David, I wouldn't want to ignore the wishes of poetry lovers but, in the interest of fairness, I am going to hold a "In or Out" referendum. I am in favour of staying in (as long as I can) and I imagine the resultant trauma if my membership is prematurely curtailed.

Texasgreg on 28-01-2013
Mature & Single
Lol! Ya really brought a full smile to me on this 'un, Luigi.
No sense fighting the wife and mistress over a forty year-old. Maybe two twenty year-olds...

Greg πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Two twenty year-old? That would be the cherry on the cake. Thanks for the suggestion, Greg, but perhaps the fare might prove too rich for me. Still, no harm in dreaming.

Luigi:-)


The Lion King (posted on: 21-01-13)
The musical: a review in verse.

Yesterday I went to see the Lion King, at the Palace; the story tells us of sadness and solace, of unrest in the jungle, of treachery and guilt, and the tragic events that saw Mufasa killed. The costumes were fantastic, the choreography magical; there were touches of humour but it was never farcical. The actress playing the shaman - Rafiki, the mandrill - was in my view the best. She showed great skill. The plot is straightforward: with the old lion dead, Scar, his younger brother, claims to be the head of the distressed pride as Simba, the orphaned cub, is too feeble to fight and there is the rub. He also feels responsible for his dad's demise but a self-imposed exile is not very wise. The future seems uncertain as anyone can tell but, in the Bard's words, all's well that ends well. The rightful heir triumphs and the usurper dies. Order is now restored among joyful cries. Simba unites with Nala, his one and only love, the spirit of Mufasa watches from above. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for The Lion King
Weefatfella on 21-01-2013
The Lion King
Photobucket
Aye, Luigi, that about sums it up.
enjoyed,
Weefatfella

Author's Reply:
It was quite an experience: two senior citizens among a multitude of excited schoolchildren. But we enjoyed the show as much as they did.
Thanks for reading Weefatfella.

Texasgreg on 22-01-2013
The Lion King
Aye! Tou had every right to watch it with "pride", hehe...

Good job, Luigi!

Greg πŸ™‚

Photobucket.

Author's Reply:
That was the "mane" reason I went, Greg.

Luigi πŸ™‚

bo_duke99 on 22-01-2013
The Lion King
shades of Hamlet

Author's Reply:
True, I can see the parallel. Thanks for pointing out.

Savvi on 23-01-2013
The Lion King
Got tickets, my appetite is now truly wetted. S

Author's Reply:
If it is the same troupe as the one at the Palace Theatre in Manchester you'll thoroughly enjoy the experience. The show was terrific.

stormwolf on 23-01-2013
The Lion King
I have only ever seen excerpts of it but loved the title song by Elton John.
Now I know how the story goes you have saved me 7 quid or I don't really know what the price of a cinema ticket is nowadays.
Enjoyed reading as always

Alison x

Author's Reply:
Dear Alison, it wasn't the cinematic version I went to see but a live performance. As I have said it was a superb show and one that I would recommend. Knowing the story - utterly predictable - doesn't detract from one's enjoyment. The song, 'Hakuna Matata', by Elton John and Tim Rice was good as was all the other music.
If 'The Lion King' comes your way, don't miss it. It may cost more than 7 quid, though.

Luigi x

niece on 24-01-2013
The Lion King
Must have been a fabulous show, Luigi...heard it is so and your poem now makes me want to watch it all the more...

Regds,
niece

Author's Reply:
Hi Mini. It is true that the show has had excellent reviews. I am glad that the poem has aroused your curiosity in that direction.

Luigi x

Kat on 24-01-2013
The Lion King
*The Lion King is coming Alison's way!*



It will be at the Edinburgh Playhouse from Oct this year and I plan to take my son to see it - he loves the film.



Another excellent write, dear Luigi. You gave me paws for thought...



Kat x

Author's Reply:
Just to continue the line of puns (Greg- pride; myself- mane, you- paws) : Simba is a creature easy to lionise.
'The Lion King' is touring the country and is showing in Manchester until the 30th April. I am positive that you and your son will enjoy it.

Luigi x

P.S. Have you put that little typo to test me?

Kat on 24-01-2013
The Lion King
What typo, dear Luigi?

Kat x ;^)

Author's Reply:
Haha, very good Kat. I have now to solve the mystery of the vanishing apostrophe.

Love, Luigi x


Beauties and Beasts (posted on: 18-01-13)
***

It's undeniable what the aphorism says: that beauty is in the eye of the beholder. This truism is accepted across the world without regard to any country's border. That opposites attract is a known fact which equally applies to West and East. How ugliness is no barrier to love, we see in the fairy tale 'The Beauty and the Beast'. And yet it seems that we feel some shame in acknowledging physical disability, since in every fairy story and fable that I've read the ogre always becomes a handsome prince. Usually a kiss or a magic wand does the trick but we even encounter situations whereupon nature itself, not magic, is the catalyst. Then the ugly duckling metamorphoses into a swan. In real life the truth is somewhat mundane; couples may be ill suited, too fat or too thin, she stunning, he ordinary, and still be content: what is most important is the beauty within. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Beauties and Beasts
amman on 18-01-2013
Beauties and Beasts
Cleverly written and admirable sentiments, Luigi. The beauty within, indeed. Good stuff.
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
Thanks Tony.

Luigi πŸ™‚

butters on 18-01-2013
Beauties and Beasts
the beauty within is, truly, where it's at. some interesting observations here, luigi πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Your comment is very much appreciated, butters.

Luigi x

Andrea on 19-01-2013
Beauties and Beasts
Quite right, Luigi!

Author's Reply:
It's a fact of life that we must acknowledge. Thanks for reading.

Luigi x

franciman on 19-01-2013
Beauties and Beasts
A philosophical gem Luigi. I find some of our poetic brethren concentrate on superficial beauty, to the detriment of their verse.
Hark at the pot!
cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
You are right, Jim. For some beauty is only skin deep.
Cheers,
Luigi

cooky on 19-01-2013
Beauties and Beasts
The truth is never a fairy story. I like this.

Author's Reply:
Hi cooky. As you rightly say, the truth is never a fairy story. We must make the most of what nature has given us. I am much obliged for your comment.
Best, Luigi

Romany on 19-01-2013
Beauties and Beasts
Bravo! Great message, really well written. And I hadn't thought that, about the fairy tales, before. Interesting.

Author's Reply:
Hello Sue, nice to hear from you. I hope that you and Romany mark II are well.
I suppose it's not usual to see parallels between fairy tales and real life but fables can provide morals and meanings applicable to everyday events.
Keep in touch.

Luigi x


Lost In Transit (posted on: 14-01-13)
Lack of concentration.

Being less than attentive, for me, is not the norm and yet I'm now stranded on a Crewe platform having boarded, in error, an Inter-City train. It is an aberration that goes against the grain. I'm usually punctilious, and, I dare say, quite able; I check the destination and study the timetable but this time I misfired and lost my concentration. Perhaps you would like to hear an explanation of what addled my brain and distracted my attention. It boils down to aesthetics (but not with lewd intention). Long legs and white hot pants, she stood among the crowd like a goddess from Olympus: her countenance was proud. All males, myself included, admiring her perfection, lost all sense of proportion and also their connection. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Lost In Transit
amman on 14-01-2013
Lost In Transit
Ha ha, you old lecher you. Very enjoyable and skilfully penned.
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
Tony, the words leopard and spots come to mind. Too old to reform. I thought a bit of humour might lessen the Monday blues.
Regards, my friend.

cooky on 14-01-2013
Lost In Transit
I like this one. Beauty can takes us to some strange places.

Author's Reply:
Indeed it can, cooky, but I am quite happy to be led astray.

Texasgreg on 14-01-2013
Lost In Transit
Aye, Luigi!
Right connection if you get my meaning...just a destination to nowhere, I'm afraid. πŸ™

Cool write on distractions that plague the most sensible of minds.

Greg πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Aye, Greg. When it comes to attractive limbs, common sense goes out of the window. I must admit I am a recidivist on that score.

Luigi πŸ™‚

Mikeverdi on 16-01-2013
Lost In Transit
Brilliant!! It brightened up my day. Mike

Author's Reply:
Mike, too kind. You know how to boost one's morale. Thanks.

Luigi πŸ™‚


Say 'Cheese' (posted on: 14-01-13)
''Poets have been mysteriously silent on the subject of cheese.'' ― G.K. Chesterton, Alarms and Discursions

G.K. Chesterton said that poets have been mysteriously silent on the subject of cheese. Please! I am forever vociferously preaching the virtues of lactic produce. It's the kind of food that is bound to seduce. I have always praised the flavour of Cheddar, the humble 'mousetrap', or the blue Gorgonzola on which I was raised. The Hungarian Balaton is one that excites me; it's compact and mild with a pleasant acidity. And I say: bring it on. Bel Paese, semi-soft, or the spicy Boursin, are also good choices. So come on, my friends, let G.K. hear our voices and ensure he amends his sceptical stance. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Say 'Cheese'
Weefatfella on 14-01-2013
Say Cheese
Photobucket
I once was offered a wedge of cheese as payment for a taxi fare.
I accepted, the guy had nothing else. I hope the crows and seagulls enjoyed his offering.
I enjoyed the poem Luigi.
Thank You for posting.
Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
Were you considerate enough, WFF, to offer the birds some cheese crackers as well?
Glad you enjoyed the poem, many thanks.

Luigi.

amman on 14-01-2013
Say Cheese
Nothing cheesy about this one, Luigi. I'm a bit of a Philistine when it comes to exotic cheeses, so thanks for the lactic education.
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
Tony, I am not an expert either. I just examine the cheeseboard and pick at random. If I don't like my choice it won't be part of my menu. It is the gastronomic equivalent of kissing a lot of frogs in search of a prince.
I have built my lactic education over the years.
Cheers.

franciman on 14-01-2013
Say Cheese
Hi Luigi,
What a lot you know about cheese? Very Freudian don't you think?
Loved this.
cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Absolutely Freudian, Jim. He did say that any number of objects could be a source of pleasure and cheese fits the bill, wouldn't you say?
Tak, as the Danish say. (I learned this by watching 'Borgen': they say tak a lot.)

Corin on 14-01-2013
Say Cheese

β€œPoets have been mysteriously silent on the subject of cheese.”
― G.K. Chesterton, Alarms and Discursions

Not So, at least not by this poet:-

If All the World Were Made of Cheese
---------------------------------------------

If all the world were made of cheese
And all the women in it
Were round and soft and plump as peas
And love had no sin it
I would pick the plumpest roundest pea
And set it in a cut glass bowl,
Displayed for all the world to see,
This great delight that moves my soul.

O some do love a hard white pearl
Or a lustrous diamond brilliant,
But I have learnt to love full well
My soft plump pea sweet and ardent.
She has no flint beneath her skin
No sandy grit lurks inside
She's fragrant outside and within;
She has no faults she needs to hide.

Though all my life I will praise peas
I 'll save my love for the sweetest one,
Every day I'll strive to please
My little lovely round green sun.
Sadly between me and my love
There is a mighty sea of cheese,
I fear that I will never sea
That most beautiful of peas.

Dave

Author's Reply:
Whilst I laud your good attempt, Dave, your poem does not tackle the subject of cheese in the way that GKC meant. The use of the word 'cheese' as an analogy is a bit of a tenuous reference IMHO.
But thanks for letting me have a look at your own interpretation.

karen123 on 14-01-2013
Say Cheese
I think there is actually a lot more out there when it comes to cheese - my son has been driving us mad with this song for several weeks now
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N-mSFIzegHQ
It is a great piece and I might even try and find a couple of the ones you have listed here

karen

Author's Reply:
The list of available cheeses and their variety is indeed very long. I quite like the Dutch Leardammer. It is similar to Emmental in texture but not in flavour. Whatever you choose, enjoy it.
Thanks for passing by.

Luigi x

Bozzz on 14-01-2013
Say Cheese
Luigi I do agree. I think we owe the creator of the moon some thanks for reealising that weight reduction was needed to avoid excessively high tides on earth. The area that is made of cheese, undiscoverd by NASA, fulfils that function. Liked the poem, but felt a slight lack of emotional gushing, erotic desire etc. ... David.

Author's Reply:
I felt a bit shy about revealing my erotic desire, David, but it is there. I tend to have lightly salted crackers with lashings of nice and creamy Dolcelatte just before bedtime. The dreams that it generates are beyond belief.
I am still not convinced that parts of the Moon are made of Blue Stilton but then I am an old cynic.

Andrea on 14-01-2013
Say Cheese
If you lived here, Luigi, you'd be silent too - Edam, yuk!

I wrote a 'pome' about cheese once, I'll have to dig it out!

Author's Reply:
I agree with you about Edam, Andrea but there are other cheeses from Holland:
hard cheeses: Boeren Leidenkaas, Friesekaas, Friesian, Leyden, Smoked Gouda
semi-hard cheeses: Leerdammer, Maasdam
soft cheeses: Kernhem
take your pick.

Luigi x

Andrea on 15-01-2013
Say Cheese
True, but you can't beat a bit o' extra strong cheddar πŸ˜‰

Author's Reply:
Too true, can't argue with that.

dylan on 15-01-2013
Say Cheese
Chesterton (or Cheeseterton) would be proud of you, Luigi.
Personally, I think that Doctrates in Cheeseology should be compulsory in every university.

La Grand Fromage,
D.

Author's Reply:
This was my fromage to Cheeserton, Dylan. I agree that anyone who wants to be a big cheese needs a doctorate in that subject.

butters on 15-01-2013
Say Cheese
i found this write a bit cheesy... :p


cheese rocks. a world without cheese would be a barren place indeed.

Author's Reply:
Glad you didn't say that it was not worth a cracker otherwise I would have been in a pickle.

Savvi on 15-01-2013
Say Cheese
Black bomber is my fab love cheese love your poem I'm off to cut a slice cheddar πŸ™‚ S

Author's Reply:
Thanks for pointing this out, Savvi. It looks absolutely scrumptious.

Kat on 16-01-2013
Say Cheese
Love this, Luigi! And I love cheese... could live from bread, cheese and soup... and wine!

Excellento write. You exert your usual rhythmic mastery.

Kat x

Author's Reply:
We are twin souls, dear Kim, I too could live on that diet.

Luigi x

Kat on 16-01-2013
Say Cheese
PS: Meant to say, there's a wee typo:

'let’s G.K....' - ? should be just 'let'.

x

Author's Reply:
What can I say, my dear eagle-eyed kitten. Mea culpa. It always happens to me when I modify a line in mid stream and don't check the result. And to think that typos are my pet hates. Serves me right. Must do better.

Luigi x

Texasgreg on 20-01-2013
Say Cheese
Luigi,

Have an affinity fer feta, myself. I dare not say that whilst getting my picture taken, though. πŸ˜‰

I must congratulate you on being able to make cheese into palatable poetry...

Greg


Author's Reply:
Greg, I must apologise for not having replied before, the reason being that notifications don't always reach me. Now, having come across your comment by chance, have the opportunity to thank you for it.

Luigi πŸ™‚


For Whom The Bell Tolls (posted on: 11-01-13)
My entry to the Forum weekly challenge. The theme was BELLS.

Thanks to Hemingway, who borrowed the eponymous title from John Donne, I came across the latter's meditations and his musings on people's mortality. ''Nunc Lento Sonitu Dicunt, Morieris'', the bell's toll tells him, we must all die; no need to ask for whom the bell strikes. The poet states that 'no man is an island' and, as we are all involved in mankind, any man's death is bound to affect us all. Whenever I hear the church bell's knell to give warning of a forthcoming funeral my heart misses a beat and I reflect that our life is just transient, ephemeral. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for For Whom The Bell Tolls
amman on 12-01-2013
For Whom The Bell Tolls
Nice classical write, Luigi. Good moralistic message and doesn't time gallop on when we get older. I might have been tempted to finish the first verse with 'for whom the bell tolls' viz a vie Ernest Hemingway. (Just a thought).
Regards.

Author's Reply:
Hi Tony. Seeing that I 'borrowed' most of the stuff from John Donne, and even used it in the title, I thought that paraphrasing some of his text would make it a bit more personal.
You are so right about time galloping when we get older. No sooner we get up than it's time to draw the curtains on a dark evening.

deed on 12-01-2013
For Whom The Bell Tolls
Another fine poem and just what I was thinking. I have been to so many funerals lately.

Author's Reply:
It is an odd feeling when you hear of someone's death but all you can recall is their youthful image. Yet, to quote an old clichΓ©, time waits for no man.
Thanks for reading and commenting, deed.

Texasgreg on 12-01-2013
For Whom The Bell Tolls
Aye, Luigi!

I really like what you've been able to do with the topic. A wonderful piece that I hope many read and actually think on.

Greg πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Hi Greg. I believe that the thought of mortality is present in all of us, though some will push it to the back of their mind hoping to prolong the inevitable outcome.

Luigi πŸ™‚

RoyBateman on 13-01-2013
For Whom The Bell Tolls
Indeed - a chilling thought, Luigi. Ever since I did The Metaphysical Poets as part of my A-Level English, just a few years ago now, I've known that they saw the realities of life and sex with an amazingly honest, clear vision. Perhaps we've forgotten that attitude, or, more likely, we simply don't want to think about it. It's good to be reminded, so thanks - not as light as your usual work, but certainly a refreshing change!

Author's Reply:
Hi Roy. A stark reminder of the grim reaper will keep us on our toes.
I shall return with my lighter work tomorrow.
In the meantime cheers and thanks for the feedback.

stormwolf on 13-01-2013
For Whom The Bell Tolls
A different style for you Luigi.
I enjoyed this peep into the darker part.

Alison x πŸ˜€

Author's Reply:
Certain topics are best dealt in a sober style. Much obliged to you for reading and rating this poem.

Luigi x


Q and A (posted on: 07-01-13)
on Titus Andronicus.

Who on earth is this chap called Titus Andronicus? Is he an obscure character invented by Ionicus? Because I am quite certain I don't know him from Adam. He's not one of my inventions, I can assure you Madam, but one of William Shakespeare assisted by George Peele . They wrote of this general who was a man of steel. So, was he a real warrior or a fictitious one? If the story is complex instead of homespun, I shall have to focus until the plot unravels. It is about a Roman returning from his travels having subdued the Goths and captured their queen. The events are not real, the characters umpteen. With a cast so large, the play could be knotty and if that is the case it would drive me potty. Some people think of me as a pain in the neck. If you're undecided you can take a rain check but you would be ignoring the Bard's first tragedy. Perhaps you're more suited to a lighter comedy. © Luigi Pagano 2013
Archived comments for Q and A
Kat on 07-01-2013
Q and A
Hi Luigi

Happy New Year to you! I see that you're still full of inspiration and wry humour - great stuff. Enjoyed reading.

? a word missed: 'He’s not one (of) my...'

Keep going, my friend!

Kat x

Author's Reply:
And a Happy New Year to you, pussy cat. How are you? Still in Germany? Nice to hear from you.
Thanks for reading and pointing out the omission.

Luigi x

Andrea on 07-01-2013
Q and A
Another amusing history lesson, Luigi πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Thanks Andrea.

Luigi x

franciman on 07-01-2013
Q and A
Luigi, you must be The Bard's PR man. You do it so well.
I love this 'nod and wink' appraisal.
cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Can't help it Jim, I love the guy. His work is awesome. I would have liked to be his PR man if only his talent had rubbed off on me.
Cheers.

Luigi.

Savvi on 07-01-2013
Q and A
I never knew lessons could be so much fun, great stuff. Thanks S.

Author's Reply:
Thanks Savvi, nice to meet you. At school I learned much more when the lesson was interesting and full of fun rather than dry and humourless. I have retained that attitude ever since.

Luigi πŸ™‚

orangedream on 08-01-2013
Q and A
Hi, Luigi. I was hooked from the very first stanza to the last. Wonderful!

Tina xxx

Author's Reply:
Hi Tina, nice to hear from you. It was a bit of a whimsy; glad you liked it. Thanks.

Luigi xxx

Texasgreg on 09-01-2013
Q and A
Aye! Like yer whimsy. Mine are usually flimsy...

Good stuff, Luigi!

Greg πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
On the contrary, dear friend. I find your contributions full of sagacity, never flimsy.

Cheers, Luigi.

Mikeverdi on 09-01-2013
Q and A
Excellent write again, made my day! You do it so effortlessly. Mike

Author's Reply:
Thank you, Mike. You made my day with your nice and encouraging words.

deed on 09-01-2013
Q and A
Hi,

I really liked this poem it is riveting.

Author's Reply:
Thank you kindly, sir. I am much obliged.

niece on 09-01-2013
Q and A
Great stuff, Luigi...:)

Regds,
niece

Author's Reply:
Thanks a lot, Mini, and a Happy New Year to you.

Luigi x


Beware Of Greeks Bearing Gifts (posted on: 24-12-12)
It was Eris who threw the Apple of Discord but...

The most famous conflict ever recorded was started by three deities and a mortal. The latter was a lad they called to judge who of the trio, Athena, Hera or Aphrodite, was the outstanding beauty in Olympus. He told them to disrobe and saw them nude. After examining their limbs for a long spell, Paris, the youth, could not make up his mind. He kept observing the curvaceous goddesses who to encourage him turned to enticements. Noting his keen interest in their anatomies, Aphrodite promised him a beautiful female that had no equal among earthly creatures. She won the contest of course but the verdict put the proverbial cat among the pigeons for Helen, the prize, was wife to Menelaus, King of Sparta and brother of Agamemnon. It is not clear whether she was abducted by the lover boy or whether she consented to the consummation of their passion. That her face launched a thousand ships may be a bit of an exaggeration, yet a war that lasted ten long years was the result of her elopement with the prince of Troy. Some gods were neutral, others interfered taking sides in this bloody confrontation. To know what happened next I read Homer and learnt of all the intrigues that ensued; of why Agamemnon and Achilles fell out, of the latter despair at Patroclus's death, of Hector's, the son of King Priam, demise and the destruction of Ilium, prophesised by Cassandra whose words fell on deaf ears as Apollo, her rejected suitor, made a curse which meant that she'd never be believed. The eventual supremacy of the Achaeans came thanks to a cunningly devised plan: a wooden horse concealing a group of men was left outside the citadel for the Trojans who naively took it inside the city walls thus giving the opportunity to the enemy of opening the gates for the invasion. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Beware Of Greeks Bearing Gifts
Corin on 24-12-2012
Beware Of Greeks Bearing Gifts
Me Ol' Strife

Naw I 'ear tell of an ancien' story
Ov a little slapper 'oose farver raped 'er mum
Mind her muvver must've been quite hoary
Cos it wos a swan that made her cum.

'Er farver said to Leda call 'er 'Elen
An' remember, she's the dorter of ole Zeus
I promise I'll wotch owt fer 'er from eaven
'An doan ler 'er go running aroun' loose.

Well Leda married 'Ellen orf to Sparta,
To some greasy Greek who claimed to be the king
But he wern't the sort of bloke she was arter
An' that was wot started the 'ole fing.

Aphrodite and Zeus's ole strife 'Era
'Ad a barney as women orften do
One said 'er skin wos pala and much clearer
The uvver one said yours looks like dog poo!

Zeus wos sick of 'avin' his ears battered,
'E told 'em bofe to get a referee
No one else fort that it mattered
Til Paris, Prince of Troy, did agree

Paris fell in luv with Aphrodite
But took Sparta's 'Elen as second best,
'Elen's husband, he was very mighty,
King of Sparta and leader of the rest

Of all the Kings of all the City states,
So when Paris did off with his godly wife
He launched a thousand ships armed by his mates
No wonder they call women trouble and strife.

Bootiful 'Elen of Troy we call 'er naw,
But in the end they took 'er back to Greece,
Yer couldn' see it lasting long somehaw
That woman wos just a cocatrice.

Author's Reply:
Very droll, Corin, albeit with a slight departure from the Homeric text. The old man didn't say that Paris fell in love with Aphrodite; he may have fancied her (and the other two for that matter) as he spent an inordinate amount of time ogling but it was the thought of his reward that swayed his decision. As there was little to choose between the three goddesses, Helen would have been fourth best and even fifth best if we consider that he had already chosen Oenone as his wife.
All this assuming that we take those myths for granted, of course. Thanks very much for the humourous riposte.

stormwolf on 03-01-2013
Beware Of Greeks Bearing Gifts
Hi Luigi
I don't know how I managed to miss this one....or why it has so few comments.
It is packed with information and very fascinating.
Well done and you always find something different to write about.
Alison x

Author's Reply:
Hi Alison, given the increased volume of entries some pieces are easily missed. I have difficulty in keeping up with the pace, especially as I have been away over the Christmas period. Glad though that you managed to catch up with this one.

Luigi x


Santa On The Tiles (posted on: 21-12-12)
Christmas spirits and double vision.

I had drunk a few sherries and eaten two or three pies; perhaps I was inebriated but could not believe my eyes. There was a rotund figure going into 'The King's Head', while outside the tavern there were elves with a sled. I heard laughter in the inn and the publican's banter. I imagine that he welcomed the unexpected call from Santa. The optics worked overtime until the farewell toast when Nicholas left the pub waved by a cheerful host. The deer chewed carrots in the intervening silence while Santa paid a visit to the nearest off-licence. I'd seen Father Christmas slowly getting drunk and wondered if he regretted the depth to which he'd sunk. I realised that I was wrong and maybe seeing double, as Santa soon took off on his deer-driven sledge and thoroughly sober as he'd taken the pledge. In the meantime emerged from the off-licence shop a burglar dressed in red handcuffed to a cop. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Santa On The Tiles
Corin on 21-12-2012
Santa On The Tiles
LOL - very funny,a well concealed finale, caught me right out:-)

Dave

Author's Reply:
Cheers Dave. It was the traditional fare awaiting Santa Claus - sherry and mince pies - that gave me the idea for this festive rhyme. Pleased you found it amusing, thank you.

Andrea on 21-12-2012
Santa On The Tiles
Tee hee - less acid and a visit to Specsavers seems to be in order πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
That would be the sensible thing to do, but I have never been that way inclined.

Luigi x

stormwolf on 21-12-2012
Santa On The Tiles
Very good Luigi.

So glad to know he was not one of these bad drunk Santas. πŸ˜‰

http://gothamist.com/2012/12/16/watch_the_drunk_santacon_video_roun.php



Alison x

oops forgot to rate 9

Author's Reply:
My Santa is well behaved and would not do anything improper. Glad that you are glad. Thanks and Merry Christmas.

Luigi x

franciman on 21-12-2012
Santa On The Tiles
Hi Luigi,
The broad sweep and rich character of a Dickens novel. I loved this; left a warm glow.
God Rest Ye Merry,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Jim, we know that even Scrooge, the typical Dickensian miser, mellowed at Christmas time. It is the Saint Nicklaus' effect. He even influenced the production of this ditty. I thank you for your comment and wish you a Merry Xmas.

Luigi

cooky on 21-12-2012
Santa On The Tiles
A very festive write. I like this

Author's Reply:
Cooky, you are welcome. Enjoy the forthcoming festivities.

Luigi

ValDohren on 21-12-2012
Santa On The Tiles
Take more water with it Luigi!! Hahaha. Very amusing. First line, should it not read 'I had drunk a few .. ' rather than 'drank.' Perhaps 'downed' if you want to avoid being drunk again !!!

Val πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
You are quite right, Val. I should have taken Andrea's advice and gone to Specsaver. Many thanks for pointing out the error. I'll never understand the English language: drink, drank, drunk...I'll just drink and be merry.
Glad tidings to you
Luigi πŸ™‚

Savvi on 22-12-2012
Santa On The Tiles
Ho Ho Ho, great title and poem loved the twist at the end.Thanks S.

Author's Reply:
Thanks to you, Savvi, for reading and commenting.

Best, Luigi

Bozzz on 22-12-2012
Santa On The Tiles
Careless drinking the charge? Good one Luigi.... David

Author's Reply:
I wouldn't be surprised. Thanks for the comment David.

Luigi πŸ™‚

butters on 22-12-2012
Santa On The Tiles
did it make the N do a double-take? this brought an xmas smile to me face, indeedy πŸ˜€

Author's Reply:
No, he didn't realise what was happening and went on with his business as usual. It gladdens me that I can make people smile. Enjoy the festivities.

Luigi x

Texasgreg on 29-12-2012
Santa On The Tiles
Aye! Reminded me of a little Santa joke...
Why doesn't Santa have any children?
He has popcorn balls and only comes once a year.
Yes, I spelled "nicely" πŸ˜‰

Funny 'un!

Greg πŸ™‚

Photobucket.

Author's Reply:
Sorry for the late reply, Greg, I have been away over the Christmas period and have just returned in time to read your funny Santa joke.
Cheers.

Luigi πŸ™‚


After Columbine (posted on: 17-12-12)
The Connecticut school shooting.

It takes a madman with weapons no time at all to wreak havoc and mayhem; to traumatise young children and shoot them. What motivates these sick minds to commit such wanton acts and who's to blame? As well as economics, by giving them the right to bear arms, it is the Constitution, stupid. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for After Columbine
cooky on 17-12-2012
After Columbine
Amend the Constitution to fit the times. I fear America cannot change.

Author's Reply:
Easier said than done, cooky. The gun lobby is already up in arms (no pun intended) at the mention of any restriction.
Thanks for the comment.

Corin on 17-12-2012
After Columbine
Madness must be infectious and all of America is now deranged.

Dave

Author's Reply:
There are on average 20 mass killings every year in the U.S. but according to American claims, weapons (around 300 million in circulation) are not responsible for massacres like this. The finger is pointed instead at mental health issues; once they are resolved everyone will be safe and sound. The words cuckoo and land come to mind.

ValDohren on 18-12-2012
After Columbine
Mad or bad ? I go for bad - these people know what they are doing.

Val

Author's Reply:
Unbelievably so, Val, but they won't admit it. Thanks for the comment and the rating.

Best, Luigi

Andrea on 18-12-2012
After Columbine
It's all very well having the right to bear arms, but who needs assault rifles? Topical and stark, Luigi.

Author's Reply:
Exactly my view, Andrea. Not only that but who needs five or six guns for one's own protection? And protection from whom? Anyway, the latest tragedy seems to have stirred the conscience of some of the NRA's members. Let's hope that something positive will be done.

Luigi x

RoyBateman on 19-12-2012
After Columbine
A timely one, Luigi - I noticed the gun death figures on some recent report: 3.2 per 100,000 in the US (I assume that's per year), but 1.6 in Canada, with presumably fairly similar social conditions. And, it's 0.1 in the UK. Are we so much more saintly than the US? After all, the founding fathers were all English and so were most of the first settlers. What happened?
And, I fear that if assault rifles (Ye Gods, who NEEDS one?) are banned, then you can do much the same damage with a handgun. The recent attacker had both, I note. And, from the bits that I've seen on TV, it seems obvious to me that the current crop of ultraviolent video games, with points for shooting people, must bear some responsibility for desensitising impressionable youngsters. I wish I had an answer, but I reckon that nobody does - unfortunately. Another Christmas tragedy!

Author's Reply:
Roy, I have given up trying to understand people's mentality and attitudes. What in our country is considered OTT behaviour is in other parts of the world thought of as ordinary. It is their culture, we are told. It is obvious that the ownership and collection of guns is part and parcel of the American culture and the lethal potential of those weapons is ignored or denied. The availability of arms, the violence exhibited in video games and the bigotry and fanaticism of some religious and political extremists is a potent mix that can conflagrate at any moment. One would be entitled to ask why a so called democratic and free country does not use common sense. But I wouldn't expect a coherent answer.

stormwolf on 19-12-2012
After Columbine
I have cried every day as a mother and grandmother...

However, I stand behind the 2nd amendment for the people will need to bear arms in the coming (manufactured) collapse of the momentary system.
Obama's crocodile tears turned my stomach, considering his drone attacks which break and tear children's bodies in other lands.
He make me physically sick with his totally sickening NWO mind set.

and those who cannot open their minds to understand the slaughter of the children WORLDWIDE???

sorry Luigi

guess it's too much for me to stand.

Alison x



Author's Reply:
Thanks Alison. Your concern for humanity has been noted.

amman on 20-12-2012
After Columbine
Sickening. The starkness of your words matches the senseless brutality of the act. Suffer the little children. It made me sick to read accounts of that horrific crime.
Regards.

Author's Reply:
I echo your sentiments Tony, a truly horrifying act.

Best, Luigi

P.S. Enjoy your break.

Texasgreg on 29-12-2012
After Columbine
Aye, Luigi! I can see and appreciate your take, though I have my own. Mere children are leaving their families and flooding America from Mexico where they have strong laws that prohibit citizens from having guns. Only criminals have the guns there. All of mankind has defects of the mind save none. Some are just unable to work these things out. I carry a weapon and sometimes two at all times. Never used them and wish never to...but if given no choice, I'll protect myself and others.

http://www.press.uchicago.edu/Misc/Chicago/493636.html

Greg πŸ™‚

Photobucket.

Author's Reply:
Once again apologies for the tardy response, Greg. You will always have differing opinions on many topics and the gun controversy is no exception. Pros and cons: the twain shall never meet (to paraphrase Rudyard Kipling's words) and as you have seen I am one of those advocating disarmament, a stance with which you disagree but by not owning any guns I am not a threat to you or anyone else and if everyone followed suit there would be no need to look over one's shoulder for a potential attack. Until then we have to agree to disagree.

Luigi πŸ™‚


Dynasties (posted on: 14-12-12)
My entry to the weekly challenge in the Forum. The prompt was GAUNTLET.

Did John of Gaunt let young Richard, the Plantagenet king, get out of control, while he was the youth's de facto regent, or did he act according to royal protocol by keeping a tight rein on the kid's reign? He exercised great influence on the boy but made unwise decisions on taxation which led revolting peasants to destroy his beloved Savoy Palace near the Strand. The teenaged monarch displayed guile in trying to smother Wat Tyler's rebellion; he promised reforms but in the meanwhile the insurrection lost its impetus and failed. After John's demise, Henry Bolingbroke, his son and heir, came back from France, threw down the gauntlet to King Richard and claimed the throne and his inheritance. Richard surrendered to Henry in Flintshire, was sent to Pontefract Castle in the North where he supposedly* died. His reign over, the new sovereign was Henry the Fourth. © Luigi Pagano 2012 *Rumours persisted that he was still alive and living in Scotland.
Archived comments for Dynasties
barenib on 14-12-2012
Dynasties
Luigi, are you trying to get on the national curriculum πŸ™‚ An entertaining and educative piece - John.

Author's Reply:
Aye John, trying to get accepted by a free school. It was a Forum challenge and I could not resist the pun.
No intention of being educational. Cheers.

Best, Luigi.

amman on 15-12-2012
Dynasties
Nice one Luigi. Not surprised that you won the challenge with this. Good pun too.
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
Thanks Tony. Not as obscure as my musical clues I hope.
Cheers.

Andrea on 15-12-2012
Dynasties
Blimey, you're a walking encyclopaedia, Luigi!

Author's Reply:
I wish I was Andrea. A bit of history and a pinch of Shakespeare: it all rubs off.

Luigi x

franciman on 15-12-2012
Dynasties
Oh for a muse of fire, the provenance of that gilded scribe Luigi!
This would have won the challenge in a much bigger field.
Such a well conceived verse.
cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
A gentleman as ever, Jim. Merci beaucoup for your kind words and generous rating.


Persone Basse (Short People) (posted on: 10-12-12)
Does size matter?

The human anatomy is determined at birth, it could be a slim waist or else a larger girth with which one grows, he (or she) may be tall or, conversely, short. If your stature is small is it a serious handicap and can it be overcome? Nothing can be done if you're like Tom Thumb but many famous people although miniscule did not find it difficult to conquer or to rule. Napoleon, five-foot-six, the same as Joseph Stalin; Ben-Gurion only five feet, five inches less than Tolkien. Also risen to prominence was Gandhi, five-foot-three, so height is not a problem but you may not agree. Sizes don't really matter, don't let it bother you, even if inconvenienced you have to muddle through. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Persone Basse (Short People)
Texasgreg on 11-12-2012
Persone Basse (Short People)
Aye! As well pointed out, only the size of your determination reveals your destination. I prefer a large heart and small ego.

Greg πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Very wise, Greg. Your kind words reveal your big heart. Thanks.

amman on 11-12-2012
Persone Basse (Short People)
Very philosophical Luigi. We've all got the same working parts (depending on gender, pf course).

Good examples of short people in History.

Cheers.



Author's Reply:
Hi Tony. It has been pointed out to me that those I described as short people perhaps were of average height in their time. It could be but I was judging them by present day's standards.
Thanks for reading and commenting.
Cheers.

Luigi


Not Guilty M'lud (posted on: 07-12-12)
My entry to the Forum weekly challenge. The prompt was HEINOUS.

I was accused of a heinous crime and told I'd have to serve my time. I shouted my innocence to the wind and waited for the judge to rescind the verdict that was certainly wrong. It was said the evidence was strong as witnesses had sworn they had seen a man acting suspiciously at the scene who looked the spitting image of me; that was the reason I lost my liberty. Because I did not have a valid alibi I had to wave my freedom goodbye. The thought that I'd be behind bars and not being able to race fast cars for a long time, filled me with dread; it was tantamount to being dead. My barrister argued a point of law; that's when they found a serious flaw: it looks as if the specialist didn't latch on the fact that there was no match between DNA found on the deceased and my genetic code. I was so pleased that I ran back to my mistress' s bed. Her timely testimony could have led to all the charges against me dismissed if she'd told that we hugged and kissed at the time that the crime took place but to be fair I know she couldn't face the reaction of the cuckolded spouse who, luckily, is absent from the house. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Not Guilty M'lud
Texasgreg on 07-12-2012
Not Guilty Mlud
Why you devil, you...first the maid out in the open as you didn't have a car...(those who don't get this will have to view Luigi's last sub.).

Lol-Good 'un, Mate!

Greg πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
I know, I know Greg, but what can I do? I can't help it. Women will be my downfall.

Luigi:-)

amman on 07-12-2012
Not Guilty Mlud
Nice one Luigi. As entertaining, well constructed and rhymed as ever. Did you show this one to the missus or did cowardice ( I mean discretion) win out ?
Cheers from your heinous rival.

Author's Reply:
Hi Tony. Discretion is the better part of valour. (Good old Will; he can always be relied on for a quote.)
As I only show to the missus pieces that have been nibbed there isn't much chance that she'll see this one.
Cheers.

Andrea on 08-12-2012
Not Guilty Mlud
Prisons are full of innocent men, eh Luigi?

Author's Reply:
Yep. All waiting to be rehabilitated, Andrea.

Luigi x

stormwolf on 09-12-2012
Not Guilty Mlud
Well done..
Alison x

Author's Reply:
Ta muchly.

Luigi x


The Poison-Pen Letter (posted on: 03-12-12)
My entry to last Wednesday Prose/Poetry challenge in the Forum.

It arrived in the post this morning. I knew the letter was anonymous although I hadn't had any warning. The words within were venomous, the invectives it expressed vitriolic. I could not think of anyone so sad who would sent a missive so diabolic: they were either dysfunctional or mad. He or she wasn't so much talking as ranting with a badly written page. It amounted literally to a stalking, with a poison pen spewing its rage. The accusations in it made no sense, I had never seen the girl in question and I hadn't committed any offence but that was the writer's suggestion. That I should have seduced this maid in the back seat of my car in a lay-by is a ludicrous statement, I am afraid: I don't drive or have a car - so it's a lie. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for The Poison-Pen Letter
Mikeverdi on 03-12-2012
The Poison-Pen Letter
I wonder what would have upset you the most, the contents of the letter or the bad writing. Ha Ha! Great write Luigi. Mike

Author's Reply:
Good question Mike. I suppose I would have noticed the bad writing after recovering from the shock and that would have depressed me even more.
Cheers.

Luigi

peg on 03-12-2012
The Poison-Pen Letter
Oh, heck. Never had one, but you made the horror of one so real ! Thank goodness you don't have a car !...Maggie

Author's Reply:
I never received one either Maggie. The poem is just a product of my warped imagination. One thing is true, though, I don't drive.
Best,

Luigi x

franciman on 04-12-2012
The Poison-Pen Letter
He Luigi,
I really enjoyed this when first read it on the challenge. There's even more to enjoy when I re-read it.
small grammatical error maybe:-
He or she wasn’t so much as talking
as ranting with a badly written page. (No need for first 'as'?)
cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Not maybe, Jim, most definitely a grammatical error. Must do better. Back to school for me.
Many thanks.

Luigi

butters on 04-12-2012
The Poison-Pen Letter
makes one wonder how many people get this kind of bombshell dropped through their doors and how it must affect their lives.

very glad to hear it's not based on personal experience, Luigi!

Author's Reply:
It must be a horrible experience I imagine and I wonder if anybody would laugh it off as a prank. As it is I can only speculate.

Luigi x

amman on 05-12-2012
The Poison-Pen Letter
Like this Luigi. Great denouement at the end. Surprised it didn't win but there were some good entries.
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
Well Tony, the fun is in the taking part. You are right, the challenge attracts entries of very good standard every week and they can't all be chosen.

Texasgreg on 06-12-2012
The Poison-Pen Letter
I'd say the fact that you don't have a car is most likely why you were seen. Good argument for owning a car...

Greg πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Are you kidding Greg? To have done that deed in the open air would have been madness: it is cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey at this time of the year in these parts. If any maid wants to be seduced it has to be in the comfort of my home.

Luigi πŸ™‚

jay12 on 06-12-2012
The Poison-Pen Letter
Nice poem! Surely this kind of thing doesn't go on though, sounds all very unkind and unnerving. Anonymous threats and allegations. Very unfair IMO.

Jay

Author's Reply:
I wouldn't be too sure, James, there are all sorts of weird things going on in this crazy world. Anonymous threats and allegations? It's not cricket, I dare say.

Andrea on 06-12-2012
The Poison-Pen Letter
Nasty piece of work, Luigi (her, not you. Your work is excellent!).

Author's Reply:
Good job you qualified the reference to the nasty piece of work, Andrea. I was on the verge of chucking it all in
until I read your kind words. Thanks.

Luigi x


A Man Is Not A Poet Unless... (posted on: 30-11-12)
Poetry and pomposity.

A man is not a poet unless he's sad. His angst must gush from his heart onto a notepad. He has to forget happiness and write only of anguish and distress. He can talk of denial and inhibition but cannot be an author of sunny disposition if he wants to be taken seriously. An artist of distinction deals with misery and despair with equity. That his verses don't sell is neither here nor there. His work may be unread in his lifetime but will certainly be forgotten when he's dead. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for A Man Is Not A Poet Unless...
stormwolf on 30-11-2012
A Man Is Not A Poet Unless...
Oh dear, what a sad reflection
Alison x

Author's Reply:
Sad but true, dear Alison. I wrote this to deflate the ego of those poets that strongly believe that the only 'serious' poetry has to be based on sad and tragic events, i.e. the breakdown of a relationship.
They dismiss any humorous verse as doggerels. I can think of one or two of these characters.

Luigi x

stormwolf on 30-11-2012
A Man Is Not A Poet Unless...
Of I got the message loud and clear Luigi.

Author's Reply:
I never doubted it, Alison. There is nothing cryptic in the message.

Bozzz on 01-12-2012
A Man Is Not A Poet Unless...
But Luigi, I am sure you will agree that misfortune is the basis of all the best comedy. Who said "Tragedy is comedy in disguise - it all depends on your point of view". But of course you are so right - people use poetry for their woes - escape to misery. Message spot on. Bright read .....Bozzz

Author's Reply:
It is true, David, that misfortune can be the basis for comedy. The perfect example is the hilarity derived from seeing someone skidding on a banana skin. Obviously the reaction among onlookers varies from person to person but a a really 'serious' poet would probably describe the incident in woeful tones not only about the injured party's trauma but also the psychological effect on the banana skin.
Cheers.

Luigi

cooky on 01-12-2012
A Man Is Not A Poet Unless...
Very true and needed writing for those who do not realise. I like this.

Author's Reply:
Thanks for the solidarity, cooky, much appreciated.

butters on 01-12-2012
A Man Is Not A Poet Unless...
...a poet by any other name still smells as rough πŸ˜€

some "poets" take themselves and their writing way too seriously. others, not seriously enough.

poems based on only the dark, or only the bright lights, lack the subtleties shadows bring. who wants to write flat, 2-dimensional stuff?

Author's Reply:
Writers in general, not only poets, have their own motivation: some write for themselves, others to share their literary efforts with the readers at large. The motives are many and varied, to spread a message, to become famous, to get rich (difficult) or (*says he cynically*) to show how superior their output is to other poets'. All in all I believe there is an element of vanity in our endeavour but so what?
When it comes to value the merit of a piece it is up to the discriminate reader to decide whether there is enough depth to a particular offering. Some poems can say much more with four lines than one of epic proportions.

Texasgreg on 02-12-2012
A Man Is Not A Poet Unless...
There once was a man from Nantucket
who wrote on a sad note with no luck.

He changed his tune
and was drowning in doubloons.

Found out he was dying
and said "fuck it".

Cool poem, Luigi!

Greg πŸ™‚

Photobucket.

Author's Reply:
And a cool limerick, Greg. I don't seem to be able to write that kind of poetry myself so it is doubly satisfying to read a good one.

Luigi πŸ™‚


The Safe Behind The Picasso (posted on: 26-11-12)
Hard times.

I got myself a strongbox, sturdy and of good make; hidden behind the Picasso which is probably a fake. I could put a fortune in it, bullions, securities, rings, except at this very moment I have none of those things. I only own a modest sum won on a free scratch card which shows that the crisis has hit all of us very hard. I shall have to sell the safe for our own solvency sake, the Picasso will have to go although it's probably fake. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for The Safe Behind The Picasso
butters on 27-11-2012
The Safe Behind The Picasso
this one made me laugh, and it was really all due to L4 V1 and L's 3&4 V4.

it's a very funny thought πŸ˜€

Author's Reply:
It was written with tongue-in-cheek. The idea occurred to me after watching a thriller on TV with the inevitable safe hidden behind a painting and the programme Antiques Roadshow where a box which had been locked for twenty five years was unlocked by a locksmith and found to be empty. The thought of a strongbox containing nothing and a fake Picasso appealed to my sense of humour, hence the poem.

Luigi x

butters on 27-11-2012
The Safe Behind The Picasso
oops, double post - no idea why that happened

Author's Reply:
Don't worry, it must be an echo.

πŸ™‚

chant_z on 28-11-2012
The Safe Behind The Picasso
Witty as would be expected. Nice flow.

Author's Reply:
Nice to hear from you chant_z, your feedback is gladly received.

Texasgreg on 28-11-2012
The Safe Behind The Picasso
What's a fake Picasso without a Rolex knock-off?

LOL- Aye, 'tis a witty piece that declares our sad state of affairs.

Greg πŸ™‚

Photobucket.

Author's Reply:
Wadda ya mean knock-off! It is a genuine Rolex I bought in Hong Kong for $5. Was I overcharged? I am not very good at pricing objets d'art.
As for the economy, we are in the doldrums aren't we?

Saluti, my friend.


Forever Young (posted on: 26-11-12)
It's never too late.

He found a companion by trawling the Internet. They exchanged e-mails and then, finally met. At first he was afraid the venture may be risky. What if she turned out to be playful and frisky? Would she reveal tastes that may be viewed as kinky, seeing that her movements were provoking and slinky? He needn't have worried, there was nothing tawdry about this mature lady whose moniker was Audrey. She discovered that he was a gent of the old school - being forever courteous - and he never lost his cool. People who, in the past, had shown merriment now had to acknowledge a successful experiment. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Forever Young
franciman on 26-11-2012
Forever Young
Hi Luigi,
Thank you, that's very re-assuring!
cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Hi Jim. Well, it is and it isn't. It was alright in the situation I described but there is always the danger of buying a pig in a poke on the Internet. The main point though is to admit that age is not a barrier to romance.
Thanks for commenting.

Best, Luigi

Andrea on 26-11-2012
Forever Young
Awwwww, that's cute. In my day it was the pub, but there ya go, times change *sigh*

Author's Reply:
Times do indeed change, Andrea. The personal contact is obviously more conducive to start the ball rolling, so to speak, and the pub was the perfect venue to meet potential partners. It wasn't by any means foolproof: my friend Carlo, whose experience I described in a poem some time ago, was trying his charm on an attractive lady who turned out to be of Sapphic tendencies. Can't win them all.

Luigi x

stormwolf on 26-11-2012
Forever Young
At first he was afraid
the venture may be risky.
What if she turned out
to be playful and frisky?

Well, then he would have struck gold lol

Alison x

Author's Reply:
Shock, horror Alison! That's the comment I would have expected from Shy, but you are quite righ: that would have been my reaction too. Yet some (older) men prefer a platonic relationship.

Luigi x

PS In the words of Shy, what are you doing this weekend? Would you like to meet up or are you washing your hair?

peg on 26-11-2012
Forever Young
Ah, the dangers of the internet. Life is a risk though, have to take some sometimes..lol. Enjoyed this read, thanks...Maggie

Author's Reply:
Yes Maggie, everything in life is risky and if we don't take the plunge we'll never know what we have missed.
Who knows, we may be lucky and land on our feet.

Luigi x

stormwolf on 26-11-2012
Forever Young
Yet some (older) men prefer a platonic relationship.

Yes, i know...that's why I am looking for someone with a bit of life in 'em πŸ˜‰

You are naughty Luigi!

Author's Reply:
Good on you Alison, that's the spirit.

Luigi x

butters on 26-11-2012
Forever Young
a gentled piece, Luigi - your gentleman made me think of Hercule Poirot aka David Suchet πŸ˜€



it's a nice thought that love and companionship are not only for the kids πŸ˜‰

Author's Reply:
Funnily enough, butters, I have noticed that there is a new series on TV, called 'Last Tango in Halifax' which deals with the topic of an old couple reunited after many years deciding to tie the knot even though their sons and daughters strongly disapprove. This mirrors the young generation's attitude in real life towards older people's sex life. That they are 'past it' seems to be their jaundiced view.
Anyway, I digressed. It only remains for me to thank you for reading and commenting.

Luigi x

Texasgreg on 26-11-2012
Forever Young
Aye! Don't recall the numbers, but a large percentage of people meet on the internet now. I can't though...Y'all take up too much of my time. πŸ˜‰

Good job, Luigi!

Greg πŸ™‚

Photobucket.

Author's Reply:
Greg, I'll keep it short so that you can have a bit more time to explore the Internet. Thanks.
I too find that I can hardly keep up with the increased traffic.

Luigi πŸ™‚

Bozzz on 29-11-2012
Forever Young
Basically the internet is Plato's tool. There's no telling until the pheromones meet. Find a way to fix that over the net and you are in Aphrodite's business. Liked it ..., Bozzz

Author's Reply:
Today, when people refer to "Platonic Love" they are referring to an affectionate relationship without sexual intimacy. This is not what Plato meant when referring to love. The type of love he seems to have admired most was that based on intelligence or virtue, rather than physical attraction.
That of our 'young' couple is perhaps more akin to Aphrodite than Plato.
Cheers.


The Other Cromwell (posted on: 23-11-12)
Thomas Cromwell was executed for treason and heresy on Tower Hill on 28 July 1540. The King later expressed regret at having lost his great minister.

Oliver is the one whom people recall but I shall tell, like Hilary Mantel, the author of the novel ''Wolf Hall'', of the Earl of Essex, Thomas Cromwell; of his rise to power and inevitable fall at the court of king Hal of many wives some of whom soon went to the wall decapitated by an axe sharper than knives. Thomas helped engineer the dissolution of Henry's marriage to Catherine of Aragon and thereby came up with the solution that the King sought to wed Anne Boleyn, who of virtue was clearly not a paragon. She was later accused of grievous sin, to have committed adultery and incest, and that union was ended like the former. We shall chronicle what follows next, see the effect on Cromwell the reformer, discuss the monarch's new paramour, then third consort, who was very pale and of middling stature, Jane Seymour. Her demise caused Thomas's downfall: he persuaded the King to get hitched, although Henry didn't want to play ball, to Anne of Cleves, a German princess. It didn't work out and an annulment ensued. Cromwell lost the King's trust but Anne got a generous settlement. Not so lucky was the ex vicar general, his actions had created a lot of ill will. Convicted of high treason and heresy he was later executed on Tower Hill. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for The Other Cromwell
Texasgreg on 23-11-2012
The Other Cromwell
Aye! Meddling in the β€œaffairs” of another can have unexpected results, eh?



Greg πŸ™‚



Photobucket.

Author's Reply:
It is said that the road to hell is paved with good intentions, Greg, but I believe that his intentions weren't all that good.
Cheers.

Harpie on 23-11-2012
The Other Cromwell
Well, that's what he gets for sticking his nose in... let that be a lesson to him.

One slight niggle, I've always thought of axes as being superior beasts to knives. The fact that they are 'as sharp as knives' implies that they look up to their sharper cousins. Could this be ...sharper than knives?

Enjoyed this, Luigi

Author's Reply:
He didn't get any lasting rewards for his interference and came to a sticky end.
As for the slight niggle, it depends on how sharp the knives are but I followed your suggestion and made an alteration.
Pleased to hear you enjoyed it.

Luigi x

Andrea on 23-11-2012
The Other Cromwell
Nasty piece of work, that Cromwell, by all accounts.

Well done, Luigi, 'Cromwell' left me quite uninspired πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
It must have been in the genes, Andrea, Oliver was a great-great-grandson of Thomas Cromwell's sister, Katherine Cromwell.
I agree, it was a difficult subject to tackle.

Luigi x

franciman on 23-11-2012
The Other Cromwell
Hi Luigi,
Loved your piece on the alternative Cromwell. Ironically, he was also a hero of mine. Like many (Nan Bullen included), his story was distorted and his memory besmirched.
you have an enviable knack of writing great Biopic Poetry.
cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Intrigue and backstabbing have always been part and parcel of politics and none more so than in Henry VIII' s times. Thomas attained prominence at Court and as his influence grew so did the enmity of other courtiers and, as you rightly say, of Nan Bullen. The King much regretted the loss of the great statesman.
Thanks, Jim, for reading, commenting and rating.


Benighted (posted on: 19-11-12)
My entry to last Wednesday's Forum Prose/Poetry challenge.

The name of an industrialist - well liked - is often cited and all who know him insist that he should be knighted. But because he's been sighted, frequently, in the red district he has now become benighted in the eyes of those who are strict. They say he has let them down, that it isn't right for a knight to trawl those parts of the town especially at that hour of night. He replies, ''I would like to stress that I don't go there to shag but to rescue damsels in distress. Can't you see my Gladstone bag? © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Benighted
Texasgreg on 19-11-2012
Benighted
Luigi,

Hehe...you said gladstone bag. Tell me that was on purpose as I have been away and my mind has grown soft.

Greg πŸ™‚

Photobucket.

Author's Reply:
Hello Greg, nice to see you back. Yes I did mention the Gladstone bag on purpose as a reference to William Gladstone, the Victorian Prime Minister whose lifelong obsessions was the "rescuing" of English prostitutes. His activities in that regard made some question his motivations and even his sanity.
Regards.

Luigi πŸ™‚

Andrea on 19-11-2012
Benighted
Yeah, right πŸ™‚ Very naughty. It was a bit of a tough word last week I thought - you coped really well πŸ™‚ Very clever.

Author's Reply:
Agree, the word wasn't easy but we seemed to cope; I thought that your entry was hilarious.
Thanks for the comment and rating.

Luigi x

orangedream on 19-11-2012
Benighted
Good afternoon, Luigi;-)

I must look up the challenge and read the other entries. A great poem, as ever, and a novel way of bringing in 'Gladstone bag' which is assume was the prompt.

Very much enjoyed.

Tina xx

Author's Reply:
Hi Tina, we rarely see you on these pages and nice to hear from you. The prompt was in fact 'benighted' and the Gladstone bag' was put in as a reference to rescuing the damsels in distress.
Glad you enjoyed this. Why don't you enter the current challenge? The prompt is CROMWELL.

Love, Luigi xx

stormwolf on 19-11-2012
Benighted
Good one Luigi!

You know what I think of the establishment lol

Alison x

Author's Reply:
Yeah I know, no sitting on the fence for you.

Luigi xx

Mikeverdi on 19-11-2012
Benighted
just plain clever and so good. Mike

Author's Reply:
Very kind, Mike, thanks.

butters on 19-11-2012
Benighted
liked the gladstone bag reference, for the reason you cited but also because it gave me a little shiver - made me think of a doctor's bag as well, and the rumours about jack the ripper!

Author's Reply:
The prostitutes in those days had much more to fear from Jack the Ripper than Gladstone.
Rumours abounded that the killer was a doctor but it was never proved and Jack's identity remained a mistery.
Thanks for looking in butters.


Marriage (posted on: 12-11-12)
My entry to last Wednesday's challenge in the Forum.

Some call it an honourable institution but others say that it is a misnomer and blokes should be given a diploma if they manage to achieve dissolution. Many divorces will cause destitution. Take for example what happened to Ted, a friend of mine who wanted to get wed not once but twice: he got his retribution. He'd been unwise to entertain matrimony lulled by sweet words, sealed with a kiss, and by the promise of happiness and bliss but it ended in recrimination and acrimony. He's never been so unhappy in all his life: now he must maintain the current mistress - and this is causing him no end of stress - plus the first consort and the second wife. Believes that domestically he is the master and thinks that what he does is for the best. He's planning to build yet another nest knowing full well that it will be a disaster. Everyone has seen the dangers but him, the situation is very serious and not funny; as long as getting divorced costs money it does not do to get married on a whim. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Marriage
ValDohren on 15-11-2012
Marriage
As usual, its the women who get the blame - in my experience, its the men who are the problem !! Stay single is what I say.

Author's Reply:
The way I see it, it's his own fault for making the wrong choice every time. To err (once) is human but to persevere is diabolical, as Confucius said - or if he didn't he should have. I don't blame the women but his excessive testosterone.
I have been married far too long to follow your advice to stay single but thanks for the suggestion.
And thanks also for the comment.

Best, Luigi.

Andrea on 15-11-2012
Marriage
Missed this on here, Luigi - liked it on the forums and like it now. That Ted, eh? What a nightmare...

Author's Reply:
Easy to miss, Andrea, as it was well down the list but glad that you eventually found it. Thanks.

Luigi x


A Heroine Named Malala (posted on: 09-11-12)
A Fib poem. A type of syllabic verse based on the numerical pattern of the Fibonacci Sequence: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21... (Each number is the sum of the preceding two.)

A girl was shot. But for what? What was the reason? Had she committed high treason? Not at all, it had to do with discrimination: She desperately wanted but was viciously denied the right to education. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for A Heroine Named Malala
Harpie on 09-11-2012
A Heroine Named Malala
Great shot at it Luigi, I lurched at this one because I've just been reading about the Fibonacci sequence, apparently it's the scoring system used in a popular card game, too.

Really liked this... but I think you could have pushed yourself to one more level, though two would be pushing it in a single sentence. But if the count was right would it have to be? Really interesting structure, I enjoyed reading .

Author's Reply:
Hiya H. I have heard that the Fibonacci progression has been applied to the games of blackjack and roulette although the sequence wasn't intended for gambling.
I could have expanded the poem but I thought that doing so would have diminished the impact of what I wanted to convey.
It becomes more difficult, and awkward, as the lines are increased but not impossible. In some versions when an optimum number is achieved, the sequence is reversed and the number of syllables reduced accordingly.
This is my only effort at this structure and was done for the Poetry Pentathlon competition on ABCtales.
It was favourably received and gained second spot in heat 4.
Anyway, good to know you enjoyed it.

Luigi x

roger303 on 09-11-2012
A Heroine Named Malala
Very cleverly done Luigi.
I agree that the succinct composition reinforces the impact.
I see you kept that accomplished pen.
You wouldn't have a spare by any chance?
Regards,
Roger

Author's Reply:
I am down to pencils now, roger. If they respond like my accomplished pen did I'd be delighted.
This short seemed to fit the subject well.

Best, Luigi.

Andrea on 10-11-2012
A Heroine Named Malala
Never heard of Fibonacci Sequence, Luigi, and can't grasp it either, but I did like your pome. Brave kid, eh?

Author's Reply:
Fibonacci was an Italian mathematician of the Middle ages much more intelligent than me and his sequence had something to do with the golden ratio. As I am not in his class, don't ask me to explain it. Suffice to say that some clever bod thought to apply the formula to poetry and come up with a new form.
Malala was indeed a brave little girl and I hope that my poem did her deed justice.

Luigi x

peg on 11-11-2012
A Heroine Named Malala
A great form, sympathetically treated with this topical content. Enjoyed...Maggie

Author's Reply:
Very grateful for your comment, Maggie.

Luigi x


Spirits (posted on: 02-11-12)
For the Forum Prose/Poetry Challenge.

I was told that on the night of Halloween there are disembodied ghosts to be seen among the ruins of an Anglo-Saxon church and that's where I went to start my search. I was much eager to record anything odd so I was equipped with camera and tripod. It was dark and the conditions were right, I saw my phantom as it struck midnight. Judging by the body cuirass that he wore he had been a combatant in the Civil War. Nonchalantly he waved at me and smiled and by his friendliness I was beguiled. He gave a gentle hint, with a discreet cough; the shutter clicked but the bulb didn't go off and I didn't get the proof I'd come to seek: the spirit was willing but the flash was weak! © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Spirits
roger303 on 02-11-2012
Spirits
Clever (as always) and funny.
Very good Luigi, IMO.
Loved the last line.
Thanks
Roger

Author's Reply:
Cheers Roger. Glad you enjoyed the piece, thanks for commenting and the generous rating.

butters on 02-11-2012
Spirits
worth reading for the pay off of that last line 😎

Author's Reply:
Thanks for the feedback.

Best, Luigi.

cooky on 02-11-2012
Spirits
lovely set up for the last line. I like this

Author's Reply:
Thanks for your appreciation, cooky. Cheers.

Andrea on 03-11-2012
Spirits
Oh, brilliant last line! Tittering all the way to me vino tinto...

Author's Reply:
I know which spirits are first in your order of priority but I am happy to come second to the vino tinto.

Luigi xx

CVaughan on 03-11-2012
Spirits
Well done again Luigi, I already praised the flesh/flash weak pun as you'll know. Need say no more but pleased to see the approbation echoed so widely by others. Frank

Author's Reply:
Thanks Frank, you are a brick. Cheers.

ValDohren on 03-11-2012
Spirits
Amusing and clever write - very spirited.
Val

Author's Reply:
Thanks Val. Just a piece of fun-write in which I have been indulging more and more of late.

jamalbbd on 03-11-2012
Spirits


Author's Reply:
Much obliged sir for the generous rating.

amman on 03-11-2012
Spirits
Very good Luigi. Bit worried about you flashing in a churchyard tho'.
Amen.

Author's Reply:
Don't worry Tony, it is no longer consecrated and there were no women present.

Harpie on 03-11-2012
Spirits
I really like this one, that last line is fantastic.

Author's Reply:
Good to see that you have taken this in good spirit. Ta.

deepoceanfish2 on 05-11-2012
Spirits
Oh Luigi, This gave me a chuckle! Well done...a fav read here!

Author's Reply:
Adele, where have you been? Welcome back to the site. You have brightened my day by choosing this humourous piece of mine as a favourite. I feel privileged, many thanks.

Luigi x


Public Speaking (posted on: 29-10-12)
My entry to last Wednesday Forum Challenge - CANINE

I am proud of my profession, I am a public speaker. There are many others but they're somewhat weaker. Having given a speech on Australian wines I was invited to talk on the subject of canines. I am always prepared to do the very best so was very punctilious in preparing the text. Whereas in the wine lecture I mentioned a monteith I wondered what I'd say on the topic of teeth. Should I mention incisors and the first bicuspids? But what if in the audience there were a load of kids? Would they know the purpose of teeth that are conical? My instinct told me they'd think of them as comical. My careful preparation was of no consequence and my presentation was met with utter silence. The message was clear, there were no ifs and buts, what they wanted to hear was the history of mutts. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Public Speaking
Andrea on 29-10-2012
Public Speaking
Oh, very droll, Luigi πŸ™‚ And there's you moaning you're always on the bottom of the shuffle, eh?

Author's Reply:
Do I moan? I may have mentioned it once or twice, in passing. Miracles do happen, Andrea, or else I don't know how to explain my pieces being at the top two weeks running. It is a good position to be as it attracts a lot of hits. Hopefully you didn't groan too much reading this.

Luigi x

CVaughan on 29-10-2012
Public Speaking
Choosing the tougher option Luigi as you did, very clever, the only one about teeth, and making such a good job of a high tariff subject. Kudos for it, and funny as ever, it is. Did you notice three of us employed the mutts term coincidentally?











Author's Reply:
I did notice, Frank, the word mutt being repeated in other pieces as well as mine and wondered at the time whether our brains work in synchronicity, almost telepathic but then, on reflection, realised that we all work according to a regular routine and that 'mutt' would automatically be the first to come to mind.
Anyway I am glad you liked the poem and appreciated its construction. Thank you.


Looking After A. and E. (posted on: 29-10-12)
Based on an Inspiration Point 'borrowed' from ABCtales.

Amanda is light brown and Ellen a brunette. The former is a tease, the latter a coquette. To look after them is proving quite a bind, especially when boys are always close behind. They revel in their beauty, compete with each other for admiring glances to the despair of mother. She has promoted me to be her deputy, to reign the girls in, to curb their vanity. But I feel I'm fighting a gradual losing battle because it is quite hard to look after our cattle. The above said specimens are cows from Aberdeen, they are the best beasts that anyone has seen. Now you may understand why my hands are full, with two mammals on heat and a rampant bull. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Looking After A. and E.
Andrea on 29-10-2012
Looking After A. and E.
Silly cows, eh? Yep, read this on The Other Site. Very good you old rampant bull, you πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Yes I know you read it, I saw your comment over there. Rampant bull eh? I think I like you more and more.

Luigi x

Mikeverdi on 29-10-2012
Looking After A. and E.
Truly a love poem with a difference!! lol Mike

Author's Reply:
Whenever there is romance in the air the French have a phrase for it: Cherchez la femme. Whatever the nature of the beast, they try to impress the opposite sex.
Thanks for reading and rating, Mike.

peg on 29-10-2012
Looking After A. and E.
Love it ! You had me going..lol...Maggie

Author's Reply:
Hello Maggie, welcome to the site. Not everything is how it seems at first sight but I gather you saw through my little subterfuge. So glad you liked it, thanks.

butters on 31-10-2012
Looking After A. and E.
a humorous take on a novel poetic topic πŸ™‚

the muse fairy harnesses strange mounts, and flirty beefy heifers on the pull are its hairy choice here!

Author's Reply:
Hello and welcome, butters. You summed up this pretty well, I couldn't have done any better.
Thanks for reading and commenting. πŸ™‚

Bozzz on 01-11-2012
Looking After A. and E.
I am still trying to envisage what an admiring glance from a cow looks like. I am not a handsome enough guy to experiment on my chances as a bull. Loved it Luigi. David

Author's Reply:
Next time you go near a field notice how all the cows' eyes follow you around. They may be comparing you to a bull but somehow doubt it, David. I think they are curious by nature.
Cheers. πŸ™‚


A Fib By Any Other Name (posted on: 26-10-12)
...is still a fib.

We know that politicians can always tell a fib. And we recognise the lie as insincere and glib. They think voters forget and so they don't desist. Deviations from the truth may suit one's antagonist who tells you that you suffer from an ailment called amnesia or in the case of Mitt Romney of a dose of 'Romnesia'. This was the diagnosis by president Obama and with elections so near it intensifies the drama. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for A Fib By Any Other Name
stormwolf on 26-10-2012
A Fib By Any Other Name
haha don't get me started on politicians and lies, Luigi...
Alison x

ps interesting to see what's going to happen in the USA elections. There IS no lesser of two evils with that pair IMHO



Author's Reply:
I know pretty well what you think of politicians and lies, Alison, and by and large you are pretty shrewd in your estimation. I am not really qualified to judge the candidates in the U.S. of A's election but I have a personal view as to which of the two is the lesser evil. It would be interesting to know what our transatlantic authors, Ralph and Greg - and Harry too - reckon.

Luigi x

niece on 26-10-2012
A Fib By Any Other Name
If I were to exchange the names of the US election contenders with some of our own local favourites(?), I'm sure the poem would still make sense...they are the same everywhere as is the average voter...good one, Luigi!!!

Regds,
niece

Author's Reply:
I know exactly what you mean, Mini, and it is such a shame that politicians have transformed us into cynics.
Nice to hear from you.

Best, Luigi

barenib on 26-10-2012
A Fib By Any Other Name
It would be funny if it wasn't so serious! I can't beilieve some of the porkies they come out with these days. Well said Luigi - John.

Author's Reply:
If we don't laugh, John, the alternative is to cry. Would another lot be any different? I doubt it.
Cheers.

Luigi

Bozzz on 26-10-2012
A Fib By Any Other Name
Luigi, here lies pragmatism. You see a monkey in a tree. You walk round the tree. The monkey also moves around the tree and keeps facing you. You have walked round the tree, but have you walked round the monkey? Your poem has never a word mis-spoken. Like it. Thanks for sharing.... David

Author's Reply:
A good question David but, as the saying goes, I don't give a monkey.
I thank you nevertheless for the poser and for liking the poem.
Cheers.

Andrea on 26-10-2012
A Fib By Any Other Name
Indeed. I think everyone knows, by now, my opinion of Romney. Mind you, my opinion of Obama isn't much higher πŸ™‚

My dear departed Pater always used to say 'Between the devil and the deep blue sea...'

Author's Reply:
So the Republicans and the Tea Party don't hold any attraction for you? Mitt will be very disappointed.
I see what your Pater meant but it is surely better 'the devil you know'...
Anyway, isn't it surprising that, with a couple of weeks to go to the elections, economic growth in the USA has increased by 2%?

amman on 28-10-2012
A Fib By Any Other Name
Nice one Luigi. Topical. Can't top Bozzz' comment; very apt. We have plenty of arse scratching Monkeys (oops, I mean politicians) here in NZ if you run short.
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
It always heartens me to see that we can still make fun of our politicians. I am still an optimist despite stormwolf's dire warnings.
Cheers, amman.

Mikeverdi on 29-10-2012
A Fib By Any Other Name
sorry to be so long in commenting, I will add my 'love it' to the list of superlatives you have received so far. Mike

Author's Reply:
And I shall add your name to the people I have thanked profusely, Mike.
Cheers.


Life Of A Sybarite (posted on: 19-10-12)
My entry to this week's Forum Prose/Poetry challenge.

As I was born in Sybaris I am called a Sybarite. I have never been tight, I don't approve of avarice. I admit that I am a toff and live a life of luxury but don't resort to usury and am comfortably off. I am rather relaxed when it comes to my pile, I'll reside in exile so that it won't be taxed. This financial sanctuary will allow me to exist as a devoted hedonist and a true voluptuary. It is easy to measure the value of all this but a woman's kiss is the ultimate pleasure. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Life Of A Sybarite
BATEMAN on 19-10-2012
Life Of A Sybarite
A good poem Luigi, and i'm glad that "a womans kiss is the ultimate pleasure" for you, for me though it has to be a male xxxxx

Author's Reply:
If it kisses that you want, look no further: I am here at your disposal. Sadly they can only be virtual. Pleased that you enjoyed the poem.

Luigi, xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

*stops to regain breath*

Bozzz on 19-10-2012
Life Of A Sybarite
Give me Cyber rather tha Sybar every time - all this kissing nonsense spreads infections.

Cyber loving's in the air.
The word comes first, the love is next.
Distance now is brought to book,
And charm converts to torrid text....etc.


Author's Reply:
Chacun Γ  son goΓ»t, as the French would say, David. I'll risk the infections.
Torrid text? "Honi soit qui mal y pense" (to continue the French theme). You'll find a lot of banter in people's exchanges on this site, all given and taken in good humour.

Andrea on 20-10-2012
Life Of A Sybarite
Sometimes you have to pay for that too, Luigi - tho' Not vous, I bet!

I'll risk the infections, too πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Not that I know of, Andrea. I have so far (with the stress on so far) found that the best things are free. I had an inkling that you'd be prepared to take a calculated risk.

Luigi x

RoyBateman on 21-10-2012
Life Of A Sybarite
I'm glad that you're relaxed about your pile, Luigi - that ointment gets a bit messy. Surprising, but very effective, rhyming scheme - added to the barbed humour considerablty, I thought!


Author's Reply:
Hi Roy. Paradoxically, my pile smoothed the way more effectively than any ointment. Pleased and grateful whenever my work gets your seal of approval. Ta.


Hot & Cold (posted on: 12-10-12)
Having set the theme, I could not take part in the prose and poetry challenge in the Forum but I thought that I would try it anyway and here it is.

He denied that he was concupiscent but he had a string of concubines. His demeanour appeared innocent yet his exploits made the headlines. He decided when he met Sherazade that he would supplement his harem. He'd spotted her on the promenade and she seemed the girl of his dream. But at night she would play a charade as she yakked until he went to sleep. Her come-hither look was just a faηade and the frustrated man was seen to weep. He was desperate for her to be the one who took care of his hyperactive libido; he believed that he would have won if they had passionate sex at the lido. But thoughts of victory were premature, he encountered Sherazade's reticence and the other wives rejected his overture so he had to forget his concupiscence. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Hot & Cold
Bozzz on 12-10-2012
Hot & Cold
Hi Luigi,
Your hero's concupiscent urges are nearer the mark than most - proximity mainly favours the brave, but not always. My condolences. For him to not even get as far as coitus interuptus - tough on the libido and devastating for the testicles. Enjoyed the poem very much David.


Author's Reply:
Hi David. How frustrating to be so near and yet so far. Mind you, if he hadn't thought of trying pastures new he could have relied on the other concubines' goodwill.
Cheers.

BATEMAN on 12-10-2012
Hot & Cold
A very erotic poem Luigi, shame he encountered sherazade's reticene, an interuption like that could cause his testicles to burst lol xxxx

Author's Reply:
Indeed. How inconsiderate of her not to minister to his needs. Could have left a lasting damage.

Best, Luigi x

franciman on 12-10-2012
Hot & Cold
Hi Luigi,
I love the fact that you have written about the only Sultan born in Scotland - Mustapher Thenou. Great read.
cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Scottish or not Jim, he had to change his name to Mustapha Ashower. Poor guy, he has my sympathy.
Thanks for commenting.

Luigi

Andrea on 13-10-2012
Hot & Cold
Hahaha, lovely. Can just hear his groans as she yakked πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Yakety-yak. Typical woman, he must have said under his breath.

Thanks, Luigi x

Weefatfella on 13-10-2012
Hot & Cold
Photobucket

Well at least Scheherazade kept the heid and King Shahryar kept it in his troozers.
Thanks for Sharing Luigi.
Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
He did, WWF, but didn't think it was part of the bargain. Silly fellow. Some women can twist us round their little finger.

Thanks for reading, Luigi.


CVaughan on 13-10-2012
Hot & Cold
I note your Sherazade is not the classic spelling of the famous character & teller of Arabian Nights Luigi. You have your own plot line makes a fun read and works that dreaded word in well. I forgot to post my little forum effort this time.

Author's Reply:
Yes I know, Frank. There are various spelling of her name and Scheherazade is perhaps the most used.
Scheherazade, Sherazade, Ε eherzada, Persian transliteration Ε ahrzΓ’d or Shahrzād is a legendary Persian queen and the storyteller of One Thousand and One Nights.
You still have Monday to showcase your entry.
Nice to hear from you.


Sweet & Sour (posted on: 08-10-12)
She loved the flowers' scent.

She was young and gamine and loved the flowers' scent; there was a hint of jasmine in the missives that she sent. Perfumed letters. That's how she liked to correspond. Sometimes we had a row but that strengthened our bond. Was she sending a message with that delicate fragrance? Was it to do with marriage and my lack of compliance? I soon found out the reason when a ''Dear John'' ensued. It amounted to treason that she should be so crude. I confronted her of course: her conduct was flagrant and her language coarse. She was no longer fragrant. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Sweet & Sour
Weefatfella on 08-10-2012
Sweet & Sour

Laurel & Hardy: Dancing


Cheeky wee bizzum.
As usual Luigi. Excellent piece.
Could see the wee impette, cavorting with her boistress suitors, all wearing Jasmine wreaths.
You were well rid of her. Photobucket
Thanks for sharing.
Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
As you say, good riddance. When things don't work out it is better not to prolong the agony.
Thanks for reding and commenting, Weefatfella.

Mikeverdi on 08-10-2012
Sweet & Sour
I like this a lot, sad to say that you would get a text today and where is the romance in that! Mike

Author's Reply:
Too true, Mike. I would be none the wiser though as my mobile is switched off most of the time.
Cheers.

franciman on 08-10-2012
Sweet & Sour
Hi Luigi,
I agree with Mike. A great write and sad reflection on modern love comms!
cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Cheers Jim. Yes, the quill pen and inkwell have long gone and we have to adjust to all new methods. The only allowance I make to modern communication is a typed letter and even that doesn't smack of romance.
Glad you approve of the poem. Thanks for generous rating.

Luigi

BATEMAN on 08-10-2012
Sweet & Sour
A sad poem in the end, thought it was going to be really romantic when i first started to read it.
Sounds as if you had a lucky excape xxxxx

Author's Reply:
Thanks K.L. for rating and leaving a comment on this poem.
It was intended to be romantic but unfortunately not all relationships have a happy ending and I wanted to reflect reality.
You can relax, it isn't autobiographical: I have a warped imagination.

Luigi xx

Andrea on 08-10-2012
Sweet & Sour
Ah, you can't perfume texts and emails, eh Luigi?

Haven't written a letter for years...

Author's Reply:
So much the pity, Andrea, I'd love to receive a scented email. The only letters I send are the typed ones and only when the situation warrants it, otherwise emails are my main form of communication.

Luigi x

jay12 on 08-10-2012
Sweet & Sour
Nice poem. At least an email is nicer than getting a tweet from Ashley Cole.

Jay.

Author's Reply:
What is it with Twitter and sportsmen? It seems to bring out the worst in them, judging by the twittering of Cole and Pietersen.

Bozzz on 08-10-2012
Sweet & Sour
Luigi, how right you are - scents are no guide - peace leads to war - give me pheromones every time. Liked it a lot, Wanted it to go on longer -ending a bit abrupt . David

Author's Reply:
Hi David, thanks for reading and for letting me have your opinion. Some writers are prolific, others are succinct. My main aim is to put my views across. I don't worry about the length as long as the message is clear and unambiguous.

woodbine on 09-10-2012
Sweet & Sour
A poem with a good story that took me back and made me think. It wouldn't be much use sending me a perfumed letter as I have practically no sense of smell. I don't know where your young lady would buy perfumed writing paper.
John

Author's Reply:
Hello John. Thanks for reading this story of a relationship that started sweetly but then went sour. Luckily it wasn't a personal experience but it could have been judging by the many break-ups we hear about.
Odd as it may seem scented notelets and paper can still be bought at certain outlets or one can perfume the writing paper by dabbing a little scent in one corner of the paper.
I relied on Google for this information.
Best wishes,
Luigi

RoyBateman on 09-10-2012
Sweet & Sour
Yes, what one might call a blast from the past...it's been some time since I got a scented letter, but what a nice thought it is. Something to keep and treasure, though maybe not in this case, obviously! It certainly is a pity that communications have increased in direct proportion to their lack of longevity: as someone wrote recently, how on earth are the historians of the future going to find that all-important background information on anyone with nobody leaving behind any communcication that lasts? Perhaps the literary event of the future will be some geek finally cracking somebody's hard drive, eh? Hardly romantic!
Great write, though, Luigi - brought back a more romantic age, despite that (very realistic) twist at the end.

Author's Reply:
Well Roy, as far as the traditional forms of communication go the writing is on the wall. Perhaps that is a warning to us that if we don't something about preserving the art of communication that's what we shall revert to. It could be that kindles, ipads, ipods and other gadgets might be repositories of history but I shall miss the scent of jasmine.
Cheers.
P.S. Re. realistic end. I have become such a cynic that I try to avoid happy endings in my work.

Capricorn on 15-10-2012
Sweet & Sour
Love the twist at the end, Luigi.

I remember writing letters on scented paper & pretty trimmed paper. Those were the days! I thought I'd never get used to writing on a computer - but now rarely use paper.

Eira x

Author's Reply:
Yes Eira, letter writing is a dying tradition. Emails and text messages have taken over.
Thanks for reading and commenting. Hope you are keeping well.

Luigi x


Referendum (posted on: 05-10-12)
Vox populi. This was my (winning) entry to this week's Forum challenge.

We don't say plebiscite - it has a plebeian root - but it is the right word and that's beyond dispute. We call it referendum; in the plural, referenda. We were expecting one as it was on the agenda. The P.M. did a U turn and said there was no need to have one after all: the EU would not proceed to amend the existing treaty. To us this sounded strange, we know that every time they meet there is a change. And if the masses vote they have to get it right; if the answer is wrong they'll repeat the plebiscite. It happened in Ireland and I believe in France those blessed Eurocrats don't take any chance. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Referendum
Andrea on 05-10-2012
Referendum
Don't get yer knickers in a twist, Luigi. Sometimes they have referendums here and completely ignore the result. My current fave saying is:

If voting made any difference we wouldn't be allowed to do ti -- Mark Twain

Author's Reply:
Mark Twain, a man after my own heart. He knew a thing or two.
We seem to be suffering from the same malaise, Andrea.

Luigi x

CVaughan on 05-10-2012
Referendum
Super Luigi, as I said on the forum, your use of a pleb reference (the insulting ugly version of that word) was the wotsit on your cake, a clever concoction. Well done again. Frank

Author's Reply:
Thanks Frank, the pleb reference was indeed the wotsit on the cake. Worth repeating the reference in this poem.

RoyBateman on 05-10-2012
Referendum
Spot on, Luigi - the way that referenda are instantly repeated if they produce the "wrong" result makes such a mockery of "democracy" that it would be hilarious if it weren't so utterly bleedin' tragic. Mind you, maybe the Scots are worse: apparently, their recent referendum on gay "marriage" produced a 2-1 against vote on a high turnout. Need I say whether that's altered its introduction? Silly me, of course not! Keep chipping away, Luigi - the whole rotten edifice will tumble sometime...all empires do eventually.

Author's Reply:
Empires do tumble, Roy, but the edifices take an awful long time to rot.

franciman on 05-10-2012
Referendum
Hi Luigi,
This really was the pick of the bunch.
cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Many thanks Jim.

amman on 06-10-2012
Referendum
Hey Luigi. See you got stuck at the back of the Q. Found it and duly impressed with your biting satire. Waste of bloody time, referendums that is. Worthy winner indeed.
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
Back of the Q is where you often find me. Don't worry, I know my place. Thanks a lot for your appreciation.

stormwolf on 06-10-2012
Referendum
well done Luigi.
I almost missed you all the way down here;-) but your nib pointed the way!

Alison x

Author's Reply:
Hi Alison, any lower and it would have been last week's entry. The good news is that you found it. Thanks for reading.

ChairmanWow on 07-10-2012
Referendum
Spot on concerning the Eurocrats for sure. It's the same over here. Whatever the elites want they get eventually.

Ralph

Author's Reply:
Eurocrats, bureaucrats, schmuckocrats. They are all the same as you rightly point out, Ralph.

Bozzz on 07-10-2012
Referendum
Wow, loved every line. "Now you see it, now you don't, and my next trick will be: homely chat on BBC ? - or some such.
David (Bozzz)


Author's Reply:
Hi David, glad you enjoyed this. Thanks for reading and commenting.

Cheers, Luigi.


Of Nobs And Plebs (posted on: 28-09-12)
...and snobs.

It was in all the papers and debated on the Web: a Chief Whip was alleged to have used the term pleb. It is said he went to Cambridge and a posh public school but no amount of learning stopped his being a fool. He cursed and offended a man in uniform; his conduct was unbecoming, he deviated from the norm. Some claim that he did that to deride the working class and wouldn't contemplate that he was simply a jackass. There was also the suggestion that he implied he was a lord, and therefore much superior, by the utterance of that word. He rebutted the accusation but was still left to rue the use of that expression which he insisted wasn't true. We must blame the Romans for causing all the fuss: they invented the term plebeians and called their masses thus. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Of Nobs And Plebs
stormwolf on 28-09-2012
Of Nobs And Plebs
Well done Luigi.
That man let the cat out of the bag....and all the king's soldiers and all the king's men
can't put this rotten toffs government together again!

GGGGGGGGGRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR

Alison x

ps great, witty and well written poem as per usual.
i

Author's Reply:
Dear Alison, do I have the feeling that you haven't much sympathy for the present coalition government?
As for myself, I couldn't possibly comment.

Luigi x

PS Thanks for reading and for substantial rating.

Texasgreg on 29-09-2012
Of Nobs And Plebs
Aye! Usual Luigi wit with caveat for future "leaders". Hope they subscribe to UKA! I'd be tempted to salute such uttering the words "Good Lord!”

Greg πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
We never seem to elect the right leaders, Greg. If they subscribed to UKA they'd hear the voice of the people, but I still doubt whether they would take any notice.
Yours in hope,

Luigi

amman on 30-09-2012
Of Nobs And Plebs
Amusing satirical piece Luigi. Always good to take pot shots at nobs and snobs.
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
It doesn't do any harm to take them down a peg or two, Tony, except that their skin is getting thicker by the minute.
Cheers.

Weefatfella on 02-10-2012
Of Nobs And Plebs
Photobucket
They are absolutely amazing. I have had the same problem with Councillors. Trying to influence with stupidity. It's because they are steeped in it all day. From first thing. After the shower they've that face to look at. Then they reveal more of it. That's the first act of stupidity, it sets the tone for the day.Great you highlighted it Luigi.

Communities Secretary Eric Pickles said Mr Mitchell should not lose his job over the use of "inappropriate words".< And so it goes on. Thank you for havin a Giraffe.
Weefatfela.

Author's Reply:
I am afraid that such an attitude is part and parcel of the job. They are meek and mild when they are seeking your vote but once they are elected they presume that their power has no bounds and have to stamp their authority.

Capricorn on 02-10-2012
Of Nobs And Plebs
I have really missed your poetry,Luigi and it's great to read your witty work again. You always find something topical to write about in your own unique way. This one has really made me smile.
Eira x

Author's Reply:
We have had quite a few events that have raised eyebrows recently (see also my piece 'Bare Facts) and it is quite easy to put pen and paper and write some comment.
I try to write something unusual that at the same time can be entertaining. Not for me the romantic and sentimental traditional poetry: many others are much better than me.

Luigi x

PS Nice to see you back.


Kol Nidrei (posted on: 28-09-12)
All our vows.

I heard a beautiful piece the other day; it was broadcast on Classic FM radio and went under the name of Kol Nidrei. Composed for the Jewish congregation of Liverpool, it has two Hebrew melodies and consists of a series of variations . Based on the Jewish service of repentance the first derives from a Yom Kippur chant which exudes a deep, evocative cadence. The poem 'Those that Wept on Babel's stream' by Byron, transmuted into musical notations, is the inspiration for the second theme. With rich cello writing and accompaniment this is Max Bruch's most performed music and without doubt his greatest accomplishment. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Kol Nidrei
Nomenklatura on 28-09-2012
Kol Nidrei
Tov me-od!!!

Author's Reply:
Toda.

Shalom, Luigi

Texasgreg on 29-09-2012
Kol Nidrei
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SL0LqFpaL0A&feature=related

Didn't know of what you speak, so I naturally looked it up. Of course I chose a rendition by Neil Diamond!
Never let down by you in obtaining a new cultural pearl or observation on life.

Good tidings to you, Luigi!

Greg πŸ™‚


















Author's Reply:
Dear Greg, thank you for reading and for taking thetrouble to research what I was talking about. I have to make a correction to the result of your search: the Kol Nidrei I was referring to is the musical composition Op.47 by Max Bruch for cello and orchestra - of which there are many beautiful interpretations by cellist such as Jacqueline Du PrΓ©, Teodora Mitova and others - and not the chant Kol Nidre which is part of the Yom Kippur service, although this is the inspiration for Max Bruch's piece.
Have a listen on YouTube, you'll like it.

Luigi

Texasgreg on 29-09-2012
Kol Nidrei
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u7cNznH0GhI

This it?

Author's Reply:
You got it, Greg, and you found me a performer I didn't know. Thanks.

Andrea on 30-09-2012
Kol Nidrei
Interesting. I had to look it up too, of course πŸ™‚ Here's the WIKI info Kol Nidre

And here's Greg's vid made easy πŸ™‚ Beautiful!



Author's Reply:
You had to look it up? I thought you were the fountain of knowledge on these matters. Many thanks for embedding the video. Very good.

Luigi x

niece on 03-10-2012
Kol Nidrei
Listening to it even as I comment --- nice !!!



It's truly amazing how you pick your subjects and write splendid poems on the same...



Regds,

niece

PS :- and a big thanks to Greg for posting the link...

Author's Reply:
I am so pleased you like it, Mini. I am a music lover, so it didn't take much inspiration to come up with a poem to describe the attraction of the musical work.

Best regards,

Luigi


Bare Facts (posted on: 21-09-12)
A light-hearted view of recent events

When the magazine 'Closer' printed the tit-illating snaps of an unsuspecting poser it aroused a lot of chaps. They wanted to have a peep at a pair of juicy melons but if they took that leap they'd be considered felons. They might feel the power of the thought police, could end up in the Tower, their liberty would cease. It does not make any sense that such an upheaval, caused by a photo lens was described as evil. They're what Nature gave us, high-born or hoi polloi, we shouldn't make a fuss but regard them with joy. They may be big or small but, regardless of size, I am convinced that all deserve a boobie prize. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Bare Facts
roger303 on 21-09-2012
Bare Facts
Exellent Luciano - better than my effort - but I did beat you to the punch!
Best wishes,
Roger.

Author's Reply:
You did indeed beat me to the punch, Roger. I was a bit slow out of the blocks and had to cogitate longer before I came up with this. I think that we both managed to highlight this controversial issue equally well with our individual styles.
Cheers, Luigi.

Texasgreg on 21-09-2012
Bare Facts
Photobucket

Luigi, you just crack me up at times! I owe partial thanks to Tony, (Amman), as well fer the grin on my chin today. Now can ya do beaver? I'd like to see Sunken pop out fer a peek as I'm sure you wouldn't make it too weak.

Greg πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Thanks Greg for the sunny welcome. It has brightened my day. I can do bears but not beavers, not yet anyway, but should the opportunity arise I'd give it a try.
We all would like to see Sunken pop out for a peek but at the moment we can only savour his wit through his blog.

Luigi πŸ™‚

niece on 21-09-2012
Bare Facts
It's an obsession that begins from infancy---I tell you :D...a fun poem, Luigi...

Regds,
niece

Author's Reply:
That's very true, Mini, and the memory lingers on.

Bless, Luigi

Andrea on 21-09-2012
Bare Facts
Hahaha, nice one, Luigi, knew you'd come up (so to speak) with something good πŸ™‚ What a fuss over a pair of knockers, eh? No-one took any photos of me when I used to sunbathe starkers!

*grumbles*

Author's Reply:
Now, why do I always miss good opportunities? I could have taken photos of your assets with great pleasure.
Do you have any Polaroids that would show me what I've missed?

With lust, Luigi x

CVaughan on 21-09-2012
Bare Facts

A pair of subs on this subject, how appropriate. Very fine Luigi, the words, not the subject matter as it were, have not kept that abreast of the nitty gritties.
Def nine from me.

Author's Reply:
Frank, you are too much of a gentleman but not keeping abreast of what the dictionary describes as a source of nourishment is a step too far. Talking of which, did you check those two magazine, 'Closer' and 'Chi', to see whether they were too zealous with their exposure?
Thanks for reading, commenting and rating so generously.

cooky on 21-09-2012
Bare Facts
The anagram of Kate Middleton is Naked tit model so perhaps there is more to this story.

Author's Reply:
Now it all becomes clear: it was that anagram which convinced that photographer that it was in order to uncover the truth.

Weefatfella on 21-09-2012
Bare Facts
Well it must have been some camera tae find any bazookas oan that wee lassie.
They tell me she can't get a bra to fit, so she uses polo mints. Royal warrants of appointment polo's I may add but I guess as long as it's polo, she can't go wrong.
Caused a furore that one Luigi. Thanks for sharing. Weefatfella.

Author's Reply:
Hi Weefatfella. The incident caused a bit of a kerfuffle but it has quietened down now.
I must confess that I took a peep and hope I won't regret my boob.

Best, Luigi

amman on 22-09-2012
Bare Facts
I just knew you wouldn't be able to resist this one Luigi keeping abreast of the news as you do. Like Cooky's comment.
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
I always have my finger on the pulse, Tony, and anywhere else it is allowed. That anagram that Cooky quoted is uncanny, it never crossed my mind.

stormwolf on 22-09-2012
Bare Facts
I see you rose to the challenge Luigi πŸ˜‰
I would not think Kate has much to hide myself.
More like a pair of poached eggs.

Alison x

Author's Reply:
That's where you are wrong Alison. Of ample proportions is how I'd describe the specimens in question.
I have it on good authority (mine).

Luigi x

ChairmanWow on 23-09-2012
Bare Facts
I thank Kate for her pictures giving the news a much needed lightening up. Great humorous inspiration Luigi, comments posted almost as inspired.

Ralph

Author's Reply:
Hi Ralph. Nice to hear from you.
I wasn't sure if Kate's news had reached the States and it looks as it has. It is the kind of topic on which jokes can easily be made up and inspire ribald comments. I couldn't resist to see what the fuss was all about and then write my views on it. I am pleased that people have taken it in the right vein.

Luigi


ValDohren on 25-09-2012
Bare Facts
Oh what a fuss
Over two tits
What about men
And their wobbly bits !!

Amusing write Iconicus.

Author's Reply:
A good question. I think that a previous commentator (niece) hit the nail on the head when she said: "It's an obsession that begins from infancy". Sigmund would probably have attributed it to an Oedipus complex.

Thanks for reading and commenting.


A Topsy-Turvy World (posted on: 17-09-12)
Based on recent events.

It looks as if the world is losing its sanity. There have been riots resulting in fatality. Embassies were attacked with cries of profanity. It all started because of an act of inanity: someone posted a video which had no veracity. Was it meant as a joke or to please his vanity? Let's hope that he's met with the utmost severity. The result of his prank has been utter calamity: it upset certain believers and hurt their sensitivity but the havoc they wreaked bordered on inhumanity. Innocent lives were lost because of animosity, bring the guilty to account for their impetuosity. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for A Topsy-Turvy World
Andrea on 17-09-2012
A Topsy-Turvy World
Indeed. Absolute madness, Luigi. The chaos I mean, not your pome, which is very good, not to mention topical, as you so often are...

Next it'll be Kate's tits I suppose πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Re. Kate's assets, I hadn't planned anything but as you have given me a hint, expect something for Friday.
Thanks for the comment and generous rating.

Luigi x

stormwolf on 17-09-2012
A Topsy-Turvy World
Had to laugh at the Boss's comments....Yes, very topical and depressingly so. Good on you Luigi
Alison x

Author's Reply:
Thanks Alison. I take the Boss's comments very seriously so I got working right away at a suitable doggerel.

Luigi x

niece on 18-09-2012
A Topsy-Turvy World
Luigi, the sad and miserable truth that a few sick people can make the whole society sick...last month a doctored video caused near riots in Mumbai too...you couldn't have said it better, Luigi...good one...!!!

Regds,
niece

Author's Reply:
Yes, Mini, unfortunately there seems to be a lot of upheaval around the world which could be avoided if everyone acted more sensibly but it is like asking for the moon.
Thanks for sharing your concerns.

Regards, Luigi.

amman on 18-09-2012
A Topsy-Turvy World
A very succinct account of the current madness in the middle east. Makes you wonder who's stirring up the mobs tho'. Clever the way you've rhymed every 2nd line with 'ity;. A real wordsmith at work. Like Andrea said, perhaps 'tittie' will feature in your next pome.
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
I bow to popular demand, Tony, and a 'tittie' poem is forthcoming.
Thanks.

Luigi πŸ™‚

Texasgreg on 19-09-2012
A Topsy-Turvy World
Ya know Luigi, I once stirred up a hornet's nest knowing full well what would happen...
I was six.

Photobucket.
Greg πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Ah, now I know who is the cause of all the trouble: a six-year-old Texan brat! Shame on you, Greg!
But you are forgiven.

Luigi πŸ™‚

RoyBateman on 20-09-2012
A Topsy-Turvy World
Yes, very topical: it's true, you know - you get to a certain age and EVERY item on the news makes you want to hurl the cat through the screen. Well, okay, not the cat, but something handy and destructive. I'm not sure whether it's the same damn thing coming round yet again, with politicians professing themselves baffled, or the continuing grip of communal lunacy that annoys so much. I dunno, when I think back to that utterly false optimism of the sixties when we kids knew all the answers - what happened? Nothing - the world just carried on in the same old way, and we were too bloody blinded by our own vision of the "future" to see that civilisation would always take two steps forward, one step back - and often the reverse of that, unfortunately. As with the seemingly relentless march of uncompromising "religious" belief. Bigotry and ignorance used to have a different name, but it was basically similar: how depressing! You hit the nail on the head with this one, Luigi - pity you couldn't have knocked a few of those heads together!

Author's Reply:


A Spinster Of This Parish (posted on: 14-09-12)
My entry to this week's Forum Prose/Poetry challenge. The prompt was SPINSTER.

Her status was 'a spinster of this parish' because she had been left on the shelf. They said it was her fault: cold as a fish, she thought of no one else but herself. Her attitude was grouchy and grumpy and by that every suitor was deterred. It made prospective husbands jumpy but maybe it was what she preferred. Oddly enough she was quite attractive but never made the best of her figure. While all the other women were active beautifying themselves, she'd snigger. What's the point, she would simply ask, burying oneself in lashings of cosmetic and hide one's true self behind a mask; the idea makes me puke, like an emetic. Everyone had got the wrong impression: it was not that she was frigid or unfeeling but, being shy, she concealed her passion and, to some, she seemed unappealing. A few, though, found her to their taste, they courted her and breached her defence; in consequence she was no longer chaste. The experience she gained was immense. It didn't matter to her she wasn't married as long as she could feed from the same dish She did not mind the label that she carried which said she was 'a spinster of this parish'. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for A Spinster Of This Parish
stormwolf on 14-09-2012
A Spinster Of This Parish
I always thought that term sounds like something straight out of a Dicken's novel. It was such a sad plight in bygone days to be left on the shelf.
I feel great sadness for any woman who never gets the chance to know love or passion. No wonder they become almost withered emotionally.

Not like your fine heroine that decides to 'get it while she can!'
Good and sensible sentiments to me! πŸ˜‰
Alison x

Author's Reply:
That term is indeed antiquated and I don't think is in use any longer.
I agree 100% that they are good and sensible sentiments, dear Alison. I hate seeing good stuff going to waste.

Luigi x

Andrea on 14-09-2012
A Spinster Of This Parish
She sounds a lot like me, Luigi πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
I am sure you exercised your prerogatives as I can't imagine you being left on the shelf.

Luigi x

cooky on 14-09-2012
A Spinster Of This Parish
An honest spinster. I like this write a lot

Author's Reply:
Yes, she knew her own mind.
Thanks for reading and commenting.

amman on 14-09-2012
A Spinster Of This Parish
Great write Luigi. You tell a real flesh and blood story with this one, with (to me) a strong, no bullshit character. Also, added a new word to my lexicon, 'emetic'. Thanks.
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
Kind comment, Tony. Thanks. The source of new words is inexhaustible but fascinating.

Texasgreg on 15-09-2012
A Spinster Of This Parish
Aye! I believe it comes from lack of feeling due to having the heart broken by ones they thought were "right" and deserving...but I haven't really proven myself to understand the mind of a woman. πŸ˜‰

Good job Luigi!

Photobucket.
Greg πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Who does understand the mind of a woman, Greg?
It doesn't necessarily follow that a girl remains a spinster because of a 'broken' heart. It could be a deliberate choice.
Didn't women, at one time, burn their bras to spurn male domination?
My particular spinster seems to have had her cake and eaten it.

Luigi πŸ™‚

RoyBateman on 16-09-2012
A Spinster Of This Parish
Ah, not such a cold fish after all, then? A bit of a goer on the quiet? You've got to watch 'em, Luigi, you might just be in luck! Seriously, a nice sly portrait with, again, some neat rhyming (figure/snigger for example) - made me chuckle.

Author's Reply:
Never judge a spinster by her status, Roy. Unmarried she may be but underneath she is (or should I say she has) a dormant volcano waiting to erupt. I have been watching but so far no luck. Nil desperandum!
Cheers.

CVaughan on 16-09-2012
A Spinster Of This Parish

You pictured a credible evocation of a lady qualified by her status suiting the designation of the commissioned term. I had a crack at it as well but missed out on inclusion unfortunately due to US timing clashing with GMT. A very good entry as I thought when I first read this in the forum, no reason to change that opinion Luigi. Super effort. Frank

Author's Reply:
Hi Frank, such a shame that your entry missed the boat but the judge jumped the gun, the deadline should have been GMT.
Your nice comment and rating are very much appreciated.

niece on 17-09-2012
A Spinster Of This Parish
Thankfully things have changed out here...women are more independent, giving their careers precedence...but that is in the cities and bigger towns of course...elsewhere in India it must still be considered wrong to be single at 25+ πŸ™ ... Good one, Luigi...that's quite a character you've created !!!

Regds,
niece

Author's Reply:
Times have indeed changed, Mini, and to remain unmarried, for whatever reason, doesn't carry the stigma like in days gone by. As you say, provincial towns are still behind the times and they will take longer to catch up with modern living.
I am all for women expressing their individuality.

Best, Luigi.


On The Blink (posted on: 03-09-12)
A breakdown in communication.

It shows how reliant I am on technology: as I lost the connection on my wireless PC my mind went blank; I could not write, or think. The cursor and my brain were both on the blink. The Muse was still there, but waiting in vain; to write in longhand went against the grain. It had been a long time since I'd used the pen. It was prior to computers and not easy even then. I suffered withdrawals but naught could be done, I was powerless in more ways than one. Now I have a new router which works very well. Will I get inspiration ? Only time will tell. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for On The Blink
Texasgreg on 03-09-2012
On The Blink
Aye Luigi! Appears ya did at that.

Cheaper to hack the neighbor, hehe...
Photobucket.
Greg πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Alas Greg, with my limited knowledge I can't even hack my own computer!
Thanks for your kind comment.

stormwolf on 03-09-2012
On The Blink
hehe Looks like the inspiration never left. Welcome back! Alison x

Author's Reply:
Old habits, I suppose, dear Alison. Nice of you to welcome me back.

Luigi x

amman on 03-09-2012
On The Blink
Heard your computer got 'lightening' damage. What a bummer.
Your usual witty post containing more than a grain of truth. For sure, we're almost totally reliant on technology in all its many forms.
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
Yes Tony, we got hit but oddly enough the only damage was to the router thus disabling my wireless connection. Now reconnected and keeping fingers crossed.
Cheers.

niece on 03-09-2012
On The Blink
It seems the inspiration has already come...a "power"ful one indeed :D. We do not have power problems as such in the city, but I know there are major issues in smaller Indian towns...and yes, lots of places that have absolutely no power at all πŸ™

Good one, Luigi...you've captured the frustration so well...

Regds,
niece

Author's Reply:
Yes Mini, it was very frustrating being unable to communicate with you all.

Best, Luigi.

cooky on 03-09-2012
On The Blink
To use a pen is a rare thing these days. Without my computer I too would be lost. Not sure if that is a good thing for me.

Author's Reply:
I used to write things on paper until I discovered how convenient a computer is. I now find it much easier to see a piece of writing developing on the monitor and so simple to edit errors which are bound to occur.
Thanks for reading and generous rating.

Nomenklatura on 03-09-2012
On The Blink
No longhand, Luigi? I've always pictured you with a quill! πŸ™‚
You describe an experience common to many very well.
Well done!
Ewan

Author's Reply:
It must have been in my previous life, Ewan.
We often incur the dreaded writers' block but what better excuse than blaming one's lack of inspiration on a technical failure?
Many thanks for your comment.

Andrea on 03-09-2012
On The Blink
Tell me about it, Luigi - not sure I CAN write longhand anymore. Just did a complete re-install and lost all me pics! Technology, eh? Who'd have it?

Author's Reply:
I suppose I could write longhand at a pinch but it wouldn't be as neat as the printed word. I am a complete ignoramus regarding technology. If it fails, so do I.
Keeping fingers crossed that everything keeps in working order.

Luigi x

barenib on 05-09-2012
On The Blink
Hi Luigi, a cautionary tale indeed for our technological times. I should keep my pen hand in practise if I were you, just in case πŸ™‚ John

Author's Reply:
I'll keep your advice in mind, John, and I shall take a refresher course in calligraphy.
Nice to hear from you.

Best, Luigi.


Miranda (posted on: 20-08-12)
Shattered illusions.

Two burly men, in suits, are mentioning Miranda. I envisage her sipping tea, with poise, on the veranda. Her little finger in the air; an affectation, quite quaint. She is the girl of dreams, neither a devil nor a saint but a creature in between. I don't actually know her but on hearing her name I am burning with desire to meet and love this dame. My illusions are shattered by those two men in suits: they say that I am a felon, the object of their pursuit, and 'Miranda' is not a girl but the usual police caution. To an innocent man like me it seems out of proportion. They tell me: either confess and become a true penitent, alternatively you may choose the right to remain silent. The events I have experienced have been perhaps too scary. I'd rather shut my mouth than be a 'singing canary'. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Miranda
Texasgreg on 21-08-2012
Miranda
Aye! It's the booze. I'll remember...Miranda on the veranda = banana, hehe.

Classic!
Photobucket.
Greg πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
A quaint comment, my gun-toting friend, but I think I get the drift. Cheers.

amman on 21-08-2012
Miranda
Perfect title Luigi. That Miranda, she's a bitch ain't she, especially when being quoted by a couple of guys built like brick s.......... How many years did you get? Very enjoyable, as ever.

Author's Reply:
I got off scot-free; I resisted the third degree and told them nothing. No more Miranda for me.
Glad you saw the connection. Thanks for reading and commenting.

niece on 22-08-2012
Miranda
Luigi, I googled and searched Wikipedia so as not to display my ignorance...it seems probably I have made the connection...:) ... a fun poem...enjoyed !!!

Regds,
niece

Author's Reply:
Dear Mini, the Americans would probably make the connection much more easily than us as the name derives from a 1966 a U.S. court case - 'Miranda v. Arizona' - which established the principle that a defendant in police custody has to be advised of the right to remain silent to avoid self-incrimination.
I know that you have found the answer by googling (I often do that) but these few words might help others to understand what I am talking about.
Thanks once again for reading my work.

Kind regards, Luigi.


Humility (posted on: 13-08-12)
...of officials and faithful servants.

''I am ever so humble.'' Those words by Uriah Heep, a Dickensian creation, revealed him as a creep. The character was notable for his cloying humility and has become the epitome of sheer hypocrisy. He was a work of fiction but there are real counterparts, obsequious officials who have refined their arts. How many times you've read that someone is fervent and wants to let you know that he's your 'faithful servant'? Of course he doesn't mean it, I have found, in my experience, that when changes are made he'll say: 'for your convenience'. And yet you have no choice; despite their humbleness their rules are not negotiable: they expect you to say yes. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Humility
niece on 13-08-2012
Humility
Luigi, my husband recently had to deal at a professional level with a long time acquaintance of ours...the chap has always appeared sweet and friendly...but that day a very different aspect of his nature emerged...a very Uriah-Heepish one indeed...David Copperfield is one of my favourite classics...some characters are indeed unforgettable...:)

Good poem, Luigi...enjoyed...

Regds,
niece

Author's Reply:
Hiya niece. Unfortunately there are a lot of two-faced Uriahs in this world no matter where you live and one has to be on the alert to spot the signs.
Charles Dickens was a genius at characterisation and he got this type exactly right. It was possibly based on someone he knew.
Glad you enjoyed this effort. Thanks.

Best, Luigi.

soman on 13-08-2012
Humility
Luigi, fo a moment I was bewildered -- wondering how you had stolen my own reflections about similar types hereabouts. If you ever get to drop down here you will see plenty to write about.

Author's Reply:
I was tempted to say that it was telepathy but it wouldn't be true. The piece was based on the hypocritical behaviour that exist in many walks of life. It is, sad to say, a universal malaise.

Regards, Luigi

RoyBateman on 13-08-2012
Humility
Oh, spot on, Luigi - the more obsequious a letter sounds, the more ruddy hypocritical it turns out to be. It seems that, these days, the gap between saying you'll do something and actually shifting off your fat bum to do it is growing ever wider.
On a different level, we're always being assured that we live in an independent democracy...what, when over 50% of our laws come from Brussels? And our so-called Supreme Court can be over-ruled? How does that work? And - worst of all - when no political party will give us the chance to decide on what's really important to most of us.
I noted recently that the Scottish Parliament held a big public consultation on legalising "gay marriage" - three times as many folk replied as the number who gave their views on devolution! The result? Two-thirds against the idea. The real result? It goes ahead anyway...
Sorry, I'm off the point again, but I find this poem very pertinent. And it does remind me of the way that the famously irascible Duke of Wellington ended a letter to a parliamentary opponent -
"I remain, sir, your obedient servant (Which you know damn well I am not)". That's the way to do it!

Author's Reply:
It is a phenomenon that I easily recognise, Roy. Could it be that the older I get the less tolerant I become?
I don't have much faith in the so called 'consultations'. The public opinion is inevitably dismissed. I am with you in regard to the independent democracy vis a vis the European legislations which ties the hands of the courts of this country. The politicians suffer from this Heep syndrome, promising one thing (remember the referendum on the European treaty?) and doing the opposite. Still, we let them remain our 'obedient servants'
even though obedience is expected from us.
End of moan.

Best, Luigi.

amman on 14-08-2012
Humility
One of Dickens' most memorable characters but as you suggest, too many modern counterparts. Nicely written and rhymed, as ever.
I remain your obsequious and 'umble servant. Amman.

Author's Reply:
I love all Dickens' character and their names but as you say Uriah is memorable. Your humbleness and obsequiousness is noted, Tony, and cynically ignored.
Cheers.

Luigi:-)

Andrea on 14-08-2012
Humility
Quite so. Jobsworths. The bane of humanity πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Judging by the number of directives that we get from Brussels, Euroland must have its fair share of these jobsworths.
Thanks for reading and for the generous rating.

Luigi x

PS Taking a few days off. See you on Monday.

Texasgreg on 15-08-2012
Humility
Lol! Classic Luigi stuff. Busted a couple of stitches reading comment section as well. Aye! Do remember reading Copperfield, but was when the moon was just a babe.
Photobucket.
Greg πŸ™‚





Author's Reply:
Hi Greg, sometimes the comments are better than the piece itself; especially the ones from Sunken (much appreciated).
If you can find the time re-read David Copperfield, it's worth the effort.
Thanks once again for reading my stuff.

sunken on 15-08-2012
Humility
Hello Mr. Ionicus. I'm very ignorant when I comes to the classics. My favourite read has long been the Agos catalogue. Sadly it has yet to be recognised in literary circles. I always get a lot from your poems. They're a joy to read and are often educational. I see a gap in the market and it's Luigi shaped. Only one question, where the fook is the nib? My placards are on full display. Sort it out, nibbers! Nice work, fella.

s
u
n
k
e
n



Author's Reply:
Hello Mr. Sunken. Sorry for the tardy reply but I have been enjoying the sun on the North Sea coast for a few days and had to neglect my correspondence. Don't be deceived by all my talk about classic literature, I am still struggling with the key words in Peter and Jane (Ladybird books) but I'll get there in the end.
Glad to hear that you enjoy my writing. Thanks for that.

barenib on 16-08-2012
Humility
Dive into the well of Dickens and you're sure to come up with a good 'un. And I know those people you speak of so well - a lot of them seem to have jobs in my office! John.

Author's Reply:
My apologies to you too John for my late reply. Those jobsworths are a pain in the proverbial and can be found anywhere, especially in a working environment. There is no escape even in retirement: officialdom reigns supreme.
Thanks for the comment, Luigi.

CVaughan on 16-08-2012
Humility
Spot on social comment Luigi with a sweet reminder of CD's great characterisation in his loathsome Heep. I deffered comment to now as I assumed you'd put it in the comp & today saw you didn't somehow. Frank

Author's Reply:
I am sorry Frank that I could not enter it in the Forum challenge. It so happens that I was going away on that very day so I decided to post it on the preceding Monday. Perhaps I should have put a note to that effect.
Many thanks for your comment.

Luigi

SugarMama34 on 17-08-2012
Humility
I have not read the classics either, but I do like this and it shows how deceiving people can be, even if they are so nice to your face. Fact! Great piece, much enjoyed Luigi.

Lis xx

Author's Reply:
Hello Sugar, thank you very much for letting me know that you liked this piece. Always nice to hear from you.

Luigi xx

stormwolf on 19-08-2012
Humility
Good on you Luigi
"There's no fleas on you" as the saying goes. πŸ˜‰
Alison x

Author's Reply:
And no flies either, dear Alison.
Thanks for reading and rating.

Luigi x


I Am Not Superstitious (posted on: 06-08-12)
but...

I am not superstitious, even though I touch wood, I would uncross my fingers if I possibly could but they are stubbornly stuck. I pick a quatrefoil, not for bringing me luck - I'd be daft to have faith in such a palaver - but because I am a serious nature lover. Some say it's a bad omen when a black cat chooses to cross your path but I don't think that, though as a rule I give one a wide berth; (I dislike all felines who inhabit the earth.) You may have seen me side-stepping a crack yet I'm not sure it is true that I'll damage my back. There are other signs like breaking a mirror on Friday the 13th that I view with horror, not for reasons of fortune but for replacement cost and sentimental value of the object I have lost. I could go on and talk of ladders and spilled salt with reasoned arguments which no one could fault. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for I Am Not Superstitious
Corin on 06-08-2012
I Am Not Superstitious
Well there is certainly good luck and bad luck but it is all in the scissors of the Fates!

Author's Reply:
It may be true, David, but I am with Shakespeare on this: "The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our
stars, but in ourselves".
Thanks for reading and commenting.

niece on 06-08-2012
I Am Not Superstitious
I hail from a town where people are highly superstitious...every little creature (lizards, birds, cats, dogs, et al) and their movements have the capability to alter your luck either this way or that...fortunately no one has the time for all this in Mumbai... It's difficult not to fall into the trap when you live amidst such beliefs all the time...

A very nice one, Luigi...enjoyed!!!

Regds,
niece

Regds,
niece

Author's Reply:
Hello niece, I can't think of any country in which superstition doesn't exist. I knew an Asian couple who were engaged for ten years before their parents said it was the propitious time to get married.
Here the newspapers have a column with daily horoscopes which some people take very seriously. As if the astrological sign could determine the fate of million of citizens.
Thanks for the comment.

Best, Luigi

Andrea on 06-08-2012
I Am Not Superstitious
I agree with Julius (I assume it was Julius?). Oh! I see it's Cassius (well, I agree with him too).

Can't say I'm superstitious at all, really. Don't even cross me fingers when walking under ladders - not that I walk under ladders that often, you understand.

Well, will stop waffling now...nice pome, Luigi πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Hi Andrea, I apologise for the late reply but blame it on the Olympics which forced me to be glued to the TV.
I even managed (i.e. wasted) a couple of minutes watching some horses doing ballet. Not my thing.
Anyway, back to reality. I am always aware of ladders, especially if they are on shapely stockinged legs. But that is another matter. Thanks for your lovely waffle.

Luigi x

Texasgreg on 07-08-2012
I Am Not Superstitious
Don't forget the properly hung horseshoe...
Photobucket
Yikes!

Funny 'un...

Greg πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
How could I forget, Greg. I stay away from horseshoes whether hung properly or not. They could give one a nasty bump if falling on one's head. Fingers crossed it never happens.
Cheers.

Luigi

sunken on 08-08-2012
I Am Not Superstitious
I am typing this with crossed fingers, Ionicus. Thankfully auto correct has thus far aided my 'cooment'. Isn't technology wonderful? I hear nasa have put a rover on the moon. Personally I'd have put a Mondeo up there. Rovers are are bit passΓ© now I feel. I hope this 'comment' finds you well and studious. Studious in a writing way. Your poems are a joy to read. I love the way you made lover rhyme with palaver. You do this a lot and it always makes me smile. You are a cheeky Munky and no mistake to be sure. Nice work, fella. Can I uncross my flingers now?

s
u
n
k
e
n

left a bit. up a bit. down a bit. oh sod it. im going home.

Author's Reply:
Good to hear that my rhymes make you smile - some people only groan. I wouldn't like to see you cross, crossed fingers are more than enough. You are the first to 'cooment' on my work, no one else has.
Rovers or Mondeo, I am told they are produced abroad nowadays. What's the world coming to? Don't answer that.
You may uncross fingers now.


Taggart (posted on: 30-07-12)
For non-Brits: Taggart is a Scottish detective TV programme . The pilot episode "Killer" introduced the character of Detective Chief Inspector Jim Taggart (played by Mark McManus until his death in 1994). Despite the death of the title character, the series continued with the same name.

When I hear the word 'Murder' I immediately think of Taggart in which the Scottish burr plays an important part. Set in the city of Glasgow, it is drama at its best with cops chasing criminals without a moment rest. The man in the lead role may not be the same but the series has retained its original name. In it are three detectives, Reid, Fraser and Ross led by Matt Burke their irritable boss. The scenes are realistic but are never lewd; you won't see the actors appearing in the nude. The scripts are truly gritty and the action is tough. I have seen many episodes and can't get enough. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Taggart
Andrea on 30-07-2012
Taggart
Ooooh, I love Taggart! He died whilst filming series 11, and the 'new bloke' didn't' appear until series 18 (when Jardine, the horrible pig, died) - I can't find series 18 anywhere, which is very annoying as I have watched 1-17 now! And what about Reid? Jeez, she could open tins with that nose! Fab pome, Luigi - spot on!

Author's Reply:
I have lost track of where things stand. I read of a dispute with ITV and as a consequence it would only be shown in Scotland. Also the actor who played Stuart Fraser (Colin McCredie) was axed from the show.
I keep watching repeats, but then it is always repeats in summer.
As far as Reid is concerned that nose is useful to sniff out villains but it doesn't do much for her romantic life.
Thanks for the comment and rating.

Luigi x

Weefatfella on 30-07-2012
Taggart
There's been a murder, naebody move. Brilliant.
I always had the opinion that Taggart was based on William McIlvanney's Laidlaw.

It might just be me but if you enjoy Taggart have a look.

William McIlvanney has written three detective stories featuring the same main character: Detective Inspector Jack Laidlaw. The novels are Laidlaw (1977); The Papers of Tony Veitch (1983) and Strange Loyalties (1991).

These detective stories have been influenced by the American detective fiction of Raymond Chandler.

This influence can be seen in their air of gritty reality, their doubting and often unhappy hero and their use of fast, witty dialogue. I copied and pasted this from William McIlvanney’s Laidlaw Novels on the net.



Author's Reply:
I must confess that I was completely unaware of William McIlvanney and his Laidlaw novels and will endeavour to read them. There are so many detective stories and characters that it is difficult to keep track of them all. Although I like Taggart, my favourite Scottish sleuth is Ian Rankin's Rebus.
Thanks for reading and commenting.

niece on 31-07-2012
Taggart
The show sounds very interesting, Luigi...wish I could've watched it...we do get BBC Entertainment out here though...Good poem!!!

Regds,
niece

Author's Reply:
It was a detective TV series for domestic consumption, niece, and I doubt very much if it was ever broadcast abroad. It was entertaining as far as police dramas go.
Nice to hear from you.

Luigi x

sunken on 02-08-2012
Taggart
I myself used to watch said series too, Mr. Ionicus. I must admit though, there were times I could have done with subtitles. It's amazing how accents can vary so much over such relitvely small distances. I blame lulu. Anyway, a very nice poem indeed. The only crime here, from what I can deduce, is that it remains nib-less. I blame government cutbacks. And lulu. Thank you.

s
u
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k
e
n



Author's Reply:
Hello Mr.Sunken, nice to hear from you as usual. If you needed subtitles I needed a translator. Have the government cut back on nibs as well? Blooming cheek! Whatever next? Should I blame lulu too?I am on the horn of a dilemma. Very painful I can tell you.
Having run out of silly things to say, it remains for me to thank you and say cheerio.

Texasgreg on 03-08-2012
Taggart
Now did I read this already and not leave a comment or did you already do one with the same character? Anywho, I don't know the show, but not feel I know the scheme of things. There was a show like that here in the 70's that had a character change, but can't grasp the name...
Good changeup for poetry on a usually dreary subject.
Photobucket
Greg πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Hi Greg. You may have seen this in the Forum as it was my entry to the weekly prose/poetry challenge. The prompt was MURDER. It is unlikely that you know the show; it was intended purely for domestic viewing, i.e U.K.
Thanks for reading and commenting.

Luigi πŸ™‚

CVaughan on 03-08-2012
Taggart

As a devotee of the world-weary woebegone looking actor Mcmanus I ought to be able to comment on this. You sum up the history of the series nicely Luigi. I never took to the replacement, the original titular Mr. T. was not replaceable IMO. The ever irascible detective and his triple r delivery of "murderrr" was missing and I couldn't watch on after his sad demise, personally. Great pick of subject & write though.

Author's Reply:
Frank, I am in total agreement: Mark McManus was unique in the role of Jim Taggart and the ones who followed him were in a different mould.
Thanks for letting me have your thoughts.

Luigi

dylan on 03-08-2012
Taggart
Ahh-"There`s been a murdur"!
In the Mark McManus days, they used to film all over Glasgow.I met him in a pub on the outskirts of the city not long before he died.(Like meself, he enjoyed a tipple!)
Nice poem, Luigi-I have lost track of the series.
(Prefer "Rebus" now, which is set in (gulp) Edinburgh!)
Orrabest,

D.

Author's Reply:
Hi Jon. It's hard being a Scot and not enjoying a tipple.
Same here, I don't know what's happened to the series. I have always preferred Rebus, especially with Ken Stott in the role, but then I am a devotee of Ian Rankin's novels. Whether the background is Glasgow or Edinburgh, the stories are brilliant.
Cheers.

Luigi

dylan on 04-08-2012
Taggart
Ken Stott is brilliant as Rebus.
BTW-Mark McManus was the brother of the singer in the glam rock band Sweet!-(Maybe called Brian Connolly?-can`t remember).
(Absolutely true!)Poem is great, young man!

Author's Reply:
Yes Jon, Ken Stott is the definite Rebus.
I didn't know about the brother of Mark McManus. One lives and learns. Thanks for letting me know.


The Case Of The Disappearing Sock (posted on: 20-07-12)
My entry to this week's Forum Challenge. The prompt was SOCKS.

I employed Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple and Sherlock to solve the eternal mystery of the disappearing sock. I talk of it in the singular as I have its twin brother. It won't be much use to me if I haven't got the other. Maybe I could compromise and wear an unmatched pair but they'd look ridiculous and everyone would stare. I watch the rinse and spin with my eyes transfixed: I want to find out why my socks are so jinxed. The drum revolves at speed and all I can see is suds. I am a bit apprehensive as I also hear some thuds. And when the machine stops I know what I shall face: the sought after item has vanished without trace. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for The Case Of The Disappearing Sock
amman on 20-07-2012
The Case Of The Disappearing Sock
Very funny Luigi and so darned (excuse the pun) ironically true. I've got a drawer full if you want to swap. Will be surprised if you don't win the challenge with this one.
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
Hi Tony. No - shocking as it may sound - it didn't win the challenge. The judge let me down.
We shall overcome.
Cheers.

cooky on 20-07-2012
The Case Of The Disappearing Sock
It is the sock gremlins to blame. The beginning of the write gives the importance of this serious problem. So i like this.

Author's Reply:
It seems to be a universal problem, cooky, and a very serious one. That famous detectives have failed to solve it is very worrying.
Glad you liked this and thank you for letting me know.

Texasgreg on 23-07-2012
The Case Of The Disappearing Sock
Aye! That's why I only wear white socks...well, one reason. I almost overlooked as I thought I had already commented, but that was on Frank's. Wouldn't want ya to sock me, hehe.

Funny 'un, Luigi,
Photobucket.
Greg πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
I tried that ruse, Greg, but after the wash one sock would remain white whereas the other came out grey thus making the two unmatched once again. I may have to try that detergent that promises to give me clothes whiter than whiter.
Do you remember Goldie Hawn saying 'Sock it to me' on the Rowan and Martin's Laugh-in? I could be showing my age here but I don't care.

niece on 23-07-2012
The Case Of The Disappearing Sock
Disappearing socks are indeed a mystery...I've tried to figure out various solutions...never considered calling in the sleuths...should do that, I think...a good fun write...enjoyed...

Regds,
niece

Author's Reply:
I have come to the conclusion that no one, not even the combined force of those celebrated detectives, can produce a satisfactory answer so we might as well accept the situation and buy socks of the same colour as Greg suggested.

Luigi x


In The Footsteps Of Catullus (posted on: 16-07-12)
***

Oh, how I wish that I could write raunchy and risky ribald rhymes just like the ones Catullus wrote in his Sirmione villa in Roman times. His words were addressed to lovers and enemies and he had no shame in using sexual terms that are taboo even today. His poems are not tame. He freely speaks of homosexuality and to Cato he recounts a threesome - with his girl, his pupil and himself - that was unexpected but welcome. Obsessed with a girl he calls Lesbia, to whom he has utterly lost his heart, he laments to Caelius that he's found that in reality she is a proper tart whose favours are liberally granted to the outstanding citizens of Rome. This discovery has upset the poor poet who has retired to sulk at his home. There is no topic that he didn't tackle. Even the delicate subject of incest, which wasn't uncommon in his circles, was dealt in the same way as the rest. I'm afraid that I cannot match his style, that I can only offer a saccharine verse which describes romance and true love; our poetry could not be more diverse. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for In The Footsteps Of Catullus
amman on 16-07-2012
In The Footsteps Of Catullus
Hi Luigi. I had to look up Catallus; seems he was the greatest writer of lyric verse of his time. You're not so bad yourself. Found this informative and well rhymed. Don't know how you do it.
Regards.

Author's Reply:
Hi Tony. He was a bit of a reprobate but also a good poet who wrote over a hundred poems. He didn't mince words and spoke his mind. Was highly regarded in his time and he greatly influenced poets such as Ovid, Horace, and Virgil. His explicit writing style, though maybe shocking to some, was perhaps accepted in an era when hedonism was at his height.
Best, Luigi.

Texasgreg on 16-07-2012
In The Footsteps Of Catullus
Aye! Made the old man blush, Luigi. I'd give him something for it, but they make those damn Advil blue these days and I get 'em all mixed up. πŸ˜‰

Good Job!
Photobucket.
Greg πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Hiya Greg. It is so damn confusing to find that all matter of pills now seem to be blue and of similar shape.
I took one for my headache. The pain didn't go and I got side effects. Better not to tell Catullus, he might come up with a new poem.

Cheers.

niece on 16-07-2012
In The Footsteps Of Catullus
It would seem nothing has changed much with time...only now we have a media to report every little nuance of societal downfall...

A good poem, Luigi...

Regds,
niece

Author's Reply:
Hello niece. Nothing is new under the sun, as they say. Although nowadays we have many types of media to let us know of our fellows misdemeanor, in Roman times gossip soon spread by word of of mouth and everybody was exposed to public scrutiny. In intellectual circles, poets like Catullus would satirise the sexual mores of the Roman aristocracy in explicit verse and would not exclude his own conduct.

Kind regards, Luigi.

Andrea on 16-07-2012
In The Footsteps Of Catullus
Those Italians, eh? What a naughty bunch!

Looks like an interesting character alright --> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catullus

Much enjoyed your pome, Luigi, which cause me to do a Google (even though I'd heard of him, I have to confess that I wasn't very knowledgeable).

Author's Reply:
Not all Italians are like that, Andrea, I am different: try me. (I bet they all say that, don't fall for that ploy.)
He was definitely a remarkable character; wasn't short of a bob or two - he had a few villas throughout Italy and Sirmione was his favourite retreat. Not a member of the working classes, he enjoyed the dolce vita.
He enjoyed the favours of Clodia Metelli (his beloved Lesbia) until he found out that half of Rome (including her brother) were the beneficiaries of her largesse. Of his vast repertoire I particularly liked his poem No. 56
Thanks for reading this effort of mine.

Luigi x

stormwolf on 16-07-2012
In The Footsteps Of Catullus
Ha ha Good one Luigi!
I am sure you could turn your hand to some naughty poetry, have done it myself in my time πŸ˜‰
Alison x

Author's Reply:
Yes Alison, I too have turned my hand to some salacious poetry - surely you are familiar with this book of mine https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/14893 (Naughty But Nice) - but I could never write with the same panache as Catullus. He was a master of the genre.
Thanks for the comment.

Luigi x

ChairmanWow on 19-07-2012
In The Footsteps Of Catullus
History is full of great characters. Like the wife of the Byzantine emperor Justinian who said something to the effect " My only regret in life is not having more orifices to pleasure my lovers." Catullus would be very much at home on the West Coast of the USA in the present day. Hollywood could use some new(old) inspired writing. Nicely done Luigi.

Ralph

Author's Reply:
Theodora, the eventual wife of Justinian, was quite a character. Many sources said that she had an unlimited lust. She would have been the type to appeal to Catullus had she lived in his time but it seems that there was an abundance of such ladies on which to draw his inspiration.


A Winter Holiday (posted on: 06-07-12)
My entry to this week's Forum challenge. The prompt was HOLIDAY.

You may not believe it yet this story is true. The sky was cloudless, the sea limpid and blue. The sun was nice and hot but we didn't need a shade; the children built sandcastles with their bucket and spade. I dipped a toe in the water even though I had been told that the North Sea in winter is exceptionally cold. It was Christmas day in a seaside of England. We relaxed, sunbathing, on the beach of Kessingland. It occurred only once and it never happened again: in subsequent years it was back to snow or rain. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for A Winter Holiday
Texasgreg on 07-07-2012
A Winter Holiday
Aye, weather anomalies. Adapt and take full advantage. It snowed here last Christmas, hehe. I built a little snowman and took a picture every hour whilst he melted. I turned it into a little video clip...neat, it was.
Photobucket.
Good job, Luigi !

Greg πŸ™‚



Author's Reply:
Hi Greg. The weather is usually predictable here in the UK but extreme conditions also occur. In addition to the episode recounted above, I remember a year when it snowed in June. Lately we have had a lot of rain because, so we are told, the Jet Stream has shifted. As a consequence many areas have been flooded.
Many tennis matches at Wimbledon have been disrupted and only the games that were played in the Centre Court, which has a retractable roof, have been immune.
Anyway, that's enough about the weather. All that remains to me is to give thanks to you for your welcome comments.

Luigi.

RoyBateman on 08-07-2012
A Winter Holiday
I can recall walking about on Christmas Day in shirtsleeves, though maybe I wasn't sober at the time. Mm...forget that. Seriously, you were damn lucky to get a warm winter spell on the East Coast! ("It's so bracing" ie "It's f***ing freezing" was the best the GNR could come up with, and that says something.) And these freak warm winters were, amazingly, before "global warming" was ever heard of - notice how that phrase has sunk without trace, as it HASN'T got warmer since 2000? Yeah, now it's "climate change" as if that's not been the case since the dawn of time.
A timely reminder, Luigi - we can never rely on the weather here, and just occasionally it's better than expected. Well done!

Author's Reply:
Hi Roy, having experienced the vagaries of the weather, I have finally understood why it is the favourite topic for an Englishman. I now find myself following the weather forecast more than other programmes on TV.
Mind you, I also take notice of the weather girls and their delivery.
Cheers.

Ani on 08-07-2012
A Winter Holiday
Last year, I managed to swim in Deal on the English Channel on the 28th of October, just like yours it was a sunny. increadible day.
Fureya


Author's Reply:
Hello Fureya, welcome.
You had a much better experience than the one I had, many years ago, at Christchurch in the south of England
in the middle of August. It was boiling hot and I decided to go for a swim. The water was so cold that when I came out I couldn't stop shivering even wearing a heavy woollen jumper. I am more used to the Mediterranean sea where the waters don't deceive one.

Best, Luigi.

niece on 12-07-2012
A Winter Holiday
The lowest recorded temperature in recent times hereabouts is 11 degree C...it was low enough for people in Mumbai to pull out their woollies and jackets...

Enjoyed your poem, Luigi...

Regds,
niece

Author's Reply:
Hiya niece. The temperature here in the UK is much below par and we should be in the middle of summer. The weather is inconstant and we are subjected to a lot of rain which have caused floods in many regions.
All to do with the Jet Stream, it is said.
Let's hope things improve.

Luigi x

ChairmanWow on 12-07-2012
A Winter Holiday
Luigi,
this poem brought back memories of how much i despised lifeless winter in Illinois growing up. I always wished for a break such as you have described so well here!

Ralph

Author's Reply:
I quite understand your frustration at having to endure a lifeless winter, Ralph. There is nothing better than a sunny, warm day to galvanise one into action.


By Jingo, It's Wimbledon (posted on: 29-06-12)
New balls, please.

There are temperamental tennis players with raw emotions they can hardly handle. Maybe they ought to examine their motives and question if the game is worth the candle. I believe the reason they throw tantrums, dispute line calls and smash their racquet, is the prize money's alluring availability: if you fail to win a match, you lose a packet. Mind you, they are not all driven by lucre; some will play for the honour of their flag. They carry on with pride, rarely winning ; the fact that they aren't seeded is a snag. The crowd will cheer if they are 'one of us', it doesn't matter if English, Welsh or Scot. Of course, it does demonstrate jingoism, if they are no good we will not care a jot. Every year we arrive with plenty of hope expecting more than five minutes of glory and invariably we fall at the first hurdle. It seems to be an inevitable sob story. Slowly but surely our dream evaporates but, undeterred, we don't give a damn. Because, one day, we may get new balls and, with luck, we'll win a Grand Slam. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for By Jingo, It's Wimbledon
Texasgreg on 29-06-2012
By Jingo, Its Wimbledon
Luigi,

Expert on the bait-and-switch, eh? Got me on the new balls. I was hoping for some useful information, hehe. Don't look now, but I think sunk is slinking around here.

Not a tennis fan, but thoroughly enjoy your writing about it.



Good stuff!

Photobucket.



Greg πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Sorry, Greg, I can't offer any useful information about the game apart from conveying the partisan feeling of the crowd whenever a GB competitor goes into the arena. Too much reliance is placed on a victorious outcome for the native player. *GB, in case you are wondering, stands for Great Britain*.
There is no malice in my comment and I wish good luck to everyone in their endeavour, it is just an observation. Cheers.


Andrea on 29-06-2012
By Jingo, Its Wimbledon
Hoorah! I love Wimbledon. Needless to say it's been raining, but oh joy! now they have the roof on centre. Love how they're still banging on about Virginia Wade's win in...'66, was it? Can't stand the ghastly, arrogant Murray either...oh well, Nadal for me again then πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Hi Andrea, events have overtaken us and poor (relatively speaking) Nadal has been knocked out of the competition. So, what's the first thing coming out of the BBC experts' mouth? "This has opened the door for Murray". Purleez!
Or in other words QED.

Luigi x

Andrea on 29-06-2012
By Jingo, Its Wimbledon
Has he? How did I miss that! So had Venus, who is, apparently, 'a shadow of her former self' after being diagnosed with SjΓΆgren's Syndrome, poor girl.

Have to be Federer then...(Murray my arse!)

Author's Reply:
It happened late last night, roundabout 10 o'clock; a five sets defeat by a young Czech rated 100. That's life.
Well, I am off for the weekend. I shall return on Monday to catch up with the latest entries.
Ta ta for now.

Luigi x

Andrea on 29-06-2012
By Jingo, Its Wimbledon
I shall no doubt see the replay this afternoon, 11pm (my time) being past my bedtime πŸ™‚

Have a great weekend - hope you're going somewhere nice. And hey! What about the Germany defeat then? Double hurrah!

Toodle pip.

Author's Reply:
Italy: the Jekyll and Hyde of football. Great against Germany, abject versus Spain. Let's draw a line under it, as the pundits say.

Luigi x

soman on 29-06-2012
By Jingo, Its Wimbledon
Luigi, for me it is double benfit. I am an avid reader of your poems and admire the ease with which you handle the themes and words. And I love tennis. Loved Boris Becker in the eighties, and later, Pete Sampras, the all-time great.

Rated 9

Author's Reply:
I too love tennis, soman. I agree with you about Becker and Sampras. Federer is not bad either.
I am gratified to learn that you follow my poems and thank you for letting me know.

Best regards, Luigi

franciman on 29-06-2012
By Jingo, Its Wimbledon
Hi Luigi,

According to the Aussies and a cross-section of American Manhood, having balls will only guarantee you don't cry when defeated.

Strange old racket this sport thing!
And all the better for Your verse.

cheers,
Jim


Author's Reply:
I must have them, Jim, as I didn't cry last night when Italy were crushed by Spain at football. Nothing else to do but concentrate on the tennis from now on.
Thanks for the comment.

cooky on 29-06-2012
By Jingo, Its Wimbledon
Pride is all England can play for. It is not easy to get a game on a real court if your a lad with no dosh. excellent write.

Author's Reply:
It used to be a game for the privileged, cooky, but nowadays it is more accessible. I wouldn't go so far as saying that English players are no-hopers. There some promising youngsters; we'll have to see how they develop.

ChairmanWow on 02-07-2012
By Jingo, Its Wimbledon
Tennis /players would be a good symbol of poetry/poets. WE all have our favorites. Enjoyable as always Luigi.

Ralph

Author's Reply:
Indeed we all have our favourites, Ralph. Mine at the moment is Roger Federer, but not exclusively; I love to see good tennis regardless of who provides it.
Glad you enjoyed the ditty, thanks.

niece on 02-07-2012
By Jingo, Its Wimbledon
Tennis, cricket...does anybody play for the love of the game anymore??? Good one, Luigi...

Regds,
niece

Author's Reply:
I am beginning to doubt it, niece.
Thank you very much for your appreciation.

Luigi x


Nice Weather In Nice (posted on: 22-06-12)
It only rained twice.

This morning I got a postcard. I noticed at once, from the foreign stamp, that it came from France. It had been sent, first class, by my favourite niece who, to learn the language, is an au-pair in Nice. She said that she was well and the weather was nice although in the past fortnight it had rained twice. She's met the local talent which she declares trθs bon but, being very sensible, she knows how to say non. She's a firm believer in love at first sight and I'm sure one day she'll find her Mr. Right. In the meantime she enjoys her friends' camaraderie and does not indulge in romantic reverie. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Nice Weather In Nice
amman on 22-06-2012
Nice Weather In Nice
Hi Luigi. Well to get to the niceties, I enjoyed this.
Cheers

Author's Reply:
Niceties, eh? Very good. Nice of you to let me know you enjoyed this, amman. Thank you.

Texasgreg on 22-06-2012
Nice Weather In Nice
Hope your niece has a has a nice time, Luigi.
Photobucket.
Good stuff!

Peace,

Greg πŸ™‚


Author's Reply:
I am sure she has, Greg. Thanks.

CVaughan on 22-06-2012
Nice Weather In Nice

Oh yes Nice, I remember it well. Well, as you will remember I liked this Luigi well enough. It explores niceness neatly and sweetly. Smart writing with 3 versions of the phonic differences in exploring the range of a single word I was guilty of setting. Thanks. Frank

Author's Reply:
Hi Frank. You are indeed responsible for my putting pen to paper in response to the challenge you set. Thanks for the prompt.

Andrea on 23-06-2012
Nice Weather In Nice
Very sensible gal, your niece, those frogs can be a menace πŸ™‚ I lived in Nice for a while (longer in Cannes) and it (they) are both very nice, as long as you leave before the film festival when both places turn into nightmares...

Author's Reply:
You have lived a varied and interesting life, Andrea, and I recall you saying that you married one of those frogs so you have an advantage over me as regards knowledge of the French. I haven't been to either places, although a cousin of mine lived in Cannes.

ChairmanWow on 23-06-2012
Nice Weather In Nice
Luigi,
I have to add a grain of salt to the moderate activity reports i get from my nieces. Fun to be in Nice, i'm sure.

Ralph

Author's Reply:
Ralph, it is always fun spending some time abroad and, although I haven't been to Nice, I am told it is very nice.

Rabelais on 23-06-2012
Nice Weather In Nice
Hi! That is very impressive. Love the rhyme of the second part of this poem. 'tres Bon & non" very clever!

Author's Reply:
Hi Rabelais. I am glad you found this piece to your liking and for letting me know. Thanks.

sunken on 24-06-2012
Nice Weather In Nice
Hello Mr. Luigi. She sounds like she has her head screwed on and no mistake. A lovely read that flows like a flowy thing, a river for example. By the way, Italy Vs England tonight. I'm wondering where you stand (and don't say your living room). Please be assured that your response will illicit no ill feeling from my good self. Apparently it's going to be quite a tight match. I blame austerity measures. Nice work, Luigi. I enjoyed very much.

s
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k
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n



Author's Reply:
Hello Sunks, my old mate. Your comment reminds me of A Flo and my attempts at seducing her. But that is another story. As far as Italy v. England, I watched the game last night in Bath, the city not the container, from where I returned this morning. A bit disappointed that it went to penalties but, on balance, I believe Italy deserved the victory. Germany will be a different kettle of fish but let's hope we can hook them.
Did you see Angela Merkel applauding as the Greeks were being thrashed? Haven't they suffered enough with the austerity measures? I say: let them eat cakes. Hold on, I have a feeling somebody has already said that.
But I digress. Thanks very much for your communication. Greetings to you and Bernard.

RoyBateman on 24-06-2012
Nice Weather In Nice
Mm...good place to be an au pair! Not that I know it, but I bet it's not a cheap place to live - so living in sounds great. Always a good idea to travel and get to know something of the world when you're young, and if she can spare the time to send postcards to her uncle, she sounds a sensible sort of girl. Good luck to her!
ps Mind you, it's only rained twice here in the past month - once for fourteen days, once for fifteen. Webbed feet, anyone?

Author's Reply:
Don't talk to me about rain, Roy. Last Saturday, on my way to a restaurant, I got drenched. The umbrella absolutely useless. I wish I had gone to Nice myself but there is no much call for a male septuagenarian au pair, I am told.
Cheers.

Andrea on 25-06-2012
Nice Weather In Nice
Never married him, Luigi, had more sense πŸ™‚ Did live in France for a few years, though, but aforementioned Frog was met in Amsterdam...

PS. Italy deserved to win πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:

sunken on 27-06-2012
Nice Weather In Nice
Hello, Mr. Luigi. Isn't it warm? We need a storm. Anyway, yes. I agree. Italy deserved the win. England seemed to run out of steam. That said, they did better, and progressed, more than many people expected. I shall now turn my focus and support towards your Italy. Yes Luigi, think of me as a honoury Italian. Oh I may not have a way with women or drive a big red sports car, but I do eat pizza and am quite partial to a lasagna. Is this racist? I don't mean to be. I really do like pizza. Anyway, good luck against Germany. It'll be a tough one. You've done well to get this far though. Thank you.

s
u
n
k
e
n

inventor of the horizontal coffee vending machine

Author's Reply:
Dear Mr. Sunken, anyone who likes pizza and lasagna is automatically an honorary Italian citizen but please tell me that you abhor sour krauts.
Looks as if you got your wish about the storm as the weather forecast warns about wind and rain all over the country.
Don't worry about women and sports car, they are overrated. At least, that's my excuse for failing to get either.
Having seen one semi end on penalties, I dread tonight's game. Fingers crossed.


A Sticky Wicket (posted on: 18-06-12)
Not many people know that inside the Vatican, one can find an Olympics worth of different sports taking place, such as judo, tennis, cycling, clay pigeon shooting and soccer. But what about cricket?

I bought myself a ticket to watch a game of cricket. A match made in heaven with the Vatican Eleven. They'll be led by the Pope, hence they're full of hope. The opposition is gullible, believes that he's infallible but he's prone to bad luck: could be out for a duck. Now, intent on playing hard, they'll field the Swiss Guard. But they suffer great fatigue and are bottom of the league. We shall see a good spectacle yet won't witness any miracle: with the losses that they had they'll not rise from the dead. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for A Sticky Wicket
amman on 18-06-2012
A Sticky Wicket
Very clever luigi; made me laugh. What other shenanigans going on inside that are 'just not cricket old chap'.

Author's Reply:
Who knows what secrets are kept within those walls, amman. It is rumoured that they are jealously kept, more secure than those of the Security Services.

Andrea on 18-06-2012
A Sticky Wicket
Hahaha, excellent! Good job god's on everyone's side, innit?

Author's Reply:
He seems to be on everybody's side. That shows impartiality surely.

Luigi x

stormwolf on 18-06-2012
A Sticky Wicket
They’ll be led by the Pope,
hence they’re full of hope.
The opposition is gullible,
believes that he’s infallible

Luigi at his best! πŸ˜‰
Alison x
congrats on the nib

Author's Reply:
Alison, thank you.

Luigi x

jay12 on 18-06-2012
A Sticky Wicket
Superb! Anything that mocks the church is good for me!

Author's Reply:
It is our duty to poke fun at so called authorities now and then. Beware of eternal damnation, jay.

bluepootle on 18-06-2012
A Sticky Wicket
Very enjoyable! Made me smile.

Author's Reply:
Cheers, blue.

Luigi x

CVaughan on 18-06-2012
A Sticky Wicket

Hey Luigi, the Pope's German, course they should win at every sport, God forbid there'd be a penalty bowl-off eh?
Very satisfying piece of whimsy, to my taste your humourous verse. Frank

Author's Reply:
At cricket no chance, Frank. First of all, the rules would floor them - "what is this, when the players come out they are 'in'?" - and secondly their pride would be dented if they were caught at silly mid on.
Better stick at football.

Romany on 18-06-2012
A Sticky Wicket
Doubtless the outcome would be God's will regardless. Clever write,

Romany.

Author's Reply:
No divine intervention is allowed, Sue. Only the rain can stop play.

Luigi x

Texasgreg on 19-06-2012
A Sticky Wicket
Good wordplay with a hint of satire, Luigi.
Photobucket.
Good Stuff!

Greg :-0

Author's Reply:
Just a tiny bit, Greg. Thanks for reading it.

Luigi πŸ™‚

cooky on 19-06-2012
A Sticky Wicket
Clever subject and very entertaining. love it

Author's Reply:
Glad you approve of this humorous piece. Thank you.

ChairmanWow on 19-06-2012
A Sticky Wicket
Fun light-hearted verse. Rhymes great as always, Luigi.

Ralph

P.S. Do they have baseball?

Author's Reply:
Cheers, Ralph. Do they have baseball? I wouldn't be surprised; there must be enough American cardinals to organise a team.

RoyBateman on 21-06-2012
A Sticky Wicket
Cricket in The Vatican? I say! That conjures up an amazing picture... Whatever next - pro-cardinal darts? There seem to be planty of fat old geezers for that. Great off-the-wall idea, Luigi!

Author's Reply:
There are so many secrets within those walls, Roy. Who's to say they are not hiding a dartboard in the crypts.
Everything is possible. I suspect that they shout "CLXX" when scoring the maximum and that those chalices they hold during Mass are really sporting trophies, but it may be a flight of fancy on my part.

barenib on 22-06-2012
A Sticky Wicket
This reminds me of a programme I saw about gallery attendants from the Vatican playing a footy match against those from th Uffizi in Florence. You're right, they never mentioned cricket once! Good stuff as always, John.

Author's Reply:
Much appreciated, John. Thanks.
Cheers.


On Learning The Language (posted on: 15-06-12)
My entry to the weekly Forum challenge. The prompt was: Zounds. (Not for delicate ears).

When a foreigner like me arrives at Dover the first things he learns is that the natives are fond of two topics, the weather and the cricket with every pronouncement stressed by epithets. Thus we'll hear that having rained on St. Swithin's day, the wretched weather will remain the same for forty days. Blimey! Anderson only managed a maiden over so we let the West Indies off the hook. Gadzooks! Pietersen scored two hundred runs. Crikey! But the Aussies won nonetheless. Fuck me! This last expletive is as bad as it sounds; maybe we should paraphrase by using the word Zounds! © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for On Learning The Language
amman on 16-06-2012
On Learning The Language
Hi Luigi. Very topical and typical in a humorous vein. Liked it. Zounds!

Author's Reply:
Thanks amman. Another thing that foreigners quickly learn is the use of swear words.

stormwolf on 16-06-2012
On Learning The Language
Zounds a good idea to me.
Alison x

Author's Reply:
Foreigners should be very wary of using the vernacular, dear Alison. Thanks for reading.

Luigi x

CVaughan on 16-06-2012
On Learning The Language

Witty tackling of the zounds curve ball, Luigi. Liked what you did with it, as I said on the forum. Frank

Author's Reply:
Cheers Frank. It wasn't easy.

RoyBateman on 17-06-2012
On Learning The Language
You did well to even tackle such a baffling prompt, Luigi - I must admit that I don't believe I've ever used the word in my entire life. Then, I'm not even sure what it means. If anything... Never mind, you gave us a good chuckle anyway!

Author's Reply:
If you think it was baffling, Roy, you are not alone: I had to Google it to see what it meant. I learnt that:
(a) Zounds are an English anarchist band formed in 1977;
(b) It is used to express anger, surprise, or indignation. [Shortening and alteration of
God's wounds!.]
Not knowing anything about the anarchist band I opted for plan B. (Hold on a sec! Am I being influenced by Ed Balls here?)
Any road, that how this silly piece came about. Good to hear it generated a chuckle.

Andrea on 17-06-2012
On Learning The Language
Hahaha...not at all bad for a Johnny Foreigner, Luigi. God's teeth man, I'll give you a 9!

Author's Reply:
Good grief, madam, a 9! Shock, horror! Whatever next?
*goes in search of further interjections*

Luigi x


Images (posted on: 11-06-12)
***

There are certain images that become iconic; some deadly serious, other more ironic. Of two such photographs I have total recall: one of a pretty girl clutching a tennis ball next to a plump buttock which makes us aware that underneath her skirt she has no underwear. We are meant to smile at this amusing scene; it is quite innocent and not at all obscene. Tennis Girl The child that is depicted in the second picture is the victim of a war that was subject to stricture. A naked girl is yelling with burns caused by napalm, the bombardment continues without any qualm. Of the two snapshots the latter is so poignant that it makes the other photo almost irrelevant. And yet, given the choice, I'd rather laugh than cry. We ought to live in peace or, at least, give it a try. Napalm girl © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Images
amman on 11-06-2012
Images
Hi Luigi. Excellent and topical poem. You are a philosopher at heart. Perhaps plural snapshot(s).
Regards

Author's Reply:
Thanks amman. Definitely snapshots. Silly mistake.
Best, Luigi.

barenib on 12-06-2012
Images
Luigi, these are indeed two iconic images and you have incorporated them well into this witty and touching poem - good stuff, John.

Author's Reply:
Many thanks for your appreciative feedback, John. The tennis girl's poster was very popular in the 70's and went on to sell 2 million copies. The Vietnam girl's photograph had a much bigger impact and exposed the inhumanity of the war. The worldwide outcry hastened the end of that conflict.
Best, Luigi.

stormwolf on 12-06-2012
Images
Hi Luigi
Yes, we want to live in peace but while we are being dumbed down by pics of the first, we are being enured to pics of the second.

The real contrast between sensual and humanitarian.
Alison x

Author's Reply:
Thanks for reading and commenting, dear Alison.
Perhaps you'd like to read the background to how the first picture came about. Here is the link:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1368795/Athenas-iconic-Tennis-Girl-Fiona-Walker-revealed-35-years-on.htm
The second photograph is self-explanatory. I know which is the more obscene.

Luigi x

JackKoozie on 13-06-2012
Images
This was very good, Ionicus, and thought provoking and I agree with you - far better to choose to laugh rather than cry. An excellent rhyming poem. Well done! By the way, I like the way you have used the contrast of the photographs to illustrate your point.



Jack

Author's Reply:
Jack, your comment is greatly appreciated and it is pleasing to see that someone else agrees with my views.
I wasn't quite sure how many people knew or remembered the Athena poster's girl and thought that by showing the picture it would make my point clearer and subsequently posted the other photo to show the contrast.

Best, Luigi.

Texasgreg on 13-06-2012
Images
Luigi, To me, that's what poetry is in all of its essence.

Edited: And yes, I remember both photos very well. The second photo is an indication why we minded our business in the U.S. for a generation 'till memories waned and bruised egos inflated.


Photobucket.



Great stuff!





Greg πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Greg, too kind. Feedback most welcome. I suspect that the nomination came from you and if that is case a thousand thanks to you, otherwise to whoever was gracious enough to do so.

RoyBateman on 14-06-2012
Images
Only just got to this, but very glad I did - you certainly have used two totally different but...yes, I think the overused term "Iconic" is fully justified here...photos to make your point, which I fully endorse. Of course, the tennis player was artfully posed while the latter gives the impression of a snap shot, in the proper sense of the term. Was it Donald McCuillin? Can't remember now, but the impact was rightly enormous.
Yes, I saw the articles about that first piccie a while ago, and I bet the model wishes she still looked like that! It's a real gem - erotic and arousing but without being in the least offensive. Well, I (still) think so anyway! Great work, Luigi, and a very thoughtful juxtaposition.

ps. You know, in an age where we can't take school play photos of our own kids in case we're all raging paedos, I really do wonder whather any modern picture editor would dare print that second photo? Nowadays, it might have gone completely unknown for reasons the photographer never intended. Just a thought...

Author's Reply:
Hi Roy. I grant you the the term 'Iconic' is overused but any word, if quoted often enough, soon becomes something of a clichΓ©. It is very easy for an author to fall into the trap.
In answer to your question, the tennis player's photo was taken by Martin Elliott who was her boyfriend at the time. The shot of the terrified Vietnamese girl by Nick Ut. I am relying here on information provided by Wikipedia.
You are so right in your assumption that the photograph of Kim Phuc, the napalm girl, would not published today. The irony is that every day we hear of paedophiles being able to trawl the internet and preying on children through chat rooms or porno sites. Some are caught but many escape the net.

CVaughan on 16-06-2012
Images

Splendid use of those familiar images Luigi to make your good human and humane observations. Further words would serve only to reiterate much already contributed as I have read all the other comments. Well done on the nom and nib, deserved. Frank

Author's Reply:
Frank, I am much obliged for your observations. I felt that the images spoke for themselves and the words were almost superfluous.

ChairmanWow on 17-06-2012
Images
Duality is mankind's truth. One photo can represent all the people slaughtered who didn't get their pictures' in Time. But delving into these contrasts are what literature is for. Nicely done Luigi.

Ralph

Author's Reply:
I thank you for your insight, Ralph. I appreciate that people may have contrasting views on world events and, as you rightly say, literature can be a useful tool for highlighting them. It can also be used for expressing one's own opinions and I have never hidden my belief that wars, fought for whatever ideologies, are abhorrent; they never are about freedom.

Regards, Luigi.

ValDohren on 17-09-2012
Images
Very moving and poignant write.

Author's Reply:
Hello and welcome to the site.
Thank you for reading and commenting. Much appreciated.


The Great Fire Of Rome (posted on: 08-06-12)
On the night of July 19, 64 A.D., a fire broke out among the shops lining the Circus Maximus, Rome's mammoth chariot stadium.

While Rome burned, Nero played the lyre; not in the Imperial City but at Antium. Therefore he wasn't responsible for the fire. The gods were blamed: it was Jupiter's bolt which sparked off the initial conflagration to give the decadent ruling class a jolt. Then with Boreas's aid the flames increased and when Pluvius refused to unleash the rain it was evident that all deities were displeased. Other theories were put forward to mislead: it was the Christians' fault, an obscure sect which was the perfect scapegoat for this deed. Whatever the cause, the fire was unchecked and ran wildly through the ravaged streets. The aftermath looked a dreadful prospect. There were no walls or solid obstructions to arrest the relentless flaming progress and save the city from total destruction. That Rome could be no more was the belief of the stricken populace, but after six days the fire was stamped out, to great relief. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for The Great Fire Of Rome
Romany on 08-06-2012
The Great Fire Of Rome
Great work and very knowledgeable, if slightly tongue in cheek, writing.



Romany.

Author's Reply:
Hi Sue, you are quick off the mark today. So much the better. Receiving favourable comments in the morning sets up my day and I feel reinvigorated. Thanks for that.

Luigi x

Andrea on 08-06-2012
The Great Fire Of Rome
Indeed, there's much speculation as yo whether Nero did, indeed 'fiddle while Rome burned' --> Great_Fire_of_Rome

It makes a good story, but my opinion is that he didn't. Another good and interesting piece, Luigi.

Author's Reply:
I agree, Andrea. I too am of the same opinion. The legend arose because Nero fancied himself as a musician. The historian Tacitus places him in Antium when the fire started and for all we know he may have been playing the lyre there but the act would have had no relevance to the tragic event. In fact Tacitus tells us that the maligned Emperor was so concerned about the risk that Rome faced that he immediately returned to the capital tp organise a relief effort which he paid from his own funds.

Luigi x

Texasgreg on 09-06-2012
The Great Fire Of Rome
It was in the news recently that a Russian missile test seen in the skies over Israel, Syria and other Middle East countries was thought to be signs from God on various events. We haven't matured much, if at all, have we?

Good stuff, Luigi.

Photobucket.

Texasgreg

Author's Reply:
Howdy, pardner? I like the new gun-toting Texasgreg.
You are so right. People are so gullible that they believe what they want to believe.
Thanks for stopping by.


Here Is The News (posted on: 04-06-12)
My entry to last Wednesday Forum challenge. The keyword was KARMA.

I had a light snack around one o'clock, a slice of Cantaloupe melon with Prosciutto di Parma. The news was on TV: the military in Burma, who'd called her a felon, had freed Aung San Suu Kyi. In Syria and Afghanistan there seemed to be bad karma, Kabul attacked by the Taliban, Damascus full of drama. And Tibet was no exception; China heard the Dalai Llama demanding independence and Buddhist monks rioted against Sino intransigence. Whether you are glad or sad it doesn't make a difference; Formula 1 went ahead in the state of Bahrain (although some did recoil) as we have to show respect to kingdoms that have oil. There were reservations, about going to Baku to sing at the Eurovision but that is nothing new. It may be depressing and give us the blues but we won't ever stop listening to the news. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Here Is The News
cooky on 04-06-2012
Here Is The News
I like this. factual with a flow. More news should be done like this.

Author's Reply:
My grateful thanks for your appreciation, cooky.
Cheers.

Rupe on 04-06-2012
Here Is The News
I really liked this. It somehow reminded me of W H Auden's 'Letter to Lord Byron' - the conversational tone and flow of comment on current affairs with a hint of an underlying standpoint.

Rupe

Author's Reply:
Hello Rupert, long time no see. I hope you are well.
'Letter to Lord Byron' is a very clever travelogue in verse and its conversational tone is much to be admired.
It is gratifying to hear that my little effort has reminded you of such work and that you liked it.
Many thanks for letting me know.

Inchrory on 04-06-2012
Here Is The News
Hi Luigi,
Very topical poetry, it reads very well. I wonder if the newsreaders could handle it...

One slight niggle, the duplication of β€œthey” in the penultimate and last stanza.

As it is the news, which is being described- possibly β€œit” instead of β€œthey”

Anyway, very well done.

Morchuis.


Author's Reply:
You are quite right about the niggle, Inchrory. I have taken note and made the necessary amendment.
Thanks for pointing it out and of course for reading and commenting.

Best, Luigi.

Romany on 04-06-2012
Here Is The News
I like all of your work and your mischievious style, but I really like your more serious stuff. You are rather good at it you know. I know I have told you as much before, but I felt it worth repeating.

Romany.

Author's Reply:
Too kind, Sue. I am chuffed that you find my work worthwhile and I'll try to keep the standard up.
Your comments are very much appreciated.

Luigi x

sunken on 05-06-2012
Here Is The News
I quite liked that Swedish song that won Eurovision. It's probably very uncool to say that but I don't care. It's the sex pistol in me. Yes, Mr. Luigi, of all the important issues raised in your poem I choose Eurovision to focus on. I blame my upbrininging. A cracking poem. Nib worthy even.

s
u
n
k
e
n



Author's Reply:
Hello Mr. Sunken. I didn't watch the Eurovision song contest so I can't comment on the worthiness of the winning entry. I was told that Britain didn't fare well and the Russian Singing Grannies were a hoot. That is all I know, my knowledge is fairly limited on the topic.
Thanks for the suggestion that this piece should be nibbed. Usually your words do the trick.
Anyway, my thanks to you and Bernard for the encouragement.

Pennywise on 05-06-2012
Here Is The News
And that is why I do not watch the news anymore!



Author's Reply:
I still watch but take everything with a pinch of salt. I have given up newspapers though.

Best, Luigi.

Andrea on 05-06-2012
Here Is The News
How did I miss this, Luigi? Blame it on the Jubilee πŸ™‚

I am currently trying to limit my news intake as I find it increasingly depressing and gloomy.

Good topical pome, Luigi (although I didn't watch Eurovision either).

Author's Reply:
We all seem to have been busy with one thing or another, Andrea. I have skipped a few contributions in the last week. My excuse is not the Jubilee but the French Open; I was fascinated by those big, muscly legs and that was only the women. As for the men, one has to admire their skill. Feel sorry for Tsonga, so near and yet so far. I like Federer's style. I don't know why but the name Roger makes me think of Sharapova.
Anyway, my usual thanks to you.

Luigi x

CVaughan on 05-06-2012
Here Is The News

I admired the subtle construction from sliding into the seriousness via the initial domesticity to the nitty gritty bulletin points of selected happenings in this world of ours.
Frank

Author's Reply:
Cheers Frank for your appreciation. Much obliged.

Texasgreg on 05-06-2012
Here Is The News
Good stuff again, Luigi. Is it permissible to say ditto here?


Greg πŸ™‚


Author's Reply:
Ditto will do just fine, Greg. Thanks.

amman on 06-06-2012
Here Is The News
Hi Luigi. I missed this first time around. As Greg said - good stuff and ditto to Rupe's observations

Author's Reply:
Can't blame you for missing this, amman, it was right at the end of the queue. Glad you eventually found it.

Andrea on 06-06-2012
Here Is The News
Blast! Forgot about the French Open! Still, nearly time for Wimbledon, eh? Hoorah!

Author's Reply:
There is still time for you to watch the semifinals and finals, Andrea.

shangri-la on 06-06-2012
Here Is The News
I liked the flow of this, I loved the way you began with a light snack (sounds delicious) I think if news was written in this vain I might be tempted to read it more often.

Author's Reply:
Ah, Parma ham and melon! One of my favourite antipasti, the other being smoked salmon. The news nowadays seems to be more sensational than factual. I much prefer the humorous version 'Have I got news for you' on BBC1, Friday night.


Keywords (posted on: 01-06-12)
The Department of Homeland Security has released a list of keywords it uses to monitor social networking sites for signs of terrorist or other threats against the U.S. The intriguing list includes seemingly innocent words like 'pork, cloud, team, Mexico

Since I started eating with a silver-plated fork I wondered if it's proper to use it for roast pork. I have my own theory, but I'm not all that cert, that the above implement was intended for dessert. I used it with all foods - a fact of which I'm proud - but now the porcine meat has come under a cloud. Nothing is above suspicion and words, it would seem, are being scrutinised by a surveillance team. Under investigation is also the term 'Mexico'. This must be the action of an insane politico. The Homeland Security are his earnest employer; no wonder that the world suffers from paranoia. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Keywords
barenib on 01-06-2012
Keywords
Hi Luigi, assuming that you haven't been arrested, may I say this made me laugh on an otherwise dull Friday afternoon. John.

Author's Reply:
I am on the run, John and they haven't caught up with me yet. Pleased you found this amusing.
Cheers.

cooky on 01-06-2012
Keywords
Look on the bright side paranoia is giving someone a job.
I wonder if they pay mexico wages.

Author's Reply:
That is true, cooky. As for wages, they are at the top of the scale. Their job is of the utmost importance.

BPhoenix on 01-06-2012
Keywords
That most definatly made me chuckle. Good piece

Author's Reply:
Thanks BPhoenix for finding the humour in this piece enjoyable.

Andrea on 01-06-2012
Keywords
You trying to get us busted, Luigi, or what? I might have to 'bleep' out all your naughty words you naughty boy πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Naughty, moi? Never. I am always on-message. If anything I am misunderstood.

Texasgreg on 01-06-2012
Keywords
Did it again, Luigi. Niner in my book. Maybe Andrea will activate the hyperlinks? You took news and made it enjoyable enough to share and provoke thought.

Greg πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Thanks Greg. Sometimes news that are meant to be taken seriously are laughable and lend themselves to being ridiculed.

Romany on 02-06-2012
Keywords
Very skilful, as is your wont. Though having written it, be prepared for a knock on the door any day now...

Romany.

Author's Reply:
I wouldn't be surprised, Sue. Thanks for reading and commenting.

Luigi x

amman on 03-06-2012
Keywords
Hi Luigi. Liked it; very clever.


Author's Reply:
Much appreciated, amman, thanks.

shangri-la on 06-06-2012
Keywords
An enjoyable read, I love your sense of humour, it really shines in this. I like that your fork is 'silver plated' it left me musing on whether you'd ever attempted to eat soup with it. πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
The headline was so preposterous that it lent itself to be lampooned. Funny you should mention the soup, I tried using the fork but it didn't work, I wonder why. I shall try a straw.
Pleased that you enjoyed the read. Thanks.


Climate Change (posted on: 28-05-12)
The concern is sincere...

Some people are concerned about the climate change and will express opinions that sound rather strange. Denying that man is culpable they want to tell us how, by producing methane, it is the flatulent cow who's destroying the earth. Or else that it's sunspots which upset the weather and make the planet hot or unseasonably cold. We are meant to suppose that it was thanks to Nature that the river Thames froze. And they are shocked to hear that the polar caps melt. The concern is sincere and very deeply felt. They are acutely aware that the temperature soars and yet carry on travelling in oil-guzzling 'Four by Fours'. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Climate Change
Texasgreg on 28-05-2012
Climate Change
Mebe we should cork them cows, LOL. Don't know if it's just something you've been doing as of late or if it's your thing, but I like that you actually write on things of human concern, Luigi. I used to own a Hyundai elantra, but traded it in for a Chevy pickup a few years back for reasons of safety. Was traveling in H.O.V. lane in Dallas and ran over a mattress someone lost while moving, I suppose. The thing rolled up and raised my car off the ground where I had no traction. My exhaust began to catch the mattress on fire and I had to shut the car down, but we could not exit, (you would know why if you've ever seen downtown Dallas traffic). After several calls to 911, cops got there and protected us from traffic while a tow truck charged me $100 just to lift my car and remove the mattress. Did I mention that I had a car full of excited children? Arg! I will gladly eat a couple of them thar cows to save my truck. Seriously though, I thank you for writing on real concerns.

Greg πŸ™‚


Author's Reply:
I really like to write on impulse, Greg. If an idea comes into my head that is the spur to get me started on a poem. The subjects could be as disparate as someone mentioned in a newspaper or a figure from the past written about in a book. You could say there is no rhyme nor reason as to topics I use.
Your experience in the pickup must have been terrifying for the kids. Were they only excited? I would have been a screaming wreck. Talk about health and safety. You would have been safer with a cow.
Thanks for reading and commenting.

Luigi

stormwolf on 28-05-2012
Climate Change
Don't get me started on the Global Warming debate dear. I escaped the forum to soothe me nerves hahahaha
Great poem πŸ˜‰
Alison x

Author's Reply:
I noticed that you and your soapbox have abandoned the Forum arena after many heated debates and I am sure you have views on this topic too. I have described in few words one side of the argument but tried to show that opinions are divided.
Thanks for the comment.

Luigi x

cooky on 28-05-2012
Climate Change
Tell it to the yanks, they wont listen. A country locked into a vicious circle of consumerism and excess. The only escape for them is to go bankrupt, but we know that could never happen

Author's Reply:
Hi cooky. You are so right in saying that some people cannot be swayed from a life of consumerism and excessive use of resources, no matter how deleterious it is to the world at large.
Regards, Luigi.

amman on 29-05-2012
Climate Change
Hi Luigi. So many people have entrenched views in this debate.
The hypocrisy of many people is nicely expressed in the last 2 lines. Totally agree re. 4 wheel drives and most of those will never leave the tarmac.
Cheers

Author's Reply:
Hi amman. It isn't easy for some who have fixed ideas to shift their position but even those who realise the seriousness of the situation don't always act in an appropriate manner to alleviate the problem.
Best, Luigi.

Andrea on 29-05-2012
Climate Change
I always try to do my bit (careful with water, electricity, no car, recycle etc), but have a sneaky suspicion that when man is gone (not too far off, the way things are going) nature will find a way to thoroughly recuperate. Bit like the irrepressible 'weeds' (which I like) poking themselves up through the paving stones in my garden πŸ™‚

Good pome yet again, Luigi.

Author's Reply:
Dear Andrea, you are spot on: men seem to do their utmost to self-destruct in more ways than one (wars, pollution, etc.) and Nature gives them a helping hand (earthquakes, tsunami). Nuff said.
Thanks for your feedback.

Luigi x

Romany on 02-06-2012
Climate Change
A subject close to my heart and though I really do try hard, I know I am as guilty as everyone else - though I have never denied it is man's fault, because I believe that at least in part, it is!

Well said Luigi.

Romany.

Author's Reply:
We are all guilty to a certain extent, Sue, in not putting into practice all that we preach. It will take time to sink in but time is a rare commodity.

Luigi x


Waiting At The Gate (posted on: 25-05-12)
My entry to this week's Forum challenge. The word was WAITING.

You may say that I'm naοve but I wanted to believe she would meet me at eight by the main station's gate. She had to travel from Dover once the musical was over. I was trusting she would come but maybe I had been dumb; she was such a clever bird that I took her at her word. In my bed she'd been supine when she promised to be mine. But her face began to blush and she asked why the rush. Then she said, 'My dear friend let us wait till the weekend. Perhaps now you ought to know that I'm a dancer in a show and I'll go to any length to preserve my body strength.' 'Do not think that I'm cranky but I wish no hanky-panky, not today at any rate, be a good boy and just wait.' At midnight I lost my cool, I had been taken for a fool: the last train came and went and it was a non-event. Strike the iron while it's hot is a saying I forgot. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Waiting At The Gate
Andrea on 25-05-2012
Waiting At The Gate
Hahaha, poor, frustrated Luigi πŸ™‚ Good chuckle this gave me.

Author's Reply:
Oh, I see. Laughing at my misfortune now! Don't worry Andrea, I am very resilient.

Luigi x

sunken on 25-05-2012
Waiting At The Gate
Lol. You're a class act, Mr. Luigi. I had to look the word 'supine' up on account of me being none-too-clever. I don't believe for one moment that any woman has ever taken you for a fool. I can overlook this on the grounds of poetic licence though. Don't forget to renew said licence by the way. I forgot last year and got a right dressing down from the dept of poets. Do you know their final notice statements don't even rhyme. It's a disgrace. Excellent piece, my good man. Made me smile.

s
u
n
k
e
n



Author's Reply:
Dear Mr. Sunken, to tell you the truth I was going to say that she was lying on her back (invitingly) but thought it was too vulgar, then I decided to show off and use the word 'supine'.
You'd be surprised how many times those devious, cunning women have made a fool of me. They call it a learning curve; in my case it was almost a complete circle. Unlucky or plain stupid? Delete as appropriate.
I have no problem in renewing my poetic licence, it costs nothing for people over seventy.
I am glad that this made you smile. I am told that the Greeks have nothing to smile about, but that is another matter.
Cheers.

stormwolf on 25-05-2012
Waiting At The Gate
well, ye'll ken next time as they say up north πŸ˜‰
Alison x

Author's Reply:
You can't teach your gran to suck eggs, dear Alison. I learnt my lesson long time ago. Once bitten twice shy.
But thanks for the advice.

Luigi x

Bradene on 25-05-2012
Waiting At The Gate
Poor man, a sorry tale. Only you could tell the story so well and so amusingly too. Well done Luigi. Valx

Author's Reply:
Dear Val, men are just as vulnerable to romantic disappointments as women. This was just a case. I am sure he didn't see the funny side at the time but it served him right for being so naΓ―ve.
We, impartial observers, are allowed to be amused by such antics.
Thanks for reading and commenting.

Luigi x

Romany on 26-05-2012
Waiting At The Gate
Left kicking himself and cooling his heels all at once - a good trick if you can do it! Great work as always.

Romany.

Author's Reply:
Hi Sue, what can I say. Sometimes we have to suffer what Hamlet calls "The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune" but in this case the misfortune is somewhat self-inflicted. Duh!
Thanks for stopping by. Let's hope your visit is more permanent.

Luigi x


Frederick The Great (posted on: 21-05-12)
A man of action, in every sense.

We know him as Frederick of Prussia who went down in history as the Great. He wasn't just a king or a military man but also a poet who engaged in debate with the French philosopher Voltaire, who had become Frederick's pen friend. Eventually the Frenchman upset him; they quarrelled, but made up in the end. He was brought up strictly by his dad who called him by the nickname Fritz. During his reign he fought many wars: against Austria he carried out a blitz crashing the enemy and triumphing despite the fact he'd faced an alliance of several countries which included Russia, Saxony, Sweden and France. In peacetime he lived at Sans Souci - which means to be without a care - a newly built palace in which he would entertain and look debonair. He was a gifted musician who played and composed music for the flute, hundred sonatas and four symphonies, an achievement that's beyond dispute. His father had made sure he got wed, that he followed the usual convention, but he only socialised with male friends which revealed Frederick's inclination. The fact that he did not produce an heir is the proof, some commentators say, that he wasn't interested in women and that he had, therefore, to be gay. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Frederick The Great
cooky on 21-05-2012
Frederick The Great
a monday morning history lesson. I like this it has a flow and is very good

Author's Reply:
Yes cooky, it looks as if Mondays are for history lessons. This week there are three poems with historical content.
Mine is only a potted version but I hope it gives the flavour of the man. Pleased you liked it. Thanks.

Andrea on 21-05-2012
Frederick The Great
Fascinating, Luigi. Can't say I knew much about the ol' Fred -I'll have to bone up on him now πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Can't say I knew much either. My interested was aroused when I heard that he was a renowned composer.
My curiosity took over then.

Luigi x

RoyBateman on 21-05-2012
Frederick The Great
Wasn't he the chap famous for designing fireplaces? Oh, sorry, that was Frederick the Grate. Anyway, the real chappie was certainly an unusual sort, combining a gift for warmaking that later generations turned into the national sport with an undoubted musical talent. An odd mix, eh? And that penchant for whacking neighbours has meant that modern-day Germany includes few of Frederick's old territories, which is somewhat ironic. As cooky says, a history lesson but done with your usual wit and flair and thus elevated far above the norm.

Author's Reply:
You always come up with some gem, Roy. Frederick the Grate: I wish I had thought of that myself. But the piece would have taken a quite different direction.
It seems odd that someone who had a sensitive soul to play and compose music could also be a warmonger,
then Nero comes to mind - playing while Rome burned - although his musical abilities were open to questions.
So perhaps the analogy is somewhat irrelevant. Thank you for mentioning wit and flair. Too kind.

Bradene on 21-05-2012
Frederick The Great
Good one Luigi, I'm not up on Russian History, sounds really interesting though. Well done again. Valx

Author's Reply:
All history interests me very much, Val, and I dip into its vast pool indiscriminately.
Thanks for the generous rating.

Luigi x

Romany on 22-05-2012
Frederick The Great
Interesting stuff. I seem to remember that you have written a few little ditties with an historical bent.

Romany.

Author's Reply:
You are not wrong Sue. In the past few months I have written many more: 'I, Catherine' (on Catherine the Great of Russia); 'The Mad Monk' (about Rasputin); 'The Witches of Pendle'; 'Boudica'; 'The Demon Barber' (about Sweeney Todd); etc.
I found history to be a rich source of inspiration both for prose writers and poets. Thanks for reading.

Luigi x

stormwolf on 22-05-2012
Frederick The Great
I always enjoy the way you pronounce facts in such a non-commital way that leaves the reader the chance to deduce their own opnions.
Brings things together.
Alison x

Author's Reply:
There is a saying that states that history is written by the victors. There is something in that. It is only when we remove the bias that we can form our own opinion. By presenting the mere facts we can hopefully have impartial views. Thanks for the comment, Alison.

Luigi x

amman on 23-05-2012
Frederick The Great
Hi Luigi. You present history with such 'gay' abandon, and in rhyme too. I googled F the G after reading this. He really was a man of contradictions. The father of modern Germany (Prussia that was) and a man with great artistic talents.
Thank you.

Author's Reply:
Hi amman. It was those artistic talents, especially in a military man, that intrigued me. The gayness nowadays doesn't make any waves but in his days it was considered a criminal act with the possibility of the death penalty.
Thanks for the comment and generous rating.

Capricorn on 24-05-2012
Frederick The Great
What a great history lesson! - and poetically it all flows beautifully.

Eira x

Author's Reply:
Hi Eira. Sorry for the tardy reply. I have been watching tennis, the French Open.
Thanks for your approbation.

Luigi x


Exchanging Words (posted on: 18-05-12)
My entry to this week's Forum challenge - slightly amended. The prompt was ALTERCATION.

Yes, we exchanged words but it wasn't an altercation. Not as such. Far too civilised for that. So we slung mud at each other with carefully chosen epithets and a posh accent. She didn't resort to crude nouns but didn't shy from using the euphemism 'Go forth and multiply'. Every insult was truly meant; I once called her a bitch, and she replied that it was rich coming from me, a mongrel born on the wrong side of a nobleman's bed. What hurt was not what she said but the way she said it, with relish. She was furious and hit hard and I felt that my reputation would crumble and perish. It was about time I played my card. I told her how beautiful she was when she got angry. She mellowed and was thrilled to bits when she suddenly noticed I was stroking her tits. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Exchanging Words
Bradene on 18-05-2012
Exchanging Words
Another Luigi special. Good one I think. And still no word for next wednesday!! However this is well done Luigi. Valx

Author's Reply:
Thanks Val. Kiss and make up; no better way for ending an argument.

Luigi x

Romany on 18-05-2012
Exchanging Words
Trust you to end it with that! Quintessential Luigi.

Romany.

Author's Reply:
Hi Sue. I always make a point of ending on a happy note. Mind you, that move could have backfired but worth the risk, I believe.
Thanks for reading and commenting.

Luigi x

stormwolf on 18-05-2012
Exchanging Words
I totally agree with the girls!
You sure know the way to placate a woman! πŸ˜‰
Alison x

Author's Reply:
It is called diplomacy, dear Alison. It takes years to master it.
Thanks for stopping by.

Luigi x

amman on 19-05-2012
Exchanging Words
Hello Luigi. This is right up there with your best. The denouement at the end is quite 'Sunkenesqe'. That's meant as a compliment.
Cheers

Author's Reply:
It is very flattering to be compared to the great Sunken and that is indeed a compliment for which I thank you, but I am bound to say that he is in a league of his own. Quite brilliant, in my opinion.
Cheers.

Andrea on 19-05-2012
Exchanging Words
Hahaha, nice one. And yep, a bit of tit-stroking will do it every time (well, most times).

Author's Reply:
A bloke has to try every trick; if it works well and good: mission accomplished, at a stroke.
Anyway, good to hear you approve. Thanks Andrea.

Luigi x

Capricorn on 20-05-2012
Exchanging Words
Oh this is great, Luigi - I really love it! You've given me a giggle again!
Funny - my husband always says I look beautiful when I get angry - but I've got him sussed out now! Haha!
Eira x

Author's Reply:
Men will say anything to get out of an awkward situation but a shrewd woman can suss them out very easily.
It is a game we all play but if it leads to a satisfactory outcome, it is worth the candle.
Dear Eira, you really have made my day by choosing this poem as a 'hot story' as well as selecting me as one of your favourite authors. Bless you.
No wonder that the sun is shining on this Monday morning.

Luigi x


The Cherry Orchard (posted on: 14-05-12)
A sought-after specimen.

When he uttered those words: 'Come into the garden, Maud' she saw it as a bold move and was inclined to applaud. She wasn't too apprehensive yet felt a bit of tension. She knew what his plan was, she had guessed his intention. 'He will smell the roses or maybe pick some berry', she thought, but knew all along that he was after her cherry. She had to hang on to her prize, the best one in her orchard. Though it was small in size to lose it would be hard. And it would be a great pity; she had nurtured every bush and tree since they first budded. Could she withstand the push? She pondered and decided that she would no longer quibble if they could share the fruit and she got more than a nibble. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for The Cherry Orchard
amman on 14-05-2012
The Cherry Orchard
Humorous and clever play on words. Great title.
Cheers

Author's Reply:
Cheers amman. Glad you saw the humour and enjoyed it. Thanks.

Andrea on 14-05-2012
The Cherry Orchard
Hahaha - lovely! Long time since I lost my cherry, I can tell you!

I enjoyed it so much, though, that I made it my life's work to lose it as often as possible πŸ™‚ AND my third name's Maude...

Author's Reply:
Are you going to come into my garden, Maude? Now I know who to dedicate this to.

Luigi x

Bradene on 14-05-2012
The Cherry Orchard
Lol, lovely monday morning giggle pure Luigi. Well done Valx

Author's Reply:
Giggle away Val, it's good for the soul.

Luigi x

cooky on 14-05-2012
The Cherry Orchard
Love the play on words. I like this

Author's Reply:
Nice to hear from you, cooky. Thank you.

chant_z on 15-05-2012
The Cherry Orchard
Very neat toying. I was smiling all along the piece. I don't rate as principle but it would probably be high

Author's Reply:
I see that you appreciated my tongue-in-cheek poem. Many thanks for reading it and commenting.

Capricorn on 20-05-2012
The Cherry Orchard
Haha! Great play on words Luigi. I enjoyed the giggle!
Eira x

Author's Reply:
A suitable compromise and mutually beneficial, don't you think? I am glad that you enjoyed this giggle-inducing piece. Thanks.

Luigi x


The Mad Monk (posted on: 11-05-12)
Rasputin: saint or sinner?.

Some said he was the best thing under the sun, others that he was a monster; a sexual predator whose debauchery included the raping of a nun. Variously described as a mad monk or a mystic he wasn't always as holy as he should've been but to say that he was corrupt is too simplistic. When the tsarina and the tsar were in turmoil -she, worried about the health of her ailing son, he, of enemy troops fighting on Russian soil- they summoned Rasputin to bring salvation not only to the boy affected by haemophilia but to the monarchy and the entire nation. Controversially, he became involved in intrigue exercising undue domination over the royals although, by birth, he was out of their league. Political reasons dictated that he should die but who fired the fatal shot remains unclear: it is rumoured that it was a British spy. This tantalising episode remains a mystery, the autopsy report vanished without trace and there is a lacuna in modern history. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for The Mad Monk
amman on 12-05-2012
The Mad Monk
Thanks for the history lesson. I reckon he was a bit of both, but was always destined for a sticky end. Liked the poem; great rhyming. Wish I could do that.
Cheers

Author's Reply:
Look amman, in my previous life, i.e. before I retired, I was an accountant who never dreamed that one day I would write verses. It doesn't really matters if poetry rhymes as long as it has something to say. It seems to me that you are doing pretty well with your input. Keep it up.
Grateful to you for following my work. Greatly appreciated.

Bradene on 12-05-2012
The Mad Monk
Intriguing Story Luigi this Rasputin always facsinated me, and always meant to find out more about him, but sadly I never really got around to it. Something to think of in the future. Thanks for this insight. Valx

Author's Reply:
Hi Val. I told you that history was a great source of inspiration. The more I dig the more I come up with interesting snippets that can be turned into verse. You put the formula to good effect recently with your poems on the Virgin Queen. Rasputin's story has all the elements of a detective thriller.
Thanks for stopping by.

Luigi x

PS Don't forget the Musical clue.

sunken on 12-05-2012
The Mad Monk
Oh no. You've done it now. I've got a song by Boney M in stuck in my head. Lady gaga recently ripped it off. The title will come to me soon.... Ra, ra... Ras... No. It's no good. It escapes me. Good to have some background into the song though. Ra... Ra... Rasputin! Knew I'd get there in the end. You really should get these history pieces together in a book. You could flog them to schools. Nice work, Mr. Luigi. Nice work indeed.

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Author's Reply:
Mr. Sunken, hello and welcome. I had completely forgotten that there was a song of that name: thanks for reminding me. I am not into Lady Gaga; should I be? Anyway the appearance of this piece is purely coincidental. You must have read my mind, I too have considered the possibility of assembling historical events in poetic form in a single book. Have you read my previous effort 'I, Catherine'? It describes the naughty side of Catherine the Great of Russia. Do you think it would fit in? I am tempted to say that many did. There, I said it! Thanks to you and Bernard for augmenting the hit list.

stormwolf on 12-05-2012
The Mad Monk
He was a bugger to kill by all accounts.
Love your laid back assessment of such things.
You have a very individual style,

Luigi

Alison x

Author's Reply:
Yes, apparently several attempts were made before he succumbed.
In describing such events I like to play the role of an observer.
I believe that we are all individuals when it comes to style and our way of expressing ourselves is unique.
One can only gauge from readers' reaction whether it appeals.
Thank you kindly for your wee note.

Luigi x

Andrea on 13-05-2012
The Mad Monk
I've always been fascinated by Rasputin. He came to a nasty end too. It was also rumoured that he was the Tsarina's lover, but I somehow doubt it. Nicely done, Luigi, interesting piece.

Author's Reply:
As you say, a fascinating character. There is no evidence that there was anything sexual between the two but I wouldn't put it past him. He was known to have used hypnosis so I wouldn't be surprised if I were told that he had 'relaxed' the tsarina and had his wicked ways with her.

Luigi x

Capricorn on 13-05-2012
The Mad Monk
Hi Luigi

I like this for 2 reasons - the great historic aspect and your rhyming verses. I love the way you've sandwiched a non rhyming line between 2 rhyming lines. Great idea!
Eira x

Author's Reply:
Thanks, Eira. Chuffed this met with your approval.

Luigi x


I, Catherine (posted on: 07-05-12)
A lustful Empress.

I, Catherine the Great - that's what they call me - am rather impatient and I can hardly wait for my next paramour. I may be in my sixties but my libido is young. As young as my new lover, the charming Prince Zubov. I wonder how he compares with Count Grigory Orlov or the others I've had. To give them their due none of them was bad and there were quite a few. While my legs are wide open, my ears are tightly shut to those who persevere in calling me a slut. Even though I admit that when it comes to sex I like it quite a bit, I must deny that slander, which I found too coarse, that on one occasion I coupled with a horse. I had so many untruths told about me and my friends that I begin to doubt whether they'll ever end. Yet I remain hopeful that they will peter out. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for I, Catherine
Bradene on 07-05-2012
I, Catherine
I din't know a lot about Russian history but I have heard of the proclivities of Catherine the Great. Nicely done Luigi. Valx

Author's Reply:
Hi Val. As you can see I am following in your footsteps and dipping into history for inspiration. Look out for another snippet on Friday.
Although what has been said about Catherine's sexual mores is true, a lot has also been exaggerated by her enemies. It seems that she was truly fond of all her lovers and remained in friendly terms with her former ones. I believe it was also a way of forging alliances to gain and retain power after her husband, Peter, was got rid of. Talking of which, did you notice my pun in the last line?
Grateful to you for your comment.

Luigi x


Ambitions (posted on: 04-05-12)
...and castles in the air.

I didn't want to become a fireman, a train driver, or a neurosurgeon, like the rest. I wished to be Beau Geste. Having read Wren's novel and seen Wellman's film, to follow in Beau's footsteps and join the Foreign Legion seemed the thing to do. To keep stiff upper lips, and fight against the odds, would be a fine gesture. So did I engage in combat with a sadistic sergeant or repel an attack by the fierce Tuaregs? Did I ever endure the desert's harsh condition? Yes, lots of times: in my imagination. Like many other childhood dreams, this ambition remained unfulfilled. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Ambitions
Andrea on 06-05-2012
Ambitions
Ooooh, I say, Luigi, the Beau Geste trilogy (Beau Sabreur and Beau Ideal) were among my favourite books as a kid. Marvellous escapism! Blimey, your pome took me back.

Author's Reply:
Hi Andrea, you must have read my mind: I have just posted a question on the Forum asking why the latest poetry input had been largely ignored and then your comment appeared. I am relieved.
The problem with these reminiscences is that they tend to reveal one's age. Mine, however is an open secret: 77 and counting.
Thanks for your welcome comment and rating.

Luigi x

Bradene on 06-05-2012
Ambitions
Took me back as well, nice poem Luigi. Valx

Author's Reply:
There is nothing like nostalgia to forget all there is wrong in the world nowadays, although we have a rosier picture of the past and tend to ignore the problems that have existed since time immemorial.
Still it is nice to recall happy moments. Thanks as usual for reading and commenting.

Luigi x

Andrea on 06-05-2012
Ambitions
Who cares, Luigi? You're as old as you feel. Me, I'm 25, but feel 80 πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:

amman on 06-05-2012
Ambitions
Hi Luigi. I really like this; quite up to your usual high standards. My fantasy was to be a golf pro. Hard to believe your stated age tho'.
Regards

Author's Reply:
Thanks for your kind words, amman. I would never have made it as a golf player, I am absolutely useless even at mini-golf.
As for age, the most important thing is to have good health.

Best, Luigi.

stormwolf on 07-05-2012
Ambitions
If I were you Luigi, I would stop the counting. What's the point? πŸ˜‰
A lovely excursion down the memory lane that could be shared with a few tweaks by both sexes. I could have been so many things...ah well
Alison x

Author's Reply:
You are so right, Alison, what's the point? We can't stop Father Time. Mind you, I shall start worrying when I stop counting the notches on the bedpost.
I am sure that both boys and girls have childhood dreams that are never realised and each have their particular fantasies, irrespective of their gender. I have told you mine, now tell me yours.

Luigi x


Missing (posted on: 30-04-12)
Vanished into thin air.

What started as a discussion developed into an argument. They both were obstinate and neither would relent. Very soon tempers flared: into the night one went; it was a drastic measure to show her discontent. Because she was vulnerable meandering in the street, the constabulary, rightly, put more cops on the beat. They got the sniffer dogs and searched every place but she had just vanished, of her there was no trace. If only one had uttered that fateful word -sorry - there would no be anxiety, no one would have to worry. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Missing
amman on 01-05-2012
Missing
Hi Luigi
I don't know why nobody else has commented yet.
A cautionary commentary on stubbornness and consequences. I liked this a lot.
Cheers

Author's Reply:
Hi amman. With a good crop of entries of the highest quality to vie with, it is easy to miss this cautionary tale.
I am grateful to you for retrieving it from the doldrums.

Best, Luigi.

Andrea on 01-05-2012
Missing
Sorry seems to be the hardest word, eh? So many 'ifs' in life, aren't there, Luigi?

I liked it too πŸ™‚

Here's a song for you...




Author's Reply:
Thanks for the comment and the song, Andrea.
How many times have we read of such an occurrence, where pride forced one to take actions that lead to unexpected consequences? This point was brought home to me by seeing an episode in that thriller I mentioned previously (The Bridge) in which a mother and a daughter fall out after an argument and she leaves home to wander in the streets, ignoring the threat of unforeseen dangers. I'll keep you informed on how she fares.

Luigi x

Bradene on 01-05-2012
Missing
Yes Sorry indeed, for missing this little gem right down here at the bottom. It's strange but the bottom is where I usually start to read at least. Well anyway I think this is a nicely crafted piece, but I would say there are always two sides to a story, however you put yours view so well. A smashing poem as ever. Vax

Author's Reply:
Hi Val. I have noticed that lately my pieces seem to slide towards the bottom of the list and consequently likely to be overlooked but I understand it is a random selection.
I agree entirely that there are always two sides to an argument and if both litigants didn't let their egos take over and instead compromised, things could be resolved more amicably without resorting to extreme measures. I thank you for your favourable review.

Luigi x

Bradene on 01-05-2012
Missing
On second read Luigi, it's plain you didn't give a (side) you just stated a fact. Sorry I got it wrong the first read, Not quite with it yet today. Yes this is better than an 8 it's a 9 at least forgive me. Valx

Author's Reply:
Quite so, young Val. Don't worry, at times I have to read a piece several times before I understand the gist.

Love, Luigi x

stormwolf on 01-05-2012
Missing
I thought it was about Shy and me on the forum to start with πŸ˜‰
Interesting tale of things spiralling out of control.
Alison x

Author's Reply:
If there is anyone missing from the Forum, is me. I very rarely make an appearance there, apart from the musical cryptic clue game.
Thanks for taking a peek at this.

Luigi x

Texasgreg on 26-05-2012
Missing
I like stuff with a message...never know who will read and learn from it. You did it justice, Luigi.

Greg πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Many thanks Greg, much appreciated.


I Watched A Thriller On T.V. Last Night (posted on: 27-04-12)
A detective hot on the trail.

I watched a thriller on T.V. last night unsuitable for those who like romance. The acting was sleek, the dialogue tight, the plot convoluted and full of nuance. Viewers might say that it was defective, that the thread was far too complex plus the fact that the female detective seemed to indulge in some casual sex. One may query its relevance to the story but the vision of naked writhing limbs it's the sight in which certain men glory especially those who have erotic whims. In these films the heroine can't be chaste she has to show she's tougher than a man, but this may not be to everyone's taste; some people could be calling for a ban. There are eight more episodes in the can, we'll have to see if the viewers approve but judging by the way the first began I doubt that her behaviour will improve. As for me, I try not to be judgemental: those scenes may be crucial to the plot, in fact I think they may be fundamental: to prove it I shall have to watch the lot. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for I Watched A Thriller On T.V. Last Night
Andrea on 27-04-2012
I Watched A Thriller On T.V. Last Night
Ooooh, I love thrillers! What's it called? Currently watching both Law and Order and Prime Suspect, both with ladies in charge!

I do get a bit bored if there's too much funny biz though ) I just want them to get on with it and decapitate someone!

Ps. Have you seen Dexter?

Author's Reply:
It is a Swedish/Danish production called 'The Bridge' shown on BBC4 on Saturdays from 9.00 pm.
There is more than decapitation: a body cut through the middle but with the two halves belonging to different victims. And that's just for starters!
Dexter does not seem to ring any bells with me, so the answer is probably no.

Luigi x

Bradene on 29-04-2012
I Watched A Thriller On T.V. Last Night
Well naturally, we'd all expect you to watch it Luigi. I haven't watched it because isn't that the one with the sub titles? Mac watches it and says it is good. As for me if I am going to read i'd rather it be a book. Good poem though. Valx

Author's Reply:
I didn't watch it for the sex, Val, that was an added extra. BBC4 very often broadcasts foreign serials with subtitles. I have seen Swedish ones, French and Italians and enjoyed them all. The current one is very good although I am confused by the many characters who are obviously connected but I can't see how at the moment. No doubt the jigsaw will be completed by the end of the series. Incidentally there was no repeat of the sexy scene in the third episode. The female detective continues to behave oddly in my opinion. I look forward to developments.
Thanks for your comment.

Luigi x

ChairmanWow on 29-04-2012
I Watched A Thriller On T.V. Last Night
Great TV show-review poem, Luigi. Of course it isn't broadcast here in Arizona.

Ralph

Author's Reply:
I appreciate that Ralph but there are detective stories on American television on similar lines. How liberal they are on showing sex I wouldn't know as the ones I see over here - CSI, NCIS, Law and Order - are fairly sanitised.
Thanks for reding this.


A Burgeoning Romance (posted on: 23-04-12)
A mynah setback.

Robert was a widower, Julia a divorcee who had found it hard to part from her husband, an inveterate drunkard. They had met twice before; they'd gone to the cinema and to a country dance. It truly resembled a burgeoning romance. This meeting was their third. She lived in an apartment and had a mynah bird that could mimic her accent and every single word. This time she was unresponsive and would not tell him why she kept him at a distance. Robert was afraid it might mean goodbye. Until now she'd been keen but had altered her stance; could it be that her ex had returned to the scene? Right then the mynah bird repeated every word it had recently heard: 'Of course I love you darling. I believe you have changed: I'll give you another chance.' © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for A Burgeoning Romance
RoyBateman on 23-04-2012
A Burgeoning Romance
"Mynah setback" - brilliant! I love it. If the bird goes on sticking its beak in like this, I can see it ending up on somebody's plate. That's if you can eat 'em, of course. I suppose that might be the mynah's last ever comment: "Two hours at gas mark five!" Very wry bit of humour, Luigi - I can just see their faces.

Author's Reply:
Hi Roy, thanks for looking in. It looks as if we are the only ones to see the joke. We could envisage the bird being flattened by a frying pan and then we would have 'A flat mynah'. Or else we could talk of its owner who was ringing for a taxi but changed her mind and called the taxidermist. Endless possibilities that the other readers missed. Oh well, that's life.
Cheers.

Andrea on 24-04-2012
A Burgeoning Romance
I had a friend who had a mynah bird. Ghastly thing. It used to screech 'fuck off! fuck off!' (pardon French) as soon as you entered the room, and if you didn't oblige, it'd dive-bomb you.
Julia's avian friend doesn't sound much better, I must say. Strangulation would be too kind...


Author's Reply:
Oh, I say Andrea. I never had an encounter of the bird kind but your solution seems a bit drastic.Strangulation, aargh!

Luigi x

Alphadog1 on 24-04-2012
A Burgeoning Romance
@ Andrea... hahahaha sorry that had me laughing. I loved the poem Luigi. very clever.

Author's Reply:
I can visualise Andrea being dive-bombed by that bird; not a pretty sight I imagine.
Thanks for your comment, Alpha.

Best, Luigi.

ChairmanWow on 24-04-2012
A Burgeoning Romance
Good bird, saved the Robert a lot of problems. My brother had a parrot of some kind but when his girls let it out of the cage it would attack him but not the females of the household. He got rid of it.

Author's Reply:
Obviously a very jealous parrot; couldn't stand the competition. Getting rid of it was the best solution.
Thanks for reading this.

sunken on 25-04-2012
A Burgeoning Romance
I never realised mynah was spelt like that. I always thought it was minor. I have learned something, Luigi. Imagine that. I reckon they screech like fuck because they don't like being in cages. It does seem extremely cruel on the face of it to keep a bird caged. I actually have a bit of a phobia with them. I'd find it very hard to be in a room with one flapping around. Does that make me a wimp? It does doesn't it. Witty as ever, Luigi. Well done on the nib. Commiserations on the Bernard. He's actually had a bath by the way. Sniff him. I've used lynx Africa shower gel. He smells like me. Not sure that's a good thing to be frank. I'll shut up.

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Author's Reply:
I am with you, Mr. Sunken, regarding birds in captivity. They ought to be free to roam the sky. I made this point
in an old poem of mine (in 2003) entitled 'The Birdman of Alcatraz'. Not that anybody took any notice.
Glad to hear that Bernard had a bath but doesn't he think that smelling like a French poodle diminishes his macho image? I am not suggesting that the same applies to you but I know that dogs are particularly attached to their body odour. I better shut up too before saying something silly. I already have, haven't I?

Bradene on 25-04-2012
A Burgeoning Romance
Very funny Luigi. I'm with Andrea on this those birds are horrid, they really creep me out. Nice work though Valx

Author's Reply:
It must be a natural antipathy between women and birds, Val. Thanks for your feedback.

Luigi x

amman on 25-04-2012
A Burgeoning Romance
Looks like poor Robert got the bird in the end. Perhaps for the best. Very clever piece.
Cheers

Author's Reply:
Hi amman. Yes Robert definitely got the bird but not the one he wanted. Thanks for the comment.
Best, Luigi.

chant_z on 25-04-2012
A Burgeoning Romance
Strange company for sure. Wonderful write.

Author's Reply:
Yes, really a peculiar situation. Thanks for your comment chant_z.


The Witches of Pendle (posted on: 20-04-12)
Witch hunting in Lancashire, England, 400 years ago.

The year sixteen-twelve boded ill for the womenfolk of Pendle Hill. It culminated in a famous trial with many guilty pleas and no denial. A peddler incurred Alison's curse because he held on to his purse and refused to give her any pins. That was the beginning of her sins. She was the daughter of Liz Device whose relatives were not very nice. They practised devilry and trickery and yet accused others of witchery. John Law was the peddler's name and after the incantation he fell lame. To the magistrate Roger Nowell Alison admitted she had cast a spell but also denounced Anne Chattox as a witch known to spread the pox. Soon one accusation led to another and in the dock came grandmother, mother, one brother and one sister and the tales they told were sinister. But who sealed the fate of the family was one of their own, a young filly, a nine-year old girl called Jennet: her testimony sent them to the gibbet. The clerk of the Court, Thomas Pott recorded, for posterity, the lot. So now we don't have to delve in the archives of sixteen-twelve. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for The Witches of Pendle
orangedream on 20-04-2012
The Witches of Pendle
Very succinctly put, Luigi. A fascinating history this place has got, and I did visit there, a few years back now, so thank you for refreshing my memory on the details of its murky past.

Much enjoyed;-)

Tina x



Author's Reply:
There is a limit as to how much one can pack into a poem. My aim was to give a flavour of the event which might spark a greater interest and give people the incentive to further research the background.
You have an advantage over me as I never visited the place, I only read about it.
Glad you enjoyed it.

Luigi x

Andrea on 20-04-2012
The Witches of Pendle
Blimey, Luigi - off to WIKIPEDIA again! Great stuff...

Author's Reply:
That's the ticket, Andrea. This is only the bait to make you wanting more information. Thanks for reading and commenting.

Luigi x

Bradene on 20-04-2012
The Witches of Pendle
A terrible time to be a woman, they only had to upset the wrong person and it was curtains, declared a witch, it was difficult foe them to prove otherwise, especially if they were a little slow on the up take. A tale well told Luigi, one that mirrors thousands more accross Europe and early America. Well done. Valx

Author's Reply:
Indeed, dear Val, women have had a raw deal all throughout history and especially during the Dark Ages.
Anything that went wrong was blamed on them. Mind you warlocks didn't have an easy life either and often joined their female counterparts on the gallows.
Thanks for stopping by.

Luigi x

ChairmanWow on 20-04-2012
The Witches of Pendle
Well done. Timely pick for subject matter too. We still suffer from public trials that very close to accusations of witchcraft. In the USA unfortunates are tried in the media with 24/7 hit pieces.

Ralph

Author's Reply:
I agree Ralph. The treatment of the fair sex is discriminatory even in these enlightened days and it goes on all over the world.

Icequeen on 20-04-2012
The Witches of Pendle
I very much enjoyed this poem, especially because I am from Pendle myself so I was raised on the legends of the Pendle Witches. In fact my husband, known as Kingtut on this site, is related to Alice Nutter, one of the witches. It was an excellent poem with a lovely rhythm and you have obviously done your research into the legends. It still makes me angry what was done to those poor women. Good work.

Author's Reply:
Hi Icequeen. Nice meeting you and hearing that you have enjoyed the poem even though it has brought to mind the injustice that was done to those poor women in Pendle and throughout England in those dark days.
It was interesting to learn that your husband is related to one of the victims. I have just commented on one of his poems. I have also noted that you have posted the beginning of a novel. I concentrate on poetry and rarely read prose but what put me off was the length of your entry (4,000 words or thereabout). May I suggest that you post smaller chunks? In my opinion it would attract more readers with the chance of greater feedback.
Good luck with your endeavour.

Icequeen on 21-04-2012
The Witches of Pendle
Hi Ionicus. I haven't posted any novel excerpts on this site, just one short story. Is it someone with a similar username?

Author's Reply:
Oh, dear me, I am getting senile. I confused you with another newcomer with a different pseudonym from yours so there is no excuse for the mistake. Accept my apologies and to make amends I shall read your short story.

Best, Luigi.

amman on 22-04-2012
The Witches of Pendle
Thanks for the history lesson so cleverly penned. Like Andrea, I'm off to read more on Wikipedia. Pretty barbaric "justice" handed out in the dark and middle ages in Britain.
Regards

Author's Reply:
Thanks for your kind remark, amman. It is amazing that superstition could create havoc and even death among an ignorant population who sometimes brought misery to themselves by accusing each other of witchcraft. It is intriguing to read and try to understand the context in which this episodes occurred.

Best, Luigi

sunken on 22-04-2012
The Witches of Pendle
Your work should be studied in schools up and down the country, Mr. Luigi. I may have learned more if history had rhymed. Can you do anything with algebra? Make that rhyme and you're onto a winner. To be frank, I can't see any rhyme or reason to it. Did ya see what I did there? Luigi? Hello? Well done on th nib.

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Author's Reply:
Hi sunken. History was always my favourite subject unlike geography even though I could find plenty of rhymes for that.
The nearest I can get to algebra is vertebra but then you have to study both maths and anatomy. It is hard work but the naming of the parts can be fun.
I could see what you did with 'I can't see any rhyme or reason to it': very witty. But then your witticism is known all along the length (and presumably the width) of Britain.
My heartfelt thanks to you and Bernard.

Luigi


From Putney To Mortlake (posted on: 09-04-12)
The 2012 boat race between Oxford and Cambridge and its dramatic finale.

For want of an oar Oxford was beat. The race this year wasn't so neat: it had to be stopped because a hazard popped up in the river. It was seen by the steward as the two boats were gaining speed with the Dark Blues just about in the lead. It was a protester who dived in the water and seemed unconcerned - like a lamb to the slaughter. He was grinning inanely as if he was thrilled, unaware perhaps he could have been killed. Was promptly removed so the race could restart. The crews were keyed up and keen to take part. So much so that Oxford collided with Cambridge but it was their own boat that suffered the damage. The blade of an oar was sheared in the clash; their hopes were dashed and defeat was harsh. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for From Putney To Mortlake
Andrea on 09-04-2012
From Putney To Mortlake
Silly bloke. I was reading an article about him yesterday, seems he's something of an oddball.

Nice, topical piece, Luigi.

Author's Reply:
He's bonkers if you ask me. Fancy risking his life like that and for what? I am told he was protesting about elitism.
It would have been interesting to see how close the race might have been if nothing had happened.

Luigi x

ChairmanWow on 13-04-2012
From Putney To Mortlake
Just another killjoy, if you ask me. Poem has the right slightly humorous if annoyed tone for the subject matter.

Ralph

Author's Reply:
There is always one to spoil the fun, Ralph.
This was written soon after the race ended; it was an instant inspiration and lent itself to be made into a doggerel. Thanks for reading.

Luigi


Popcorn and Scruples (posted on: 06-04-12)
My entry to this week's challenge - on the theme of POPCORN.

The film was yet to start but he had nearly finished his tub of popcorn. A frown on his forehead, his face was careworn. To have chosen the 'Rex' seemed to be the main worry, flicks that were notorious for showing explicit sex; he hoped he'd not be sorry. He considered with scorn the prospect of viewing a load of hard porn. The alternative would be to avoid all that palaver, and watch a DVD, a nice romantic story that he had just acquired. It had the attractive title: 'Lady Chatterley's lover.' © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Popcorn and Scruples
Bradene on 06-04-2012
Popcorn and Scruples
Good effort Luigi. Valx

Author's Reply:
You are right Val, it was really an effort to find a suitable topic for the word. Anyway I was able to put pen to paper and decided to post it on the main site, warts and all. Thanks for reading.

Luigi x

Andrea on 06-04-2012
Popcorn and Scruples
Nice one, Luigi - always thought Lady Chat a bit over-rated, meself πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Do you know what, Andrea? I actually found it boring. I am not into D.H. Lawrence at all, I'm afraid.
Thanks for your support.

Luigi x

amman on 07-04-2012
Popcorn and Scruples
Enjoyed this. Agree with you about D H Lawrence. I had to study 'Sons and Lovers' at Uni. Even more boring than Lady C.
Regards

Author's Reply:
I know what you mean, amman. That author is difficult to digest at the best of times and having to dissect his literary work for study purposes can be quite overwhelming.
Glad you liked my modest effort which was written for fun. Thanks for reading it.

ChairmanWow on 07-04-2012
Popcorn and Scruples
Can't always trust a title. At least the popcorn was good. Fine sense of humor in this piece, as usual.

Ralph

Author's Reply:
Never trust a book by its cover, nor trust a poem by its title, Ralph. It can give the wrong impression. Here I used the word 'popcorn' to introduce the cinematic topic so, basically, the poem had nothing to do with popcorn but it was a device that enabled me to progress to the final line with its nuance. I remarked elsewhere that it was a fun piece to write and I am glad that you appreciated its humour for which I thank you.


Victor Ludorum (posted on: 26-03-12)
The annual University Challenge, broadcast by the BBC, culminated this year in a closely fought contest in which Manchester University prevailed over Pembroke College, Cambridge by 180 points to 135.

The universities that entered a team, in the beginning were all full of hope. Victory was their most fervent dream, we would discover how well they'd cope. There were four rounds before the final fiercely contested by many gladiators; a competition that's essentially seminal and also enjoyable for the spectators. One at a time the weak were defeated and the successful became full of pep. Every session was then completed and teams advanced to the next step. It didn't take long for us to register the skills of Cambridge, the opposition, but representing the city of Manchester our four lads proved a tough proposition. Luke with Michael, Tristan and Paul fought in the final against Pembroke; lifted the trophy after a long haul and that was really a masterstroke. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Victor Ludorum
Andrea on 26-03-2012
Victor Ludorum
Love University Challenge, but missed that one. Of course I can answer every question extensively and with great aplomb!
(Although me Latin's not so good :))

Lovely pome Luigi - needless to say I have Twatted you!

Author's Reply:
I too love that programme, Andrea. I am OK with most questions, including Latin, but science baffles me.
Thanks for twatting me, it should increase the readership.

Luigi x

stormwolf on 26-03-2012
Victor Ludorum
great to see the many ways you are stimulated to write Luigi.
Alison x

Author's Reply:
I am easily stimulated, Alison. Give me any interesting topic and I'll work something around it.

Luigi x

Bradene on 27-03-2012
Victor Ludorum
Neat piece of work Luigi. I used to love the programme during the Gascoigne years but this Paxman chap sets my teeth on edge. Well done to Manchester too.

Author's Reply:
I tend to agree about your assessment of Paxman but I concentrate on the students. I had to write something in support of Manchester University as I live 10 miles from the city.

Luigi x

RoyBateman on 29-03-2012
Victor Ludorum
Good to see someone tackling an unusual subject - but with your usual wit and flair, of course! I'm still addicted, though for the life of me I can't make out why the current knockout system is SO bloody complex, leading us to see the same teams time after time...it was much easier in the beginning, when simply everyone had a go. Mind you, there were only 44 universities back then. Here's a trivia question for you - who won the first series? I have a vested interest, you see...
Actually, I did once go to Granada in the audience and as some kind of vague reserve, though thank goodness I never got my fizzog on screen: I can still answer some questions that even the champions don't get, but nowadays even their knowledge of simple British geography and the like is breathtakingly poor. I recall wandering through the piled-up "Corrie" sets to get to the studio, wondering why they were so luridly painted. Years later, it was explained to me that these shades showed up well in black and white...
Lastly, though, mate - didn't the captain of the Manchester team get on your wick, with his girly giggles and childish behaviour? I nearly switched him off, despite my natural support for Manchester. Anyway, nice one!
ps That first winner was Leicester.

Author's Reply:
Hi Roy. Yes the new format is somewhat complicated, a bit like the repechage in rowing. I don't know if Manchester would have won the final as they had lost in an earlier heat - I didn't pay much attention.
When you asked who the winner of the first series was, and mentioned that you had a vested interested, I pricked up my ears and thought that we might have a champion in our midst. You let me down, Roy: you should have got your fizzog on the screen.
I too found myself answering a lot of questions that competitors didn't get but was also baffled by scientific ones - I am a literary man. The captain, Tristan was it?, annoyed me a bit but didn't spoil my enjoyment.
Cheers.

ChairmanWow on 29-03-2012
Victor Ludorum
Sounds like a quizz show. Have to admit i'm not familiar with the university challenges. Unfortunately here we have competitions where the winner is the dumbest when it comes to geography and other basic building blocks of knowledge. The rhymes are well done.

Ralph

Author's Reply:
Hi Ralph, here is what Wikipedia says:
"University Challenge is a British quiz programme that has aired since 1962. The format is based on the American show College Bowl, which ran on NBC radio from 1953 to 1957, and on NBC television from 1959 to 1970.
Produced by Granada Television and filmed at Granada Studios in Manchester since its inception, University Challenge aired for 913 episodes on ITV from 1962 to 1987, presented by quiz master Bamber Gascoigne. The BBC revived the programme in 1994 under quiz master Jeremy Paxman, transmitting it on BBC Two. Series 41 began on 4 July 2011."
So, as you can see, the show originated on your shores. Alas, we too have competitions where the dumbest people take part but the participants in University Challenge are bright and knowledgeable undergraduates.
Thanks for reading,
Luigi.

RKane on 29-03-2012
Victor Ludorum
Good on you Ionicus for highlighting the mostest university in the known universe. Probably. I feel a poem about rain coming on!

Author's Reply:
Hi RK. Not quite the mostest with 3 titles as opposed to Magdalen College, Oxford (4 titles) but the university of Manchester always enters strong teams.
As for your poem about rain I can already feel its raindrops falling on my head, so it must be imminent. Let's have it.

sunken on 01-04-2012
Victor Ludorum
Hello Luigi. Excellent use of rhyme and an unusual subject to boot. I've not watched said quiz in years. When I have I seldom get anything right. It would appear I'm universally challenged. Enjoyed the read. Good to hear Manchester coming up trumps too.

s
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shake until forgotten

Author's Reply:
Hi sunks. It surprises me that, given your encyclopidic knowledge displayed on UK Sunks iBlog, you consider yourself universally challenged. Who are you trying to kid? We know the truth. Reveal your true self.


Charon's Cargo (posted on: 19-03-12)
A journey through hell.

Charon crossed the river Styx to transport his human cargo: Dante and Virgil, the guide. Both the bards were in a fix; once they reached the other side who would pay the ferryman? We've no coin, they said, so sorry. Would they have to stay on shore for one hundred years or more? But they had no need to worry for everything was hunky dory: there was no fee for living souls who wished to see the underworld with a view to write a story. The vessel rocked in the swamp and the journey was pure hell. They had to endure the foetid air and had to inhale the putrid smell, wading through the muddy waters in which, immersed, the sullen stew as a punishment for their crime. Whilst a storm with violence blew, the icy rain fell all the time. In this place, where Satan reigns, sinners face their retribution; some are trapped in flaming tombs, others, guilty of sheer brutality, are in boiling blood and fire. On they went to the next circle that was even more cavernous. Here resided the blasphemers whose behaviour had been obscene. After a gruelling and tiring trek, which began to be monotonous, the pair escaped from the mire. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Charon's Cargo
Andrea on 19-03-2012
Charons Cargo
Good stuff Luigi! 'Orrible, dark visions!
Do you remember the series 'Who Pays The Ferryman', years ago?

Pssst, think 'hanky dory' should be 'hunky dory' πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Given the recent cry that the Divine Comedy should be banned from the schools' curriculum, I thought I'd re-visit that opus to see what could have sparked the controversy after 700 years. As a result I was inspired to write this poem.
That series that you mention, 'Who Pays The Ferryman', must have passed me by as I don't recollect it.
Thanks Andrea for correcting my mistake. B****y foreigner! (Me, that is).
Luigi x

sunken on 19-03-2012
Charons Cargo
Lol. I think I prefer hanky dory. Didn't that irritating French bloke write a song about not paying the ferry man 'till he gets you to the other side'. Chris De Beefburger! That's the fella. He did that lady in red bilge. Did you know that the average beef burger enthusiast will eat approx eight pubic hairs a year? Why fcuk he/she is storing their beefburgers in their pants is quite frankly beyond me and no mistake! I do like your poem by the way. It's just that I still haven't got the hang of commenting. Well done on the nib.

s
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Author's Reply:
Hello Mr. Sunken. The thing I like about you is that you enlighten me about facts of which I know nothing.
Did I know that that Beefburger chap was French? Of course not. Pubic hairs haven't crossed my lips but that could be because I don't eat burgers. I don't know how else it could occur. Why do you claim not to have got the hang of commenting when you are described as a Gold Commenter? Your message comes across loud and clear.

Bradene on 19-03-2012
Charons Cargo
Well done Luigi very good imagery, if a little grusome. Well done on the nib. Valx

Author's Reply:
We have to thank Dante for the gruesome images. I am only following the trend.
Thanks for looking in.

Luigi x

orangedream on 19-03-2012
Charons Cargo
Congrats on the nib, Luigi. Gorily gorgeous, I'd describe it as;-)

Tina xx

Author's Reply:
Thanks Tina. 'Gorily gorgeous': I like that.

Luigi xx

PS Used to be xxx. Are you going cool on me?

stormwolf on 20-03-2012
Charons Cargo
Makes me want to repent and repent again (to be on the safe) side. Congrats on the nib Luigi.
Your poetry is going down a storm! πŸ˜‰
Alison x

Author's Reply:
No, don't repent. Not just yet at any rate.
Think of the advantages of hell: you don't have to worry about the heating bills and with any luck you may even have mine and possibly Shy's company. Or do you reckon that is one punishment too many?

Luigi x

ChairmanWow on 20-03-2012
Charons Cargo
Your poem sings, Luigi. Yes, they want to get rid of that classic, along with many other classics. Interesting that the concept of Hell was already with the ancient Greeks, long before Christianity. Must be something to it.

Ralph

Author's Reply:
What can I say Ralph? Let's just hope that those barbarians won't ever rule our thoughts.
It isn't really surprising that the concept of Hades was ingrained in their culture if we consider the part that mythology played in their literature. Always a rich vein to draw from as Homer, Dante and Virgil discovered.
The Iliad, the Odyssey, the Divine Comedy and the Aeneid are in my opinion the pinnacles of classic literature.
Thanks for reading and commenting.

Cheers, Luigi.

Leila on 20-03-2012
Charons Cargo
Oh very nicely done Luigi you are on form here...Leila

Author's Reply:
Thank you kindly, Leila.

Luigi x


The Sounds Of Music (posted on: 16-03-12)
In response to the word ONOMATOPOEIA in this week's Forum challenge.

It was thanks to my dog's bark that I started this composing lark. I had some lyrics in my brain but for the life of me the refrain eluded me. I could hear the beat and my ears relished the treat. It went BOOM, BOOM, BOOM and it resonated in each room. But I was glad to have found that other more exciting sound: it came from behind a pouffe and went something like WOOF. I knew that it would be a pastoral though it wasn't as yet structural. It needed noise to make it work so for inspiration I pulled a cork, heard a lovely GLUG, GLUG and after that I felt rather snug. Then I realised I couldn't stop; I uncorked one more: it went POP. I sensed I was getting the knack and added an OINK and a QUACK, a BAA-BAA, a MOO and a MEOW. It was now the time to take a bow. I didn't want to make it too long, it was the right length for a song. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for The Sounds Of Music
orangedream on 16-03-2012
The Sounds Of Music
It sounds as if you had great fun with this, Luigi. A super-duper poem if ever I read one;-)

Tina

Author's Reply:
I always have great fun writing these silly ditties, Tina. If they raise a smile I am more than satisfied.
Nice to hear from you.

Luigi x

stormwolf on 16-03-2012
The Sounds Of Music
hahaha bravo! That made me laugh. The vino had a good effect, no?
Alison x

Author's Reply:
The vino always makes me perk up, Alison. Mind you it has to be fruity.

Luigi x

Andrea on 16-03-2012
The Sounds Of Music
Made me chuckle, Luigi. That challenge defeated me, so kudos to you! The vino'll do it every time πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
How could I not take note of the wise Omar's words:
"A Book of Verses underneath the Bough,
A Jug of Wine, a Loaf of Bread--and Thou..."
I make it my business to uncork the Muse at every possible occasion
Cheers.

Luigi x


Arthur (posted on: 09-03-12)
A biographical sketch of Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle.

Of the many writers who walked on English soil one name springs to mind, that of Conan Doyle. He was the creator of a sleuth, Sherlock Holmes, whose puzzling cases filled several tomes. He killed off his creation on the Falls of Reichenbach but, by public demand, he had to bring him back. He was also a doctor who, as such, went to sea; he had a passion for cricket and played for the MCC. Bowled out W. G. Grace, which wasn't a mean feat; indulged in many sports, being a keen athlete. He nursed a sick wife for over a decade, he suffered setbacks and yet was not afraid. He had indeed a mistress but did abstain from sex as a matter of honour and a guilt complex. Then his beloved spouse succumbed to her malady enabling the couple to fulfil their destiny. I was surprised to learn that this man so formal, in fact a man of science, believed in paranormal. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Arthur
Andrea on 09-03-2012
Arthur
As a kid, Conan Doyle just about my favourite author. And, as you mention, seriously into the paranormal. He promised all his friends (they used to hold regular seances) that after his 'death' he'd come back and speak to them, so they'd know there was life 'on the other side'. Far as I know, no-one ever did hear from him after his demise. Have you been watching the new series with Cumberpatch? I thought it was brilliant, which is odd, me being such a purist an' all πŸ˜‰

Great pome, Luigi - how informative you are!

Author's Reply:
He was indeed an interesting character and it would take more than a brief poem to recount all his exploits.
It is ironical that he is remembered chiefly for Sherlock Holmes as he wanted to be considered a 'serious' writer and he produced a lot of other literature.
I have watched some episodes of the new series which is very innovative and enjoyable although I have to admit that I was sometimes confused by the plot.
Thanks, Andrea, for taking the time to read and comment.

Luigi x

ChairmanWow on 09-03-2012
Arthur
Loved the S. H. stories. Also enjoyed "The Lost World." Nice tribute to the author who gave us the world's greatest detective.

Ralph

Author's Reply:
Hi Ralph, I too enjoyed the adventures of Sherlock Holmes and his mortal enemy Moriarty. It was a matter of regret to Conan Doyle that he was only famous for those novels and why he tried to kill off his hero. He lived a varied life being an adventurer, a sportsman - he played cricket, golf and he boxed - in addition to being a scientist and a writer.

Regards, Luigi

Bradene on 10-03-2012
Arthur
Really smashing story of Conan Doyle I knew most things you mention in your piece but I didn't know about his sick wife, sounds like he was an honerable man. Well done Luigi. Valx

Author's Reply:
Hi Val. He was an extraordinary man and very devoted to his wife who died of tuberculosis after a long illness.
He had such respect for her that, as he could not have a conjugal relationship, he decided to remain celibate while she was alive even though he was seeing Jean Leckie who eventually he married.
Thanks for reading.

Luigi x

RoyBateman on 11-03-2012
Arthur
Yes, Luigi, clearly C-D is a huge favourite, and why not? He may have wanted to be a serious author, but he created one of the greatest fictional characters of all...so much so that I bet most folk worldwide believe he actually existed. I'm pretty sure that SH is the character most depicted in films/TV productions worldwide - his only rival is a certain JC, but he wasn't actually depicted until around the fifties out of respect for people's religious sensitivities.
Personally, I reckon that Basil Rathbone looked and acted the part to perfection, and it's pity that his outings were in US B-pictures, and updated to the 1940s to boot. Jeremy Brett's Granada series were possibly the most accurate, but rather ruined by his increasingly manic behaviour. (Which was, I believe, quite genuine...) Can't say I enjoyed the current reincarnation, though The Boss did...again, Benedict Cumberbatch is just too OTT. Biggest problem was the wimpy, laughable Moriarty - not my idea of a criminal mastermind! Anyway, good read as always and you've got us all talking: can't be a bad thing.
Oh, just thought - years ago I applied for a job with the then Abbey National BS in London - their headquarters on Baker St is/was where 221B would have been had it existed, and they used to get all the worldwide post for Sherlock Holmes...amazingly, they paid people to answer it, too, and there was a hell of a lot. Interesting? No, thought not...

Author's Reply:
Hi Roy. JC? The only one that I found to fit those initials was Julius Caesar but then I am not sensitive to religions. He seems to have got quite a bit of exposure by our Willie - Et tu brute? - but wasn't known to turn the other cheek.
You are quite right, Basil Rathbone WAS Sherlock Holmes and it is a pity that he wasn't given prominence.
The current portrayal by Cumberbatch, while introducing innovation, is rather OTT.
Your information about 221b Baker Street and the Abbey National is one of those snippets that comes under
'Not many people know that' but fascinating nonetheless.


Perils Of The Sea (posted on: 02-03-12)
Scylla and Charybdis

I have been interested in cartography since I learnt about the mappae mundi. I don't have to rely on the oceanography as I am not a navigator or an explorer so the inexact contours don't bother me. I love medieval maps because of art: the sinuous serpents and other monsters drawn on the sides of papyrus charts, -with the eerie legend 'Here be dragons' to warn travellers of hazards lurking- are aesthetically pleasing to the eye . I can envisage the ancient mariner consulting the illustrated parchments to chart a safe course and try to avoid the terra pericolosa, marked in red, or the unexplored land, terra incognita. But one additional peril wasn't charted: the sirens' enticing song that led sailors to their destruction on jagged rocks. Voyagers like Orpheus and Odysseus were tempted but overcame the lure. It took the former a lot of cunning, and the latter great courage, to endure the mischief of Persephone's playmates. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Perils Of The Sea
Andrea on 02-03-2012
Perils Of The Sea
Ah, those Argonauts, eh? What a bunch! Really lovely pome, Luigi. Had to think of all those painting of ginormous, many-tentacled sea monsters rising from the deep to engulf ships!

Author's Reply:
What tickles me about these mythological voyagers is the length of time that it took them to get back to their wives. I can imagine Penelope dropping a stitch and grumbling: "It's now ten years since he went. I bet is having another jar with his mates. I'll give him another ten minutes then I'll get myself a toyboy."
As for those cartographers, not having a great knowledge of geography at the time, had to fill the maps with something and came up with the idea of populating them with monsters. Clever clogs!

Luigi x

dylan on 03-03-2012
Perils Of The Sea
Yep, ancient maps are fascinating.
Thoses damn sirens, though.
Very nice poem, Luigi.
Orrabest,

D.


Author's Reply:
Don't you feel sorry for those ancient sailors, like Odysseus? Not only didn't they have any maps to navigate by but also had to contend with a lot of temptations such as the sirens and the goddess Circe to whose attentions, I notice, our hero didn't put up much of a resistance.
Nice to hear from you Jon and congratulations on your recent success.

ChairmanWow on 03-03-2012
Perils Of The Sea
Ancient maps are valuable art. I see your fine poem as a metaphor for the rough maps we are given to navigate through life period, not just seafaring. Sirens can be land based as well.

Ralph

Author's Reply:
Thanks Ralph for your feedback. Much appreciated.
I can see that you are a shrewd analyst, able to read between the lines.

RoyBateman on 04-03-2012
Perils Of The Sea
Hey, Luigi, you've probably solved one of the great maritime mysteries of our age: "Hey! I remember now! I didn't go too close to the rocks, it was those pesky sirens, luring me onwards, all the time! Oh, and then I fell into a lifeboat."
You've got to watch these unexpected sea monsters, they're a real bugger on the Manchester Ship Canal, as are the siren calls of the dockside pubs. It's no wonder sailors are so superstitious, is it? All that guff about nailing albatrosses to the captain's log before they Roger the cabin boy, stuff like that.
Seriously, old maps are always a treat with their imagined creatures and wonderfully distorted sea-monsters (Like something out of a Terry Gilliam film) - it's no wonder sailors' imaginations ran riot. Unusual and thought-provoking, as so often with your musings.

Author's Reply:
I don't go to Manchester very often but now that I know there are monsters on the Manchester Ship Canal I shall be wary of visiting that metropolis. Sirens calling from dockside pubs are a worry: they want to spirit me away. It will take them a lot of gills to achieve their objectives. I thought it was an accepted practice for a cabin boy's mainbrace to be split so why waste an albatross? And anyway aren't they worn around one's neck?
I set out to simply thank you Roy then I got diverted into these monstrous puns for which I apologise.
Cheers.


A Real Connoisseur (posted on: 27-02-12)
My second entry to the 'ANTIQUES & CURIOS' prose/poetry challenge.

Don't argue with me, I should know; I am always watching TV programmes like 'Flog It', 'The Antiques Roadshow' or 'Cash in the Attic'. I've learnt a lot. You are talking to an inveterate expert who can spot a fraud a mile away and to do that you have to be very alert. I can value anything, more or less, even a manuscript by Walter Scott. I can tell you that Picassos are priceless, that purchase of ivory was banned as the number of elephants declined, and how the auction rooms are manned. Well, yes OK; I failed to recognise a fake but I am somebody who's self-taught. You cannot blame me, for heaven's sake, for wasting your dosh without a thought. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for A Real Connoisseur
Andrea on 27-02-2012
A Real Connoisseur
Ah, another armchair expert, eh? You watch too much telly, Luigi πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
I know Andrea, but what can I do? I haven't got too much energy to chase skirts any longer, so the best way to relax is with a pair of slippers and a comfy armchair in front of the box.

Luigi x

barenib on 27-02-2012
A Real Connoisseur
Hi Luigi - I guess this makes you the Arthue Negus of UKA πŸ™‚
Your poem is priceless of course - John.

Author's Reply:
More Arthur Daley, John.
Thanks for your nice words.

franciman on 27-02-2012
A Real Connoisseur
Hi Luigi,

This made me smile. for some reason I heard Leonard Rossiter reciting this?

cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Hi Jim. Ah, Leonard Rossiter. A consummate actor. I always Remember his portrayal of Rigsby in 'Rising Damp'.
Thanks for reading and commenting. Much appreciated.

Bradene on 28-02-2012
A Real Connoisseur
Once again this reminds me strongly of someone I used to know so well . Good one Luigi. Valx

Author's Reply:
He must have made a lasting impression, dear Val. I suspect it wasn't a pleasant experience but I may be mistaken.

Luigi x

RoyBateman on 01-03-2012
A Real Connoisseur
I think we all know where you're coming from here - we all dream of picking up a genuine jacobean radiogram from some unsuspecting twit at a car boot sale...mind you, they're too early in the morning for me, and my car's got a boot already so I don't see the point. For some reason, this reminded me of that classic Pete 'n Dud sketch in the art gallery - we'd all LIKE to be experts, wouldn't we? Nice one!

Author's Reply:
What confuses me is that some car boot sales are conducted in a garage with not a car in sight, let alone a boot. No matter, we are always hopeful of finding something valuable but often we haven't a clue as to the worth of anything.
Pete 'n Dud were hilarious. Was that sketch where Dud had got lost or was waiting by the Pissarro? Classic.
Thanks for the comment, Roy.


Fading Memory (posted on: 20-02-12)
***

Dear friend I kid you not; my memory, of late, has been fading somewhat. The future looks bleak. I think of a word but it's not the one I seek. Is it paranormal, paramount, paraquat? I consider them for a while, but decide to ditch them all. Judging by the headache that I've got the word I'm looking for is paracetamol.* © Luigi Pagano 2012 *Paracetamol n (Medicine / Pharmacology) a mild analgesic and antipyretic drug used as an alternative to aspirin [US name acetaminophen [from para-acetamidophenol]
Archived comments for Fading Memory
orangedream on 20-02-2012
Fading Memory
Now if there ever was a poem I could identify with, one hundred percent, this would be it;-)

I know the feeling only too well, Luigi;-)

Loved the word play with the paranormal, paracetamol, etc. etc.

Much enjoyed.

Tina xx

Author's Reply:
Et tu, Brute? It happens a lot to us youngsters, Tina.
Thanks for the comment.

Luigi xx


Bradene on 20-02-2012
Fading Memory
Those senior moments! hey Luigi I get them all the time. It's so frustrating. Good write. Valx

Author's Reply:
Senior moments and senior citizen seem to go hand in hand, dear Val. Surely not in your case?

Luigi x

Andrea on 20-02-2012
Fading Memory
Hahaha, great pome Luigi - now what was I going to do again? Oh yes, give yer a Tweet...

Author's Reply:
Dear Andrea, a great invention of yours the giving of tweets: it has trebled my readership in no time. Ah, the power of advertising! Many thanks.

Luigi x

Andrea on 20-02-2012
Fading Memory
Has it really? I'm planning to get a Facebook button done too...

Don't forget to do your own fair share of Twatting!

Author's Reply:

jay12 on 20-02-2012
Fading Memory
Great poem, reminded me of those days when I can remember nothing but.... nowt! Its not paracetamol you need its a nommy for the anthology... it cures all ills. πŸ™‚

Jay.

PS Twatting is OK as long as you don't twat too much.

Author's Reply:
Hi Jay, nommies for the anthology are not as easily available as paracetamols and the list is already bursting at the seams, but thanks for the thought anyway.
I rarely, if ever, twit, twat or twoo. I don't know how.
Cheers.

ChairmanWow on 21-02-2012
Fading Memory
This poem evokes memory lapse experience, and it happens to youngsters like me all the time. my teenage daughter is constantly losing her cellphone, ipod, something. Part of the human experience to not be able to find the right word or know why you came upstairs.

Ralph

Author's Reply:
Memory lapses, Ralph, can happen at any age. In the case of teenagers that may be deliberate to get out of scrapes but for the like of us senior citizen there is not much choice, it just happens.
Thanks for reading this piece and remembering to comment.

Best...who am I? Ah yes, Luigi.

franciman on 21-02-2012
Fading Memory
Great Work Luigi, whatever it's about. By the time I get here from the sub, I've forgotten the sub, though it must be worthy of a comment or I wouldn't be here, Right?

cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
It seemed very logical at first, then I lost the thread, Jim. It's all very confusing but I seem to remember it now.
Thanks for reminding me.
Best, Luigi

chant_z on 22-02-2012
Fading Memory
Your piece gave me a very good time. Thank you very much. If you make changes it might be for the worse.

Author's Reply:
Hello chant_z. Nice to hear from you and welcome to this site. Thanks for reading and letting me know that you enjoyed the piece.

Best regards, Luigi.

sunken on 22-02-2012
Fading Memory
Lovely poem, Mr. Luigi. I'll be completely knackerd when I'm senior if my current memory is anything to go by. I think I have the memory capacity of an octogenarian already. I'm doomed, doomed I tell ya. By the way, you do know how to tweet. Andrea has made it even simpler for us now. She's a wonderful woman ya know? But don't say I said so. All you do now is hit the tweet button on any poem you wanna tweet. You'll have to shove ya twitter username and password in, but after that you are sorted. You can do it. I've every confidence. Smashing poem, as they always are from your hand.

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and finally I'd like to thank wayne for supplying the traffic cones

Author's Reply:
We are all doomed, my friend, and we were told this many years ago by Fraser the undertaker in 'Dad's Army'. (I tell you in confidence that I had to ask my wife what the title of that comedy was).
I know that Andrea is a wonderful woman but she keeps rejecting my advances. Yet I won't hold it against her.
Don't tell her that I said that: she may be getting the wrong end of the stick. Do I detect that you are misunderstanding my meaning? My words do not contain double entendres, only single malts.
I have been reading your blog and was very amused. Keep it up, as the saying goes.
Saluti, Luigi.

*I thought that it was John Major in charge of the cones. It shows how wrong we can be.*

RoyBateman on 23-02-2012
Fading Memory
Senior moment...what senior moment? Oh, THAT one, yes. Mm... Now, where's my tea. I'd certainly stay on the paracetamol, Luigi, that paraquat leaves a stinking hangover. Rather like toilet duck and lime. Or was that draught Bass...oh, I forget. Another great chuckle-provoker!

Author's Reply:
A stinking hangover? That must have been the reason I was looking for a paracetamol but I don't recall having imbibed any paraquat. I told you that my memory was fading.
Good job we can laugh about it but it isn't a pleasant prospective.
Thanks, Roy, for your appreciation of the piece.


Lois and Clark (posted on: 06-02-12)
Deception.

Pity poor Lois. It must have been the oldest trick in the book, but she fell for it; hook, line, and sinker. She went out with a stinker whom she mistook for Superman. But it was only Clark in his fancy dress just wanting to impress. He kept her in the dark not revealing his plan. To show her his power he went up, in a lift, to the top of a tower and waved his hands to simulate flights, wearing only a cape and a pair of tights. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for Lois and Clark
Kat on 06-02-2012
Lois and Clark
This is very inspired writing, Luigi - love it!

Kat x

Author's Reply:
A bit of nonsense that was destined for the 'Just plain daft' category, but then I chickened out and promoted it to 'Humour'. It seems to have tickled you and I am glad.
Thanks for reading and commenting.

Bradene on 06-02-2012
Lois and Clark
Lovely Luigi is this a re-post? it feels familiar to me. Even so I enjoyed the read. Valx

Author's Reply:
No, dear Val, it is my latest masterpiece. Very noble of you to say you enjoyed it and I thank you for it.

Luigi x

orangedream on 06-02-2012
Lois and Clark
Much enjoyed...as ever, Luigi;-)

Tina x

Author's Reply:
Oh, hi Tina. Nice to see you on these pages again.

Luigi x

Andrea on 06-02-2012
Lois and Clark
and even worse, he wore his y-fronts on top of his tights!

Author's Reply:
Shucks! And I thought it was the latest fashion. I shall have to change my habits.

Luigi x

Andrea on 06-02-2012
Lois and Clark
Ah, but being a handsome stallion, you'd probably get away with it, Luigi!

Author's Reply:

Corin on 06-02-2012
Lois and Clark
Very amusing Luigi. If only I were superman ????

Author's Reply:
Thanks for the comment, David.
Being superman is a state of mind.

Leila on 08-02-2012
Lois and Clark
ha ha Luigi once again you make me smile...Leila

Author's Reply:
Your smile is my reward. Much appreciated.

Luigi x

ChairmanWow on 09-02-2012
Lois and Clark
Dressing to impress isn't what it used to be. Good satire of the dating scene just in time for Saint Valentine's Day.

Ralph

Author's Reply:
I well remember the dating scene of my youth, Ralph, when we tried to impress the girls by wearing wide-flared jeans and kept long hair a-la Beatles. The girls made an impact on us with their miniskirts at first and then, later on, hot-pants. Those were the days.

Cheers, Luigi.

Romany on 11-02-2012
Lois and Clark
Ha ha, like your style. Clever twist as usual.

Romany.

Author's Reply:
Cheers Sue. Many thanks.

Luigi x


My Kind Of Town (posted on: 09-01-12)
A rural sketch.

I travelled far and wide to find a town in which I would be glad to settle down. Finally there was one that passed the test; it is a lovely spot in the north-west. It might not be as old as Rome but it is a place I can call home. Handforth is the name, in Cheshire county, renowned for friendship and rich bounty. People in this town are not hostile; in fact they will give you a warm smile as they wish you good morning or good day. They are perfect citizens, I have to say. © Luigi Pagano 2012
Archived comments for My Kind Of Town
deed on 10-01-2012
My Kind Of Town
A good poem about the journey of life. Often the 'home' that is found is the church.

Author's Reply:
Aye deed, and traditionally there is a village pub alongside the church. Both tending to the spirit.
Thanks for reading and commenting.

ChairmanWow on 10-01-2012
My Kind Of Town
Evokes Idyllic images. Hope it stays that way for you and the other good people there.

Author's Reply:
I felt that not enough credit is given to our environs, especially when we find congenial neighbours.
We read so much about derelict places with dysfunctional inhabitants that it makes a change to be able to learn about praiseworthy towns and villages. Let's hope, as you rightly say, that it stays that way.
Thanks.

woodbine on 12-01-2012
My Kind Of Town
Dear Luigi,
I should be interested to read some more about it
Best wishes,
John

Author's Reply:
Dear John, there is actually a wikipedia entry - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Handforth - about the place.
It gives you factual information but no sense of atmosphere. I prefer to think of it as a Midsomer village without the murders.
Best, Luigi.

woodbine on 13-01-2012
My Kind Of Town
What a wonderful way of putting it, Midsomer village without the murders.

Only yesterday I heard that an Oxford scholar is being investigated over the death of another. How can this be without anyone ringing for Lewis? Television has reduced the Oxford where I was born into a box of actors standing in front of picture postcard views. It has fossilised a real city into a venue for tourists and souvenir shops that only the most casual observer could mistake for the real thing.
Desperately sad, in my opinion.

Author's Reply:
I see what you mean, John. It is now compulsory, it seems, to use an historic location as a backdrop.
Such a practice only gives a pictorial depiction - like a postcard, as you rightly say - but does not instruct the viewer about the reality of the place. Only the people who know the city intimately can savour its true beauty and liveliness.

sunken on 18-01-2012
My Kind Of Town
Saw this a few weeks ago, Mr. Luigi. I meant to comment but got distracted by an Egg McMuffin. You should send it to a local paper or something. I suspect, by the way, that Hanforth is a richer place for your presence. I hope they know they've a smashing poet in their midst.

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a frustrating start for argos

Author's Reply:
It is easy to get distracted, Mr Sunken; who wouldn't be? I once sent an Egg McMuffin to my local paper but they didn't appreciate it.
The inhabitants of Handforth know that they have an unrecognised genius in their midst. I managed to sell seven (or was it eight?) books of my poetry after a reading in the local library. Since then...silence.
I must have left them speechless.




The Watch Stopped (posted on: 30-12-11)
An idle thought.

The watch stopped at ten past ten. Was that the time when he died, then? We can't be sure, there is some doubt: it might well be the battery ran out. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for The Watch Stopped
deed on 30-12-2011
The Watch Stopped
I love the drama in this short poem. It is almost folk-lore that the watch stops indicating the time of death - but the battery 'ran out' - what would Poirot have thought of that?

Author's Reply:
Hi deed. This short was inspired by the fact that the battery on my watch had run out. By association of ideas I thought of the belief that some people hold that at the time of someone's death the watch stops functioning.
I am sure that Poirot would have put his 'grey cells' to good use to solve the puzzle.
Thanks for reading and commenting.

stormwolf on 30-12-2011
The Watch Stopped
Hi Luigi

I loved this. Although often spoken of, I know it to be fact. My father's watch, when I took it off his wrist, stopped at the time of his death. I smiled, as we often sang the song 'My Grandfather's Watch'
Well done Alison x

Author's Reply:
Dear Alison, you can see from the reply above how I came to write this little ditty. As it happened, the watch stopped whilst on my wrist and I was very much alive. Still am, I think.
Cynic that I am, I believe that the occurrence of a watch stopping at the time of death is purely coincidental but I may be wrong.

Luigi x


An Unexpected Visitor (posted on: 23-12-11)
An archangel calls.

When I think of an angel, I imagine one with wings, a diaphanous creature with a melodious harp plucked by nimble fingers while the cherub sings. It doesn't really matter if the intonation is sharp. With this in mind, I expected one whose name was Michael, Gabriel, Raphael, or some such. Instead I had visit from Gabriella, whose claim of being extraterrestrial didn't amount to much. For a start she was not alar and, in her hand, she had not a stringed instrument but an iPod which, in the confines of heaven, had been banned. Therefore I came to the conclusion that it was odd. Mind you, the fact she was female made a change; in these day of equal opportunities it makes sense. After the initial shock, I did not find it strange and I soon found out that it has its recompense. Since that day we got on well, Gabriella and I, and she's imbued with a celestial quality after all. She is truly an angel to me and that is why I am grateful to the gods who arranged her fall. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for An Unexpected Visitor
ChairmanWow on 23-12-2011
An Unexpected Visitor
There are angels and then there are angles. nice romp thru angel imagery.

Author's Reply:
This is an angel seen from a different angle, you might say.
Thanks for reading.

deed on 23-12-2011
An Unexpected Visitor
A beautiful love poem - unusual, interesting and nicely rhymed - well done.

Author's Reply:
So glad you like it, deed. Much obliged to you for your favourable comment.

Andrea on 23-12-2011
An Unexpected Visitor
A fallen angel is much more interesting than one sitting on a cloud twanging a harp, Luigi.

Author's Reply:
Great minds think alike, Andrea. I couldn't agree more.

Luigi x


Hopelessness (posted on: 16-12-11)
***

Not everyone believes that hope can provide solace. There are some men who cannot cope with life's adversities and give in to despair. They turn to dope and cease to care and even contemplate the rope. If only they had the strength to withstand the slings and arrows of misfortune they could resist Dante's cry to ''Abandon hope''. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Hopelessness
dylan on 16-12-2011
Hopelessness
Nice rhythm, succinct and ironic.
All the ingredients of a Luigi poem-v. nice read.

Orrabest,
D.

Author's Reply:
Cheers D. Comment gratefully received.

Regards, Luigi.

deed on 16-12-2011
Hopelessness
When I read this poem my immediate thought was - "where can they find such strength?" Then "what happened in their life that caused this?" Your poem would make a great discussion starter for sociology students! The short lines and terse rhythms help give the feeling of 'pointing out' something without giving the detail that we then long for.

Author's Reply:
Hello and welcome to UKA.
You make a very valid point: the topic would indeed be a starting point for discussion. In fact it is meant to generate a reaction from readers. If we had all the answers, the questions raised in the poem would be redundant.

Capricorn on 16-12-2011
Hopelessness
Very thought provoking, Luigi. I like the way you used shorte lines for emphasis. Well written.

Eira x

Author's Reply:
Hello Eira. Nice to hear from you. Glad to know that you approve of the piece and the format in which it was written.

Luigi x

sunken on 18-12-2011
Hopelessness
Well there's nothing hopeless about your poem, Luigi. Jeezus. I'm being so corny today. I feel like a radio one DJ from the 70's. A strong poem with a strong message. Sensational, as Tony Blackburn would say. I met him once ya know. He's not so nice in real life. He told me to fuck off after a wayward shopping trolley incident. I was shocked. I have never shopped there since. He's got a right mouth on him and no mistake. I hope ths has helped. Hello?

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Author's Reply:
That just goes to show how dangerous shopping is. I keep telling my wife that I am hopeless at it. Shopping that is; I wouldn't want to give the wrong impression. But we must be honest and say that there certain things at which we can't be anything else but hopeless. It is comforting to know that my poem doesn't come into that category and thank you for pointing it out.

stormwolf on 18-12-2011
Hopelessness
Hi Luigi
It is thought provoking and more sombre than your usual poems but seems to be there is hardly a day goes by when we are not reading about someone who has taken his own life and sometimes his family's too.
Seems some can cope better than others.
Alison x

Author's Reply:
Alison, you are so right. These sad situations seem to occur more frequently nowadays or else they are reported more widely. It is difficult to understand what drives some people to such extremes, not only to self-destruct but also to extinguish the life of relatives who they must have loved. For someone who isn't familiar with depression it is inexplicable.


How To Grow Old Disgracefully (posted on: 12-12-11)
See also How To Grow Old Gracefully

This is how to grow old… disgracefully: you must possess savoir-faire and skill, you have to be wealthy or charismatic and need to gain the ladies' goodwill . They may be looking for a father figure, or they might believe in old Santa still; they'll say your love should be platonic but if that is so, why are they on the pill? You may be lucky and meet some twins but do not think you are seeing double. Please ensure that they aren't under age or else, like Silvio, you'll be in trouble. You will be described as a dirty old man, some will go further and call you a perv, (in your youth you were called 'a randy lad') Just remain calm and don't lose your nerve. Do not weaken and don't show a soft spot; you'd better perform under cover in the dark. The ultimate objective is to please the girls, so it's important that there is a lot of spark. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for How To Grow Old Disgracefully
woodbine on 12-12-2011
How To Grow Old Disgracefully
It's good to see you still have the knack to please the eye to turn the phrase. Good luck with the ladies.
Best wishes,
John

Author's Reply:
Hiya, John. Nice to hear from you. Are you keeping well?
Chasing the ladies has always been my favourite pastime. Thanks for your comment.

Best, Luigi.

ChairmanWow on 12-12-2011
How To Grow Old Disgracefully
i aspire to be an old lecher some day. poem makes me feel good inside.

Author's Reply:
Some of us have already fulfilled that aspiration, ChairmanWow, but you are welcome to join the ranks.
A poem seems to work wonders in softening the ladies' heart.

stormwolf on 13-12-2011
How To Grow Old Disgracefully
I should have married an Italian. I see that now πŸ˜‰
Delightful Luigi. delightful

Alison x

Author's Reply:
No use crying over spilt 'latte', delightful Alison; you should have told me of your intentions (dishonourable, I hope) earlier.
Thanks for your welcome visit.

Luigi x

sunken on 15-12-2011
How To Grow Old Disgracefully
Hello Mr. Luigi. Some excellent advice there, and all in poetry form. You are to be applauded, Luigi, for passing on your wisdom so selflessly. It's also good to know that age is no barrier where disgrace is concerned. Keep up the good work (and the poetry).

s
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this is not tesco

Author's Reply:
Hello Mr. Sunken. I am always been good at lechering, so they tell me, but not so good at spelling so you'll have to excuse me if I am leading you ashtray. Or should that be astray? No matter, I see that my message has come through alright and thank you for letting me know.
Cheers.


How To Grow Old Gracefully (posted on: 09-12-11)
In response to Simon's challenge.

Albert is ninety-five years of age and he is an independent guy. Lucky to have reached this stage, he has seen many of his pals die. He hates the idea of care homes and lives in a two-bedroom flat but it's a park where he often roams that prevents him from getting fat. He believes in 'no pain, no gain' and exercises to be physically fit but he also keeps his brain in train so that he won't become decrepit. You may think that his life is boring and that he's become rather tame but the fire in him is still roaring and he can quickly kindle the flame. There is nothing better than a dame to re-ignite the ardour of a man and he will have himself to blame if things don't go according to plan. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for How To Grow Old Gracefully
Kat on 09-12-2011
How To Grow Old Gracefully
I love the message in this, Luigi, and enjoyed the read very much.

? should be 'two-bedroom' or 'two-bedroomed' flat.

I particularly like the 3rd stanza.

Have a great weekend!

Kat x

Author's Reply:
Many thanks Kim. You are as usual eagle-eyed in spotting my little flaws. It's strange that the grammar check on my PC didn't pick that up. I tried 'two-bedroomed' but the spell checker didn't like it. Anyway it is sorted now.

Have a nice weekend yourself.

Luigi x

sunken on 10-12-2011
How To Grow Old Gracefully
"I just called to sing 'Luigi'
I just called to say how much I care.
I just called to sing 'Luigiiiiiii...
And I mean it from the bottom of my heart..."

Stevie could have at least attempted to make it rhyme, Luigi. Anyway, the sentiment is there. Yes it's out. I have a bromance on the boil and his name his Luigi. Don't worry, your credentials will not be harmed by my proclamations. I love you in a manly way, not a gay way. Though there's nothing wrong with being gay as our very own PJ will tell you. He's gay ya know? I feel I'm digging a big hole here. I'll just say I enjoyed your poem immensely, as I do the majority of your stuff. Up the Italians I say. That's not a gay reference by the way, just so ya know. I'll leave quietly by back entrance if that's ok, Luigi. I feel I've made a proper tits up if this comment.

s
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Author's Reply:
Dear sunken, all this gayety is overwhelming. I never looked askance at a happy bunny of the Playboy variety especially on a grey day like today. Mind you, I once met one of these bunnies who happened to be both happy and gay but at the time I believed Queen Victoria who denied the existence of females of that persuasion.
Needless to say, I did not dig any hole, big or otherwise, on that occasion. I am much wiser now.
Anyway thank Stevie for the lyrics even if they don't rhyme and Bernard for his top bark.

stormwolf on 11-12-2011
How To Grow Old Gracefully
I really loved the message in this poem Luigi. It is one of not judging by anything so misleading as apprearances or ages. Having nursed many people of great age, I know that inside, they are as they were, and it is we who fail to realise that Alison x

Author's Reply:
You are so right Alison. When people reach an advanced age they are considered to be over the hill. I know a particular centenarian who is as bright as a button. Physically she may have slowed down but mentally she's all there.
Thanks for reading and commenting.

Luigi x


Last Night (posted on: 28-11-11)
The music and radical politics of Woody Guthrie presented by Professor Will Kaufman at Menorah Synagogue on 26th November 2011.

I went to a synagogue last night. Not to listen to a rabbi reading the scroll nor to participate in any rite but to hear a man talk of Woody Guthrie. This man is not only a fine historian but also an accomplished entertainer. His name is Will Kaufman, a scholar, from the University of Central Lancashire. He regaled us with many of Woody's songs, ''The Vigilante Man'', ''Pretty Boy Floyd'' and ''I Ain't Got No Home'', among others. He told us of the Dust Bowl and the Depression, of the songwriter's anger and passion and how he always fought against oppression championing the rights of the underclass. We learnt that he lived among the 'okie', migrants from the state of Oklahoma and Texas who wished to relocate to California but were disparaged by West Coast residents. They made the trip along Route 66 and resided in lodgings that were pokey. Guthrie's life was always a quagmire, his existence being affected by tragedies the majority of which were due to fire. His health was also a source of unease: like his mother and other relatives he succumbed to Huntington disease. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Last Night
barenib on 29-11-2011
Last Night
Hi Luigi, the evening sounds fascinating, and you've described it very effectively, along with giving us a flavour of Guthrie. John.

Author's Reply:
It was certainly an enlightening experience and it broadened my knowledge of the United States in the 1930s and the attitudes prevalent at the time.


Protest (posted on: 25-11-11)
Loitering within tent. (My entry to this week's Forum challenge.)

It's happening everywhere, in the East and West: people with a grievance are taking to the street to express their resentment and register a protest; those without franchise are voting with their feet. The causes? Manifold: it could be regime change, rejection of capitalism, condemnation of the banks for failing to lend money, which seems rather strange. Who is it that we can blame? Eurozone or the Yanks? No matter. Somewhere, there's bound to be a culprit. That's the reason why we came out in sympathy. But the powers-that-be have served us with a writ and yet they always told us we lived in a democracy. This strengthens our resolve and we'll stick together: we shall camp overnight in rainproof canvas tents in case our enemies can summon some bad weather. One thing is in our favour, we won't be paying rents. Our fate always depends on what the Courts intend, they will send the bailiffs to carry out the eviction and see that their instructions are followed to the end. And that, I am afraid, will deflate our conviction. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Protest
TeflonTaff on 25-11-2011
Protest
No, man. I don't think it'll deflate their conviction at all.

You can break our guy-ropes but not our hearts!

Author's Reply:
It can only be that rebel without a pause, Mac. How are you mate?
I used to be an idealist searching for Utopia and can to a certain extent sympathise with those protesters but doubt very much that they will achieve their aim of eradicating poverty and bringing about world peace.

Elfstone on 25-11-2011
Protest
Good to read this again - nice one!
Elf.

Author's Reply:
Thanks again, Elf. I seem to remember that you too queried whether their conviction would be dampened by the action taken by the authorities. I suspect not but if we look at the practicality of such protests we have to ask ourselves how effective they really are. As I pointed out to TeflonTaff, there still is poverty around the world
and no prospect of universal peace.
I may be an old cynic but I also like to play the devil's advocate.
Thanks for the comment,
Luigi x


Oil, Arms And The Man (posted on: 21-11-11)
With apologies to G. B. Shaw. A personal point of view.

We quite often mention that necessity is the mother of invention. So it is only natural that when it comes to oil we find it necessary to conjure up an arsenal under an enemy's soil. We can then justify military intervention. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Oil, Arms And The Man
sunken on 23-11-2011
Oil, Arms And The Man
Hello Luigi. This is short and succinct. A bit like my aunty flo. She's dead now. Anyway, that's not important at this juncture. A different style to your norm. There appears to be many bows to your rod... I'm sure I've got that wrong. Anyway, a tight and concise piece that deserves far more attention. Thank you.

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Author's Reply:
Dear Mr. Sunken this piece is indeed like your aunty Flo, quite moribund. I was about to give it the coup de grace when your comment arrived and then it was too late. It would have been discourteous to delete it together with your - far too generous - feedback. It will be allowed to survive for a few days yet.
As for my rod, it is quite plain: no frilly bows about it. Unfortunately I can't produce any witness to testify the veracity of my assertion. Thank you and good day,

Capricorn on 24-11-2011
Oil, Arms And The Man
A short poem that says a lot - I like it!

Eira

Author's Reply:
Thanks very much Eira, I was beginning to think that it didn't say enough.

Luigi x

Andrea on 25-11-2011
Oil, Arms And The Man
Excellent, Luigi - and so true!

Author's Reply:
Cheers, me dear. At last a twin soul.

Luigi x


Harmony (posted on: 18-11-11)
A revised version of the poem submitted to this week's Forum challenge.

You haven't heard, I bet, of Ray, Jim, Bob and Tony, the Barbershop Quartet discovered by Sony. They are a gifted bunch, real singers - not mimics - and I've got the hunch they don't rely on gimmicks. A cappella they sing with no instrument to accompany the sound that they bring: it's perfect vocal harmony. But that's not all we get from the barbers who trill: they won't let you forget you have to pay the bill. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Harmony
stormwolf on 18-11-2011
Harmony
hehehe
Reminds me of when I did Bed and breakfast and had a whole bunch of Billy Graham's entourage staying with me. In the morning they cornered me in my own sitting room and prayed for my soul. It was opnly pure chance that my husband came home as they were leaving to find me in a dwam and them ready to drive off not having paid their bill.

Yes, I do not think it was a mistake ;-(
Alison x

Author's Reply:
It is easy to lose concentration when there are others distractions. Perhaps they weren't praying for your soul but praying that they would get away without settling the bill. It would have been handy for one of his Crusades.

Luigi x

Munster on 18-11-2011
Harmony
How fortunate are we to have honesty amongst the majority.
Met Billy Graham years ago, wouldnt recommend it, I still walk with a twitch and talk with a terrible limp.

Good read

Toby

Author's Reply:
I read that he spent personal time with twelve United States presidents. I wonder if he had the same effect on them as he had on you. By the way some of them behaved I wouldn't be surprised.
Anyway, I digress. Thanks for reading and commenting.

sunken on 18-11-2011
Harmony
Hello Mr. Luigi. I've not been to the barbers for years. These days I shave my own head with a set of clippers procured, legally I might add, from Argos. They had a special offer on. There was a point to me telling you this... But I'll be buggered if I can recall what it was. I suspect it will return to me at an inopurtune moment. Last week I remembered the punch line to a joke whilst burying my aunt. It didn't go down well with the other mourners. I should add that I wasn't personally doing the burying of said aunt. I did bury a budgie once tho. I feel I'm rambling. Enjoyed your poem. Your wit, as ever, shines through. I can confirm that the communist beagle enjoyed said piece too. Thank you.

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Author's Reply:
Dear Mr. Sunken, whilst I appreciate the convenience of owning and using a pair of clippers I cannot help thinking that you are missing something by not going to a barber shop. Is your set of clippers an harmonious one and does it sing to you like this quartet would? Also they are men of the world and know what a gentleman needs for the weekend. Have you tried asking for said items at the chemist only to end up buying some toothpaste because the shop assistant was female? Does Bernard have any opinions?
I am off to have a short back and side haircut now but I haven't planned anything for the weekend yet.
Many thanks to you and the mutt for your attention.

Capricorn on 18-11-2011
Harmony
Hi Luigi

I really enjoyed this one and your humorous twist at the end.
I am also fascinated at the stories in this thread!
Eira x

Author's Reply:
Hi Eira. Sometimes the comments are more interesting than the piece itself. Glad you enjoyed the humour in this poem.

Luigi x


A Portrait In Gouache (posted on: 14-11-11)
An ancestor and a 'boneshaker'.

The painting, in gouache, hangs on the study's wall. It portrays a man, with handlebar moustache, atop a penny-farthing with a wheel six feet tall. I am told that he is my great, great-grandfather. The picture was done the day the race took place. At the finish, I gather, my ancestor was third; hence the smiling face. High up on the saddle he resembles a bird about to take off. It was one of those feats at which we now may scoff but when people ask if I would have a go at such precarious task I say that, at that height, I'd suffer vertigo. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for A Portrait In Gouache
Capricorn on 15-11-2011
A Portrait In Gouache
A fascinating story, Luigi - with a touch of humour. Love the ending!

Author's Reply:
Many thanks, Eira, your comment is greatly appreciated.

Luigi x

sunken on 16-11-2011
A Portrait In Gouache
I wonder if the wheel was made that big in order to gain greater speeds? Of course, Mr. Luigi, by 1987 (thanks to Simon Le Bon) we had gears. Not a lot if people know that. Though I suspect Michael Caine does. He knows everything. Must be great to have a picture like that in your family. Another Luigitastic piece and no mistake.

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Author's Reply:
It is unbelievable how Michael Caine seem to know that not many people know that. It is a queer situation and no mistake, as a friend of mine would say. Do you know him?
I am told that due to the Italian financial crisis I will have to make a sacrifice and donate that painting to the Nation, or Berlusconi, whichever/whoever is in greater need.
Tell Bernard to cash in all his Euros and buy gold.

Andrea on 16-11-2011
A Portrait In Gouache
Lovely pome, Luigi - those penny-farthings did look deadly, didn't they?

Author's Reply:
I am surprised at how they can balance on those contraptions. And how do they get to the top, with the help of a crane?
Thanks for reading and commenting.

Luigi x

stormwolf on 17-11-2011
A Portrait In Gouache
What a lovely poem.
I would love to have such a painting and know it was my ancestor. The poem was descriptive and heart-warming too. Those things (penny-farthings) were very odd looking contraptions indeed.
Alison x

Author's Reply:
Lovely to hear from you Alison.
I am sure they had to perform acrobatics on those monsters and marvel at how they were able to mount the velocipedes, as they were called.

Luigi x



Lethargy (posted on: 11-11-11)
What can the matter be?

I really can't explain this sudden lethargy. I haven't any pain nor do I have an allergy. The people around me have boundless energy so what can the reason be for the lack of vitality? Don't say it is my age, though you may be right; I'll get into a rage and it ain't a pretty sight. I've been told by some that it is unavoidable that the day will come when I'm held accountable for the life that I have led. I imagine you believed the lies you have been fed but you've been deceived. I have been all along a paragon of virtue; I didn't do any wrong, I didn't sniff the glue and, unlike many mugs, can proudly declare that I never took drugs. But I am well aware that my main weakness is the female attraction perhaps it was the excess that caused the reaction. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Lethargy
Kat on 11-11-2011
Lethargy
Hehe... a confessionary poem, Luigi? Enjoyed.

Kat x

Author's Reply:
Dear Kim, it is said that confession is good for the soul but I am not one to 'kiss and tell'. Pleased you liked this.

Luigi x

PS I sent the book on the 7th. If you haven't received it yet, it should be with you shortly.

Munster on 11-11-2011
Lethargy
I really can pin my colours to this flag, enjoyed

Author's Reply:
We all feel like this at some time or another, Munster, even if we don't understand the cause. Many thanks for reading and commenting.

Andrea on 11-11-2011
Lethargy
'...a paragon of virtue...' Yeah, right mon ami πŸ™‚

Made me chuckle, Luigi.

Author's Reply:
What, what? Are you casting nasturtiums? I am a good boy, I am; but don't tell the other girls: I have a (bad) reputation to maintain.
Thanks for the chuckle, greatly appreciated.

Luigi x

ifyouplease on 12-11-2011
Lethargy
hehehe nice Luigi

Nic x

Author's Reply:
Thanks Nic. It is good to see that we still can laugh even though our respective countries are in troubled waters.

Luigi x

ifyouplease on 13-11-2011
Lethargy
I'm more satirical and humorous than ever Luigi. x

Author's Reply:
Good on you Nic. Chin up.

Luigi x

Romany on 13-11-2011
Lethargy
Of course you are innocent really Luigi - I always suspected as much...

Romany

Author's Reply:
I knew that I could rely on you, Sue, to confirm what I have always claimed. Thanks for your endorsement.

Luigi x


Money, Money, Money (posted on: 31-10-11)
A Greek Tragedy.

They've lead us to believe the world is at an end; we've read it in the papers and heard it on the radio. There isn't any money, people are loath to spend. I am not an economist so I can't understand where the wealth is gone. Who's hoarding the cash? Banks don't do any lending and firms do not expand. Both Germany and France seem to rule the roost but unless seventeen nations decide to act together the economy will falter and won't receive a boost. They don't appear to have got a feasible solution that will sort out the Euro and Europe with it. Perhaps the Common market needs a fiscal revolution. There may be some nations that aren't keen to budge and refuse to give up their sovereign independence so we must be prepared to see some kind of fudge. But lo! Financial wizards waved the magic wand, made debts disappear, asked China to chip in and showed how it is done to those across the pond. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Money, Money, Money
Kat on 31-10-2011
Money, Money, Money
Dear Luigi, I enjoyed this read very much. You always seem to be full of inspiration.

Kat x

Author's Reply:
Thanks very much, Kim, I try to keep up with the flow. Not always easy.

Luigi x

barenib on 31-10-2011
Money, Money, Money
Luigi, a good take on a thorny issue. I have a feeling we may get a few more poems out of this yet, however! Personally I think we should return to a bartering system - a pint of beer for a limerick perhaps?

Author's Reply:
Your idea of bartering is not as far fetched as you may think, John. I wouldn't mind a beer for one of my ditties; it is more than I get at the moment, which is zilch.
I recently saw a documentary about Transition towns (I don't know whether you are familiar with the concept but basically it is 'an example of socioeconomic localisation'). The place was, if I recall correctly, Lewes and they had issued their own currency which they used instead of the pound. The money was spent in local shops for local products. It fared better than the Euro.

richardwatt on 01-11-2011
Money, Money, Money
Very good!

Author's Reply:
Cheers.

richardwatt on 01-11-2011
Money, Money, Money
Sorry I had meant to leave a fuller comment but I am having nightmarish times with accessing the site, which aren't going away.
Anyway, a knotty poem to deal with a knotty subject, keeping light enough in its tone to help the reader through.

Author's Reply:
Hi and welcome back. The site must appear strange after all this time.
Many thanks for the comment, which is much appreciated.

stormwolf on 01-11-2011
Money, Money, Money
You nailed it Luigi. That dry wit always lifts my spirits. What happens now is anybodies guess.
Alison x

Author's Reply:
They are keeping us on tenterhooks. The Chinese are waving two fingers at the EU, Greece are to have a referendum (crafty move that, I thought) and the expert are running around like headless chickens.
I may have to write another ditty in the near future.

Luigi x

sunken on 02-11-2011
Money, Money, Money
Hello Luigi. I see Greece are to hold a referendum. We used to have referendums here I believe? I hope those Greeks make the right decision. I want to buy a new tele soon. Oh look, we a new spell checking facility... See how easily I\'m distracted from World affairs, Luigi? Never from your work though. It kept me reading right to the end. Tip top as ever, my good fellow.

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Author's Reply:
Referendums (referenda?) are a sign of democracy. You can always have an additional one if you don't like how it turned the first time, as it happened in Ireland and in other countries if my memory is correct. So the Greeks must make the right decision or else have to try again until they get it right. What that right decision is I couldn't tell you and possibly you couldn't be arsed. So, instead, have a referendum with Bernard regarding the acquisition of a new tele (telephone/telex/television: delete as appropriate).

*never, ever fasten the top button on your shirt by yourself. Always ask a nimble female to do it (and fasten the top button too).*

Leila on 02-11-2011
Money, Money, Money
On the ball Luigi and all with a jaunty rhyme and rhythm...Leila

Author's Reply:
Nice to hear from you Eileen. Glad you approve. The rhymes are as they are because originally the lines were as follows:

They’ve lead us to believe the world is at an end;
we’ve read it in the papers and heard it on the radio.
There isn’t any money, people are loath to spend.

As an afterthought I halved the length of the lines as I believed it would emphasise the rhythm.
Thanks for leaving a comment.

Luigi x


Sartorial Excellence (posted on: 21-10-11)
A revised version.

A tailor from the East End, he is bespoke. Comes highly recommended, a skilled bloke. Because I hate buying clothes off the peg, I have to watch him measuring each leg. I feel too tense and am unable to relax when he proceeds to examine my thorax, my arms, my shoulders and my butt to ensure that nothing spoils the cut; any bulge might make the stitches split. Seems satisfied that the suit will fit and jots all the particulars in a log. I sense that this is only the prologue: he is free with my body as bold as brass, will his next move be to make a pass? It is said that he boasts of exclusivity, proud of his workmanship and creativity. I cannot dispute the garments' quality but I question the sartor's proclivity. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Sartorial Excellence
franciman on 21-10-2011
Sartorial Excellence
Hi Luigi,

I just love the Sartor's proclivity!

Cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Be very, very careful Jim.
Thanks for reading,
Luigi.

RoyBateman on 24-10-2011
Sartorial Excellence
Mm...you've got to be careful. They're not all John Inman clones, either - at least, I presume not. It's been a long time since I had anything made to measure, and when I did it took me ages to get what he was talking about when he asked "which side sir dressed"...cheeky blighter!

Author's Reply:
Roy, didn't you tell him that you always dressed upwards?
You are right, they are not all John Inman clones but why do they have to measure your inside legs so many times?
Whenever I get suits off the peg the length of the trousers is too long, so if I want the right measurement
I'll have to compromise and be double-checked!
My usual thanks for your welcome comment.

sunken on 26-10-2011
Sartorial Excellence
Hello Mr. Luigi. I wanted one of your poems to be amongst the first I 'commented' on using my shiny new iPad. Yes, that's right. I got myself a god tablet. All I can say is, god must have a pretty big gob if this is his idea of a tablet. Superb poem, my good fellow. No one does it quite like you. I don't have my Bernard link so I'll slap one on ya later. Great stuff.

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back to the tutor

Author's Reply:
My dear fellow, I am beginning to feel an inferiority complex on the technological front. First I hear that Shy is the proud possessor of a kindle and now I learn that you got yourself an iPad. I am really envious of you guys.
But no matter: I soldier on.
I like your comment "No one does it quite like you." It could be the beginning of a poem. As you can see I am a bit short of ideas and I clutch at any straw. I'll be writing about animated cartoons if I'm not careful.
I really do miss Bernard, you know.

sunken on 26-10-2011
Sartorial Excellence
As promised, Mr. Luigi, a smelly flea infested Bernard...

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Author's Reply:
You can slap me with a Bernard any time. Thank you.
It wasn't him who persuaded the 'nibbers', was he?

Kat on 26-10-2011
Sartorial Excellence
A classic Luigi! And, a classic, Luigi.

Enjoyed Roy's comment as well. I used to love watching, 'Are You Being Served?'

Kat x

Author's Reply:
Dear Kim,
'Are you being served?' was indeed the inspiration for this ditty. I haven't had a made-to-measure suit for donkeys years but the thought of that programme reawakened memories of that experience.
Many thanks for the distinction between 'A classic Luigi' and 'a classic, Luigi'.
Much appreciated.

Luigi x


Hen Night (posted on: 07-10-11)
In response to the weekly Prose/Poetry challenge. Key word RIPPLES.

Her vision is impaired - she's had quite a few tipples - but she can see the stripper and how his sinew ripples. She's looking at the scene as if through a thick fog yet notices her girlfriends watching all agog. She would like first refusal and doesn't think it's odd. It isn't every day one meets a demigod. Now they ogle each other, he gives her a wink. Welcoming the overture, the lass is tickled pink. It doesn't happen often but he wouldn't be the first to offer a love potion and help quench her thirst. There will come a time when she will tell the tale of how on her hen night she acquired a Chippendale. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Hen Night
Corin on 07-10-2011
Hen Night
My pectoral muscles ripple now, only its really the fat around them -the moobs:-)

Author's Reply:
There comes a time when we have to admit that we are more Ikea than Chippendale, David.

sunken on 08-10-2011
Hen Night
Lol. A classic slab of Luigi if ever I saw one. Well done on the nib, fella. Muchly deserved.

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Author's Reply:
Ta muchly, dear sir and companion. Greatly appreciated as was the unexpected nib.
I was wondering if Bernard would stand against Putin in the Russian presidential election. Who knows, he might become a canine oligarch.
Best, Luigi.


Early Morning (posted on: 26-09-11)
***

I think that our life is heaven-sent; we can lay in bed to our heart's content listening to a chorus at the crack of dawn. It is early morning, the curtains are drawn, but we know that the sun is about to rise. We're happy here on Earth, we don't need paradise. After lovemaking, we are having a rest, and your hand, very gently, caresses my breast. I look at the clock, it says five-to-five; another day breaks: it is great to be alive. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Early Morning
franciman on 26-09-2011
Early Morning
Hi Luigi,

It sounds very much like a prayer of thanksgiving. I can identify with that very readily. Great Verse.

Cheers
Jim.

Author's Reply:
As always you are apt at finding the 'mot juste', Jim.
Merci Monsieur.

RoyBateman on 26-09-2011
Early Morning
Ah, you've caught the atmosphere nicely with this one...early morning delights, too? You naughty boy, you... It's good to read something that makes me smile with optimism - thanks!

Author's Reply:
Dear Roy, with the world full of gloom and doom I thought that counting one's blessing would make a change.
As for morning delights, no feelgood factor would be complete without due regard to them. I have always been an early riser.
Cheers.

Andrea on 29-09-2011
Early Morning
Delightful, Luigi πŸ™‚
Will remember that next time I want to shoot the birds for waking me up at 5am...bloody wildlife eh?

Author's Reply:
Ta very much Andrea.
So you are preparing for weapons at dawn; poor tweety pies.

sunken on 06-10-2011
Early Morning
Wonderful. Gave me a nice warm glow. It could be food poisoning though to be frank. I ate a right dodgy chicken drumstick earlier. It didn't taste right. I swear I'm going to get the squirts soon, Luigi. I shall employ mind over arse as an avoidance technique. A really sweet poem, my good fellow. You're a lucky man. This is nib worthy in my opinion (which at last count was trading down against both the dollar and the euro. I blame the economic climate - and dolphins of course. They don't fool me with their cute party tricks. Hope this has helped.

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Author's Reply:
Whenever I get your and Bernard's seal of approval I know that I haven't totally failed. I hope you and the mutt are in good health and good spirits, mine is a gin and bitter lemon please.
You should always be aware of dodgy drumsticks. The dodginess can be blamed on the economic situation or on the quantitative greasing. I am trying to concentrate on the creative easing but it is proving to be difficult.
Sursum corda, my friend.


A Girl Across The Pond (posted on: 23-09-11)
Wanted to correspond.

It came from overseas by air-mail, no less. It was addressed to me and yet I couldn't guess who the sender might be. I was a bit anxious about opening the letter: would it be good news that would make me feel better? It started quite promising, it began with ''My Dear''. I knew that if I read on It'd make everything clear. It seems that I had gained a certain kind of fame; I had won a competition and she had seen my name. Enclosed was a picture of a girl of twenty; I was three years her junior with pimples aplenty. I was flattered of course. A girl across the pond wanted to be my friend and wished to correspond. I was a wee embarrassed, her photo showed bare tits; their sight made me blush to the root of my zits. She explained with clarity she wanted to talk dirty and didn't understand why my reply was shirty. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for A Girl Across The Pond
franciman on 24-09-2011
A Girl Across The Pond
Piquant poetry Luigi,

Made me positively titter!

Cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Not very spicy, Jim, just mildly flavoured. Glad you decided to sample it.

RoyBateman on 25-09-2011
A Girl Across The Pond
Luigi, you're fibbing! Come on, I remember (Just...) what kids of seventeen suffer, and it's mainly melancholia exacerbated by nasty pangs of Wanker's Cramp: the best cure for which is a piccie of the sort you describe.
This never happened to me, and I'm downright bloody jealous, I tell you. I wonder why not? Mm... Seriously (!), this really amused me - especially the unexpected tits/zits rhyme. Nice one!

Author's Reply:
You know me, Roy. I tend to embroider things a bit but I am not entirely fibbing. There was no photograph but there was a letter from Brazil; a girl, claiming to be a young widow, had - as I said - written to me wanting to correspond. I was, as a matter of fact, younger than I stated so when the language in her letters started to become salacious I was afraid that the correspondence might be intercepted by my parents and, discretion being the better part of valour, I discontinued the dialogue. There, the secret is out.


Sappho (posted on: 19-09-11)
Poetic extravaganza. Edited.

I hear the name Sappho and by association another comes to mind, that of Lesbos. I haven't read her poems - that's my loss - and don't know why she had a reputation. Was it that her behaviour was too sexy? Or that her verses were so graphic that they would stop the island's traffic because the readers suffered apoplexy? It is clear from one Sapphic stanza that the target of her affections was female: she wrote odes to girls on a grand scale, a display of literary extravaganza. She was exiled from her native land and it was said the reasons were political. You must excuse me if I sound cynical: homosexuality was what got her banned. I say this although I haven't any proof that homoerotic acts were frowned upon in those forgotten days that are long gone. I hope that I won't be regarded as a goof. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Sappho
stormwolf on 22-09-2011
Sappho
Ha! well the issue of same sex has been going on since Adam was a lass.
What is totally frowned upon by one lot is considered natural by another. 'Do no harm' is my philosophy! πŸ˜‰
Alison x

Author's Reply:
Dear Alison, you have expressed the same philosophy I did in my poem 'Shattered Dreams', see HERE


I like the idea of Adam being a lass.

Thanks for reading and commenting.



Luigi x


Renewal (posted on: 19-09-11)
An inspector called.

There has been an inspection of the local park and they have agreed that it is rather stark. I am told it isn't safe to be there in the dark. Apart from a lamppost, on which dogs leave their mark, there is some grassland with a note in bold letters that says ''No football games'' but the children ignore it and play just the same. There have been some bids to provide swings and slides for use by the kids yet decisions are in limbo for reasons of safety. So the youngsters improvise with car tyres on a rope. The council inspector has given us fresh hope: they'll revamp the landscape. It is a commitment from which they can't escape. It looks as if there's room for flowers and fruit trees to blossom and to bloom. An orchard will be planted; it is hard to believe. Hopefully it will be an Eden that won't be spoiled by Eve. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Renewal
franciman on 19-09-2011
Renewal
Hi Luigi,

Simple subject, complex verse, and wonderfully laconic delivery. I can still see the park, always a good sign!

Cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Thanks Jim, you are a gentleman.

stormwolf on 19-09-2011
Renewal
Jim got the perfect wording 'laconic'
Lovely writing Luigi. You never run out of subject matter.
Alison x

Author's Reply:
Bless you Alison. How I wish that I'd never run out of ideas but unfortunately it's not that easy to come up with new topics and often I have to scratch my head for a long time in order to set my brain into motion.

Luigi x


The Good, The Bad and The Ugly. (posted on: 05-09-11)
My effort for last Wednesday's Prose/Poetry challenge.

The landscape is wild, full of cacti. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly are out for revenge and riding by whistling a catchy tune rather smugly. It is supposed to be South America perhaps Bolivia, Mexico, Argentina. I spot a foreign plant: a shrub of erica: Maybe the film was shot outside Messina. A Western with actor Clint Eastwood and directed by one Sergio Leone, in which Clint plays Blondie, the Good, with music supplied by Morricone. This genre is now known as spaghetti. It always involves first-class gunslingers snarling, full of rage, unruly and sweaty, with females in the role of saloon singers. These films were a success at first but imitations reduced their great appeal. and before very long the bubble burst, a decline that's not so easy to conceal. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for The Good, The Bad and The Ugly.
franciman on 05-09-2011
The Good, The Bad and The Ugly.
Hi Luigi,

My Dad called it cinematic Light Opera. I think you touch a mutually held soft spot with this. My pick for the Weekly Challenge.

Cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Your Dad is quite right in his definition, there is enough dramatic tension in those films as there is in a lot of operas. I thank you for kind your appraisal.

Cheers, Luigi

stormwolf on 05-09-2011
The Good, The Bad and The Ugly.
Ah the good ole days of black and white westerns *sigh*

enjoyed very much.
Alsion x

Author's Reply:
Dear Alison, I remember the black and white westerns especially the ones with Randolph Scott, long before your time, but this one, although 45 years old, was in glorious Technicolor. A classic in my opinion.

Luigi x

barenib on 06-09-2011
The Good, The Bad and The Ugly.
Luigi - have you heard the Spaghetti Western Orchestra?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spaghetti_Western_Orchestra
I'm sure they'd bring back some memories, as this poem did for me!
John.

Author's Reply:
Yes John, I saw them briefly at the 2011 Proms and wasn't all that impressed. Mind you I didn't listen for very long; perhaps I should have given them more time. The film music is quite impressive unlike their interpretation.
Hopefully my (poetic) interpretation is satisfactory.
Thanks for the feedback.


The Curse of the Ninth (posted on: 26-08-11)
Ex Prose/Poetry Challenge.

Even today there are endless debates as to why Schubert didn't finish the 8th . Maybe he went drinking with his mates or else he feared the curse of the ninth. It is a superstition, believed to be true, that nine or more symphonies are fatal. Any composer will have cause to rue transgressions of permitted quantities. They cite von Beethoven as an example, as he died after composing the Choral, but contrasting arguments are ample: many prolific musicians weren't jinxed. Could it be that our Franz was sloppy? It is said he didn't complete the 7th either. Perhaps one day he got moody and stroppy and scattered all the scores to the wind. Alternatively he may have been dissatisfied with the result of his musical creation that was intended to be heard worldwide and nipped the work-in-progress in the bud. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for The Curse of the Ninth
RoyBateman on 28-08-2011
The Curse of the Ninth
Ah, yes, maybe it's a bit like the so-called curse of King Tut ("It's true, that is! You know, your poor Uncle Ernie fell down the coal-hole steps reading about that King Tuttifrutti's tomb in the Daily Express! AND he was never a well man afterwards, only lived to be 93, Gawd bless 'im.") in that only a few major composers actually got that far...Vaughan Williams, for one. Old Sibelius got grumpy after seven and packed up, Tchaikovsky managed only six. Then, Elgar only finished two and many of my favourite composers such as Puccini never even bothered with the form at all. And as for Haydn...as you say, there are many good counter-arguments! Interesting stuff, Luigi - we could do with more to make us think a bit, I reckon.

Author's Reply:
Hello Roy. At last another connoisseur! We only have to mention the name of our friend Wolfgang Amadeus to prove the fallacy of that superstition.
Fingers crossed and touch wood that nobody will prove that our sceptimism was unfounded.
Cheers.


Mary (Quite Contrary) (posted on: 22-08-11)
I’ve been watching her garden grow.

A Mary-quite-contrary that I know has deep, soulful eyes which say yes but scarlet lips that, sadly, say no. I've been watching her garden grow, seen her produce come to maturity and her luxuriant bush gain density. I am not allowed to savour the fruits allotted to her by Mother Nature. Of their high quality I can vouch but I can only look; I mustn't touch. Whatever I suggest she will oppose. There is a hint that perhaps in future a certain relaxation might take place but she does not tell it to my face. Now I got used to her contrariness I sense that I've got to judge her mood, be patient and stand by in readiness of the day when she'll stop being a prude. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Mary (Quite Contrary)
RachelLW on 24-08-2011
Mary (Quite Contrary)
Luigi, Luigi.... Quite erm...made me smile as usual. Very good. Very hopeful... I liked the 'certain relaxation'. Rachel x

Author's Reply:
Rachel, only a moderate erm..., methinks, but you saw through it. There is very little one can do in the circumstances and being hopeful that a 'certain relaxation' will occur is paramount.
Many thanks for perusing these musings of mine and commenting.

Luigi x


Brother Wind (posted on: 19-08-11)
Be praised, my Lord, through Brothers Wind and Air, and clouds and storms, and all the weather, through which you give your creatures sustenance. St. Francis of Assisi

St. Francis calls him Brother Wind, I would not be so complimentary. To me he's not a friend but a fiend and the reason for it is elementary. His behaviour is very unpredictable; one day he can be a gentle breeze, a zephyr whose softness is agreeable, at other times his icy blow can freeze. His mood is one of quick transition and it can be said he's true to form when, without the least monition, he transmogrifies into a storm. He can then upgrade to a cyclone which often brings torrential rain. I am certain that I am not alone in suffering at the hands of this bane. With increasing strength it can become a hurricane, a tornado or a typhoon to whose force we may succumb. And none of us can feel immune. He's been such an obnoxious guy that to call him brother isn't my wish. It is his wild behaviour that I decry: it can only be described as hellish. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Brother Wind
RachelLW on 19-08-2011
Brother Wind
Very good Luigi. I enjoyed it. I like the idea of the wind as a fiend. Rachel x

Author's Reply:
Hi Rachel, the Prose and Poetry challenge seems to inspire the contributors to produce their best. The quantity of input varies from week to week but the quality doesn't diminish in my opinion. This week's crop was abundant and fruitful as ever. I appreciated all pieces with their individual style.
Pleased that you enjoyed my effort, thanks.

Luigi x

RoyBateman on 21-08-2011
Brother Wind
Mm, odd thing wind. No, I won't go there! Seriously, depicting the wind as fiendish really works: perhaps of all weather features it's the most alarming, the thing we can do least about when caught in it. Good theme, Luigi, and well developed too.

Author's Reply:
Just passing by Roy, not stopping. Just a quick note to thank you for the comment.

Best, Luigi.


Modesty Blaise (posted on: 12-08-11)
Hero worship.

In our young days we only gave praise to girls who behaved like Modesty Blaise. She was superwoman, fearless and tough. We read her exploits but it wasn't enough. We wanted to embrace this person's ideal but knew all along that she wasn't real. She sprang from the pages of an evening paper that told us her story and recounted each caper. She had Willie Garvin, as her right-hand man. Of this individual I wasn't a fan. Though they were friends they never kissed; that was a chance I wouldn't have missed. I remained stubborn and would not be told that she was immortal but I would grow old. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Modesty Blaise
franciman on 12-08-2011
Modesty Blaise
Ah, the conceit of youth! What surprises me most is that you can remember that far back. Again I enjoyed the read.

Cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Cheers, Jim. Young people are fascinated by the thought of adventure and are influenced by what they read.
Vide Enid Blyton's 'The Famous Five' or 'The Secret Seven' or comics like 'Superman', 'Modesty Blaise', etc.
My memory goes a long way back. Thanks once again for reading and commenting.

sunken on 14-08-2011
Modesty Blaise
I always wondered who Modesty Blaise was, Luigi. I've heard the name but can't put a face to her or owt. Was she a cartoon character then? My mate dave fancies a cartoon character. I'm not sure if I'm comfortable with this. It seems odd to me. Perhaps I'm just old fashioned that way. I hope this has helped? Hello?

s
u
n
k
e
n

chips + steak = heaven

Author's Reply:
Mr Sunken, it was indeed a cartoon character. She was portrayed in comic strips, books and even films.


I attach a link with some good illustrations of the lady in question. (Hope it works)



http://www.modestyblaisebooks.com/artwork.html

it didn't work, trying again

See here - sorry still not working



A Keen Gardener (posted on: 12-08-11)
A colour-coordinated horticulturist.

John was a keen gardener but he was also a dandy. So having matching outfits proved to be rather handy. He had a green anorak and gloves of the same tint while the hue of his trousers was that of peppermint. In addition to all that he had the green wheelbarrow full of ripened manure to fertilize a green marrow. But when he bought a lamp to use in his allotment, that was just for the night, the colour was different. It wasn't emerald green as he would have wanted and by a bright canary yellow he was forever haunted. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for A Keen Gardener
franciman on 12-08-2011
A Keen Gardener
Is this Gawain's Green Knight, Luigi?

I enjoyed this.

cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
It could well be, Jim. He did come a lot (to the allotment that is).
Thanks for reading.

sunken on 14-08-2011
A Keen Gardener
Hello Mr. Luigi. This, like my toilet's cistern, has a lovely flow. I realise that, as analogies go, that seems a little derogatory. I can assure you that it wasn't meant to be. I shall prove this by slapping a smelly Bernard on ya. Top work, lovely rhymes and a quirky subject. It's quirky to me as I'm not much of a gardener. Stuff dies on me and shit. I'll shut up.

s
u
n
k
e
n

in noodles we trust

Author's Reply:
Mr Sunken, don't you worry: it is a lovely analogy. I am not much of a gardener myself but I'm told that shit aids the plants' growth so there is still hope. Sorry if I appear to be rambling but my mind is troubled because I cannot create a link that works. Cheers.

sunken on 14-08-2011
A Keen Gardener
Ahem. Sorry. As promised...



Author's Reply:
Ta very much.


Let's Start Again (posted on: 08-08-11)
An 'also ran' entry to an ABC competition.

He said: 'Let's start again and give me another chance.' I didn't see what he had to gain by leading me a merry dance. Did he think he could prevail like so many hopeful cheats? I was ready to draw a veil over his several deceits. As I heard his earnest plea, I felt sorry for his sighs, but he'd tried to mislead me and pulled wool over my eyes. Was I willing to carry on? Everyone would disapprove. I would have to avoid a con and observe every move. He was feeble, he was weak and his ego was deflated. I played him one more week: once again he was checkmated. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Let's Start Again
franciman on 08-08-2011
Lets Start Again
Hi Luigi,

Not for non-swimmers! It may look quite shallow but it has great depth. I love it.

Cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Thanks Jim, dive in: it is quite safe.

Cheers, Luigi.

sunken on 10-08-2011
Lets Start Again
Hello Mr. Luigi. A smashing poem. Perhaps I shouldn't use words like smashing in the current climate. Your command of da Engleesh language shines through on this one. Moochly enjoyed.

s
u
n
k
e
n



Author's Reply:
You are so right, Mr. Sunken, smashing seems to be the order of the day. And to think that about 12 miles from me, there have been riots in the centre of Manchester. It has destroyed my faith in human nature.
I hope you are on safer grounds.
On a more optimistic note, I am elated that you find this effort worthwhile and that Bernard seems to share your thought. Thanks to you both.

Best, Luigi.


Portrait of The Artist As A Decrepit Old Man (posted on: 01-08-11)
As time goes by.

I am always rebelling, never doing as I am told and am also cantankerous; I must be getting old. I am disorganised, wear mismatching socks; people think I'm joking and call me a wily fox. They whisper I exploit the colour of my hair, which is silver-grey, by using it as a snare. Pretending I'm decrepit, they argue, I cheat the girls. But when it comes to ladies I treasure them as pearls. They envy me the women that I know (and once knew); saying there are too many. I say they are too few. I know all the females in my street, at both ends, and can assure you that we're just good friends. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Portrait of The Artist As A Decrepit Old Man
RachelLW on 01-08-2011
Portrait of The Artist As A Decrepit Old Man
Very you. Very good. I enjoyed this, Luigi. I particularly liked the women treasured as pearls and the last stanza was a neat ending. Rachel x

Author's Reply:
Thanks Rachel, much appreciated. The remark about pearls was truly meant.

Luigi x

franciman on 01-08-2011
Portrait of The Artist As A Decrepit Old Man
Luigi, what a magnificent Renaissance Prince you would have made. Mio amico Amoroso!

Ciao,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Prince, Jim? I doubt it; I am not Machiavellian enough. But I will accept the 'amoroso' bit.

Grazie, Luigi.

RoyBateman on 04-08-2011
Portrait of The Artist As A Decrepit Old Man
Just good friends? Gerroff...you're never too old! Ouch, there goes me back again...perhaps I was wrong...

Author's Reply:
One has to keep up appearances, Roy, and that's what the good ladies appreciate. I intend to appear as often as I can as long as my back doesn't give way.

pdemitchell on 05-08-2011
Portrait of The Artist As A Decrepit Old Man
ciao luigi - you're only as old as the person you feel! Mitch (age 55 1/2)

Author's Reply:
Ciao Mitch. The hard part is finding someone to feel!
55 and a half? A mere suckling. (76 and counting).



The Unkindest Cut (posted on: 29-07-11)
Once upon a time.

The cost of being employed at the harem, according to the Emperor, was a snip but we know it was much more extreme. It was meant to discourage friendship with the royal wives or concubines who might still be feeling frisky. If they didn't observe the guidelines life for the eunuchs could be risky. Like the East, the West wasn't immune; young songsters didn't have a choice, when a musical piece contained a tune which required a male soprano voice, to sacrifice small parts of their anatomy. It doesn't take much imagination to see that this act precluded syngamy with no hope whatsoever of procreation. It isn't known when the custom began or whether it was a form of retribution but plainly it was an affront to man, a question that cried out for resolution. Fortunately those days are in the past and that kind of barbarism is obsolete; memories of that infamy are fading fast but there is no chance of a repeat. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for The Unkindest Cut
e-griff on 29-07-2011
The Unkindest Cut
nice pome, funny, tricksy rythm works well.

are you sure 'there is no chance'? I wouldn't bet on it.

johnG

Author's Reply:
Cheers John. In reply to your question: am I sure? No but I keep my legs crossed.

RoyBateman on 31-07-2011
The Unkindest Cut
Very amusing, as long as it involves somebody else! Can you imagine the job interview at the harem?
"Okay, chief, you got all the qualifications...except one..."
"Great! What do I have to do? WHAAT? Bloody hell, I'm off..."
Reminds me of "Christmas Day in the Harem", if you know it from "Oh, What a Lovely War" etc. A good laugh, as usual, and well-constructed too - you keep up a very high standard, Luigi!

Author's Reply:
Hi Roy. I didn't know that refrain from "Oh, What a Lovely War" and had to google it: "It was Christmas Day in the harem, the eunuchs were standing 'round, And hundreds of beautiful women were stretched out on the ground, Along came the big bad Sultan, and gazed on his marble halls, He said Whaddya want for Christmas boys, and the eunuchs answered tidings of co-omfort and joy, comfort and joy, o-oh ti-idings of comfort and joy". Priceless.
I was expecting something to rhyme with 'marble halls', as one does or at least someone with a one-track mind.
I'll try to keep up my high standard but it gets progressively difficult. No, titter ye not.

pdemitchell on 05-08-2011
The Unkindest Cut
Castrato castrato! The shimmering harem scare'em high notess brought on by two house-bricks and an aspirin. Nice form wi' nary a bollack dropped (or juggled) Mitch

Author's Reply:
Ouch, mitch! The thought of two bricks bring tears to my eyes. I expect that more than one aspirin would be required.


Alicia (posted on: 22-07-11)
End of the affair.

It all started with a film that I saw at the newly inaugurated multiplex. It was Love Story, with Ali McGraw; a poignant tale, that wasn't about sex. I was led to my seat by an usherette whose name, I later learnt, was Alicia. In the dark I could see her silhouette: her pale face reminded me of Morticia. Any resemblance to the Addams family disappeared when the lights came on. Her cheeks had been blushing steadily and the pallor on her face had gone. I asked her on a date and she said yes. We became good friends me and Ali but it didn't work out I must confess. Now I'm here in Blighty and she's in Bali. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Alicia
RoyBateman on 24-07-2011
Alicia
Well, that's what you get for going out with an usherette...come to think of it, do they still exist? More to the point, did you get as far as the main feature or did she stop you after the cartoons? Whoops, giving my age away there. Oh, and well done for rhyming "sex" with "multiplex" - now THAT'S original!

Author's Reply:
Hi Roy. It is so long since I last went to a cinema that I can't remember whether usherettes still exist; I believe not. Not only I got as far as the main feature, I even endured the trailers and the adverts by Pearl an Dean. That should give you an idea about my age.
When searching for a rhyme it isn't easy to find an original one and I'm glad that you think this one is appropriate.
Thanks for the comment.

stormwolf on 28-07-2011
Alicia
Loved it and the ending was so final and highlighted the way life goes.
I used to go to the cinema in the old days and get up to all sorts of mischief in the back row. Aye, life ain't what it used to be *sigh*
Alison x

Author's Reply:
I can imagine, dear Alison, the capers you got up to in the back row. And you are right: 'life ain't what it used to be', nowadays is more a case of 'chance would be a fine thing'. Still I haven't forgotten the good old days.
Glad you liked this, thank you.

Luigi x


The Little Black Book (posted on: 18-07-11)
For the sake of research.

I once had a little black book with more than the telephone number and address of past girlfriends; it also had the score that I assigned to each but I wish to stress that it was purely for reasons of statistic and not for sexual and salacious titillation. And as I wanted my research to be realistic I had to find passion and lust's correlation. I also needed to prove that I was able to be honest and impartial in my judgement. In order to do so I had to keep a table and jot down even the tiniest movement. Something went wrong in my investigation and reluctantly had to stop my note-taking when I was suddenly hit by a revelation: all this time my subjects had been faking. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for The Little Black Book
ifyouplease on 18-07-2011
The Little Black Book
such an unexpected conclusion, very Ionicus. nice!

Author's Reply:
It does happen, Nic, even though I may sound a bit cynical. Pleased you liked the poem and thanks for reading it.

Luigi x

stormwolf on 19-07-2011
The Little Black Book
hahaha That's what you get! I'll wager your little black book is stuffed full πŸ˜‰
Alison x

Author's Reply:
It's not a laughing matter, young lady! Have some consideration; what would you say if men were faking it?
That little black book has ceased to be useful. The names in it would now belong to grandmothers.

Luigi x

RachelLW on 22-07-2011
The Little Black Book
This is very good. I enjoyed it. A male friend of mine told me that he kept a record of lies women had told him - which I pointed out was possibly a symptom of madness and my partner tells me he has an excel spreadsheet record of all my bad behavior (I'm hoping he's joking) hence my hint at this in my poem Magpie). I suspect you're all at it! Rachel x

Author's Reply:
Now you know, Rachel, that you have to be on your best behaviour: Big Brother is watching you.
I had a look at 'Magpie' and this time I understood the reference to a spreadsheet, which had eluded me on a prior occasion.

Luigi x


The Old Bailey Lady (posted on: 15-07-11)
In response to the prompt word (SCALES) in Wednesday Prose/Poetry challenge.

She holds a pair of scales to show that she dispenses justice in equal measure to rogue males (or females) who committed offences to the Queen's displeasure. Weighing the pros and cons, examining the evidences, she balances the arguments. Having illicit liaisons or cheating on expenses she classes as abhorrent. She seems as good as gold so why am I a sceptic? Am I out of my mind? It is because her blindfold suggests she is myopic if not outright blind. I wouldn't be so diffident if she could only prove that she sees through lies and say that she's confident that she can remove the scales from her eyes. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for The Old Bailey Lady
franciman on 15-07-2011
The Old Bailey Lady
Luigi you old skeptic. On a personal level I'd rather trust the myopia of good old Justitia, than the fading, feckless faculties of the scaly curmudgeons who masquerade as judges.
A great piece of poetry and would have been a worthy winner but for another myopic judge!
Cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
It because of those old doddery and decrepit judges who come out with unbelievable judgements that makes me wary of old Justitia, Jim.
Very generous of you to praise this poem and I thank you. I can soak up all the flattery that comes my way.
Cheers.

RachelLW on 15-07-2011
The Old Bailey Lady
What a bloody cheek! I had my glasses on at the time of judging, I'll have you know, Jim. I liked all the poems. It's a tricky business deciding. Jokes aside, this is a great poem and well written. Rachel x

Author's Reply:
I understand you perfectly Rachel. When only one piece can be chosen the 'also ran' are bound to be disappointed. I am sure that Jim was talking tongue-in-cheek; he got the accolade after all.
Thanks for your favourable comment.

Luigi x

stormwolf on 16-07-2011
The Old Bailey Lady
You have a very personal style of writing that is instantly recognisable. You cover each subject with insight and a good dose of personality too πŸ˜‰
The way justice is going in this country she maybe should take the dam blindfold off!
Alison x

Author's Reply:
Dear Alison, every author on this site has his/her distinctive style and we wouldn't want it otherwise. Imagine if the writing was uniform throughout, how dull it would be. As it is we have a good and wide variety from the serious to the (dare I say it?) just plain daft. The main thing for me is not to place too much importance on our own contribution.
So, you too have noticed a certain deficiency in the justice system. It is rapidly going downhill in my opinion and the age of some geriatric judges has something to do with it.
Thanks for reading and commenting.

Luigi x

Beth on 17-07-2011
The Old Bailey Lady
I enjoyed your interpretation of justice the rhyme so subtle it hardly notices- I know how difficult that is to achieve, I agree with your sentiments as well - regards Beth

Author's Reply:
Hi Beth, nice to see you back. I am glad you liked my interpretation and that you are in agreement with its sentiments.
Thanks for reading and commenting.

Luigi x


An Unfinished Symphony (posted on: 11-07-11)
Mid-life crisis.

I will always associate Ravel's Bolero with Dudley Moore, Bo Derek and '10', the film describing the mid-life crisis and sexual fantasy of George Webber, a man envious of his neighbour's orgies which he witnesses through a telescope. Living with a straight-laced girlfriend, he looks at young girls in the vain hope of realising his libidinous objectives. He finally finds the girl of his dreams whom he rates at the top of the scale. She is extraordinarily good looking and could be the target of every male. To abridge and cut a long story short, though betrothed, in a Mexican hotel she agrees to his amorous advances; attempting to seduce him she asks: ''Did you ever do it to Ravel's Bolero?" This should be like a red rag to a bull and we would expect him to be a torero lancing with passion and be powerful. With the music blaring to a crescendo the aging Lothario isn't up to the task. Rather then andante, it is diminuendo; the symphony, alas, remains unfinished. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for An Unfinished Symphony
Romany on 14-07-2011
An Unfinished Symphony
Poor soul! The spirit was willing but the flesh was weak. I dimly remember bits of the film, but I don't think I really paid it too much attention and it was a long time ago now...

Romany.

Author's Reply:
You are absolutely right Sue about being a long time ago. It was a 1979 film and not many people will remember it, I'm sure. I thought it was a classic; very entertaining. Worth another look.
Thanks for reading and commenting.

Luigi x

stormwolf on 14-07-2011
An Unfinished Symphony
You are on a roll Luigi!
I don't know what you are taking but I want some. The use of the Italian (such a beautiful passionate language) highlights what you are saying.
Just brill for the want of a better word!
Alison x

Author's Reply:
How kind, Alison, thank you. It is no secret that I draw inspiration from all walks of life but most of all I get the best ideas listening to music. The sound of Ravel's Bolero reminded me of the 1979 film '10', among other things.
What better than explain the plot in a poem, I thought, especially for those who are not familiar with it?
As for what I'm taking, we don't want everyone to know so I shall whisper in your ear...

Luigi x


An Unmade Bed (posted on: 04-07-11)
...and reclining nudes.

I don't think much of Tracey Emin's art; of her unmade bed or the infamous tent inscribed with the names of all those she'd bedded to her heart's content. It's not that I am a prude or that I think it is rude to depict coition. I am just an admirer of the classical tradition. I'd rather see nudes by Rubens or by Titian. Those paintings are vibrant and exude sexuality but they are not so blatant. They leave a lot to the imagination. The Gioconda's smile might well be about the satisfaction that the model felt following a bout of physical action with the famous painter, but it isn't spelt out. So, in conclusion, I am clear in my mind and there is no confusion regarding the kind of Art I prefer. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for An Unmade Bed
Romany on 04-07-2011
An Unmade Bed
Couldn't agree more - well said!

Romany.

Author's Reply:
It's good to see somebody with the same viewpoint, Sue. Thanks for letting me know.

Luigi x

admin on 04-07-2011
An Unmade Bed
Oh I do so agree Luigi! Jeez, wish I could have made as much from myunmade bed!

Author's Reply:
But did you have a tent with a string of lovers' names? That would have added value to your unmade bed.

Luigi x

sunken on 06-07-2011
An Unmade Bed
I recently took delivery of a new bed, Mr. Luigi. I steered clear of memory foam as I didn't want reminding of all the nights I'll spend in it alone. It's very comfy tho.
So were those subjects of which you speak actually painted after the artist had rogered them? How wonderful. Like a celebration if you will. Tip top as ever. Well done on the nib. Commiserations on the Bernard.

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Author's Reply:
You don't want to spoil a new bed by sharing it with her especially if it is comfy, you can always make use of hers and if she proves difficult you can leave it unmade.
I believe that the inspiration for the tent came from said rogering but I have only her word for it. As my name is not on it, I have no way of checking it. If my name had been on it the value of the work might have increased by 50p.
Does Bernard write the names of the bitches he has entertained in his kennel, or is he more discreet?
Greetings to you and a woof to him.

RoyBateman on 07-07-2011
An Unmade Bed
Well said, mate - some day the "art" world will wake up to the fact that much of what's passed off as art nowadays is a few lucky and vastly over-rated con men/women cashing in on the gullibility of harebrained collectors. Well, if that useless modern paint flakes off the canvases leaving 'em with nothing, I say GOOD! SERVES YOU RIGHT, YOU MORONS!" I spent part of last monday revisiting Birmingham Art Gallery's wonderful Pre-Raphaelite collection. Compare that with Emin and Hurst? Don't get me started...


Author's Reply:
Roy, I always knew that you were a man of taste not likely to fall for any 'modern' fad. Some people nowadays have more money than sense and collect contemporary art. We'll see if it passes the test of time - like the classical, traditional, art - or whether the bubble will burst.

pdemitchell on 07-07-2011
An Unmade Bed
well nibbled, Luigi! As for Emin's unmade bed - I thought it was a self-portrait! Mitch

Author's Reply:
Self-portrait indeed, how cruel Mitch! If the number of lovers represented in her tent is anything to go by she must have had some attraction.

stormwolf on 14-07-2011
An Unmade Bed
Could not agree with you more Luigi. The classical nudes have class and beauty...today's society seems to home in on the shady seemy side of life.
I would never put a list of ex my lovers in a tent...it would lead to my mother's demise...and besides, my memory does not stretch that far back hehe
Alison x

Author's Reply:
Dear Alison, I am sure that your memory is as strong as ever. Don't tell me that you have forgotten the passionate moments and the lovers that generated them. You may not put their names in a tent but is there a little black book with a list of your exes and the scores allocated to each one? In this age of 'kiss and tell' it could prove profitable.
Good to hear that you too appreciate real art.

Luigi x


A Clever Plan (posted on: 24-06-11)
A risky strategy.

They said she was mad to even consider going out with a cad, a lewd libertine, a serial seducer for whom girls did fall, but naught could induce her to accept their advice. She thought she knew best and had this idea that she wanted to test; it was worth a try. She'd devised a plan which would hopefully work and she'd get her man, to cherish and to hold. It was a risky game to engage with someone that firstly she had to tame and finally subdue. She got on with the task. But did she succeed? You'll be tempted to ask and expect a reply. You can dispel your fears: they wed and have been married for nigh on thirty years and he didn't stray once. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for A Clever Plan
sunken on 26-06-2011
A Clever Plan
What's going on? No comments! Disgraceful! You have obviously found 'the one' my good fellow. You're a lucky man and she's a lucky woman. That doesn't mean I fancy you or owt. I'm just saying you're a lovely fella. I'll shut up and slap a Bernard on ya. So sorry you've had no comment on this. I can't think why. It flows beautifully.

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Author's Reply:
Hello Mr. Sunken. I expect that a lot of people have been doing what I did and that is watching the tennis at Wimbledon. It so time consuming and energy sapping (I sometimes am more exhausted than the players) that commenting is low on priority.
It is either that or the piece is rubbish but if Bernard says it is OK that's fine by me. The beagle has got taste.

RoyBateman on 26-06-2011
A Clever Plan
Well, there's a shock ending if ever there was one! All...well, maybe most, women think that they can change men to suit, and it seldom works as well as it has here, so good luck to her. My wife's still trying after nearly forty...I shall say no more!

Author's Reply:
Roy, they always try it on and I should know having been married for forty-five years. The secret is to let them think that we have been reformed and keep fingers crossed at the same time.


Wimbledon (posted on: 24-06-11)
New balls, please.

Tennis at Wimbledon consists of new balls, deuces and advantages, disputed line calls; of enthusiastic crowds, of strawberries and cream, of each and every player chasing a single dream. In the commentary box, you'll be pleased to know, there are names from the past like Pat Cash and McEnroe, Boris Becker, Sue Barker, Andrew Castle, John Lloyd and many famous guests that one cannot avoid. The Brits won the men's singles in 1936 (or was it '35?) and now they've Andy Murray to keep their hopes alive. Will he, won't he? Who knows. Let's just enjoy the game and, after two weeks, we'll learn the victor's name. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Wimbledon
admin on 24-06-2011
Wimbledon
It'll be Federer! Or Nadal. Not Murray!

Fred Perry won in '34, '35 and '36!

Lovely πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
You cruel woman! You'll break the British hearts.
I knew about Fred Perry but could not fit all the dates on one line.
Thanks for the read and comment.

Luigi x

stormwolf on 24-06-2011
Wimbledon
Well I ain't a Wimbledon fan myself but caught the feeling here.
I felt you could dispense with the repitition in the second stanza

(of )enthusiastic crowds,
(of) strawberries and cream,
(of) each and every player
chasing a single dream.

I think to keep rhythm on track could be

enthusiastic crowds,
strawberries and cream,
each (single)and every player
one single dream.

but the ball is in your court πŸ˜‰
Alison x

The repitition is intentional to highlight the single minded focus it needs and to keep the rhythm on track.


Author's Reply:
Unlike you, Alison, I am a keen tennis fans and my eyes were glued to the telly during the French Open and now Wimbledon. As for repetitions, as you say, the ball is in my court. What the deuce, let keep the original piece as it was set. It is, I believe, to my advantage to continue the game but I cannot match your critique.
See what watching tennis does to my brain?

Love, Luigi xx

sunken on 26-06-2011
Wimbledon
I think we all know why you're such a big tennis fan, Mr. Luigi. You utter cad. Of course ya know what's gonna happen don't cha? We'll get to the semi's if we're lucky and then lose to a superior player. It's the British way. Of course, he's only British when he's winning. As soon as he loses he reverts back to being Scottish. Cynic? Me? As if (-; Top write as ever, my good man. Well done.

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his fone is far smarter than him

Author's Reply:
So you've been told that I like watching the ladies! It is quite revealing; the other day there was a close match between a pair of red knickers and another in black and the red ones won.
I reluctantly switch over to the male players and although the matches are hotly fought they are not as pleasing to the eye as the female ones.
As we never call the Scottish play by its name as it is supposed to bring bad luck should one do the same for the Scottish competitor? It may make all the difference.
Nice talking to you.

RoyBateman on 26-06-2011
Wimbledon
I don't think I'll bother with new balls, thanks, as I'm still trying to wear the old ones out. Whoops, what a giveaway. Will he, won't he? I think we know already! You know, what handicaps Murray most, apart from his dreadful drony voice, is having to practice part-time while keeping on his day job, playing Marlon Dingle in "Emmerdale"...hasn't anyone else noticed?

Author's Reply:
At times a change of balls does wonders as does getting new equipment. Even with one's experience a competitor is bound to be slowed down considerably by wear and tear.
I have to confess that I am ignorant about Marlon Dingle and Emmerdale and am prepared to accept your word re. the similarity. Thanks for pointing it out.


Bibliophiles (posted on: 20-06-11)
Turning a new leaf.

They met in the library but it wasn't a date, it was a chance encounter. She, looking for Romance, had her head in the clouds and scouted many volumes searching for Mills & Boon. He had asked at the counter where he could find Adventure and yet, after being told, he was none the wiser; he could not find the place. With both of them being lost, it was not surprising that they came face to face. As they looked at each other, they immediately knew it was love at first sight. He'd found his ideal woman and she her Mister Right. We better draw a veil on what happened in the aisles of the Erotica section; it's sufficient to say she turned a new leaf and was proud of herself. She didn't want to be a spinster and be left on the shelf. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Bibliophiles
stormwolf on 20-06-2011
Bibliophiles
bravo! This made me smile....loved the way you wove it all together.
Better get myself down to the library πŸ˜‰
Alison x

Author's Reply:
What better place than the library to get an education? Don't miss the opportunity.

Luigi x

franciman on 20-06-2011
Bibliophiles
Luigi this is brilliant! I love the idea with library sections and cliches to match. It's like the hitman who went to the library to take out a book.

Cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Cheers Jim. Surely those books must have been 'hits'.

sunken on 20-06-2011
Bibliophiles
The old Luigi charm is alive and well I see. This is you at your best, my good fellow. A section of my local library was recently cordoned off with some of that highly visible police tape. I think there must have been a Jeffrey Archer book in the vicinity. No one should have to read that sort of crap. I'm rambling. I blame Dubstep. Top work fella.

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Author's Reply:
Mr Sunken, please don't mention that name again. How on earth he manages to get published I'll never know.
Still, you and I and good old Bernard know better, innit?
Thanks for your welcome comment.

PS I thought that I would use 'innit' now that it has made it into the Scrabble dictionary.

Zoya on 23-06-2011
Bibliophiles
Clever Luigi, clever! A Mills and Boons-reading-girl would of course marry an adventure-seeking-boy. There was this sister-in -law of mine who had a whole collection of Mills and Boons... I could never figure out how she could manage to devour such mindless stuff with so much gusto... I could hardly get past my first and the last one... though I was a heady teenager, just like her!
Love, zoya

Author's Reply:
Hello Zoya, how nice to hear from you. As you say, a romantic girl and an adventure-seeking-boy are well matched.
When it comes to reading, everyone has a preference and although you and I don't see much value in Mills and Boons, there are some people who derive much pleasure from them. I read practically everything as I can't judge a book by its cover, as they say, or by the blurb. Only after I've read it I can make my own assessment.
On the whole, I think it is good to have people reading than have them illiterate.

Love, as ever, Luigi.


A Northerly Breeze (posted on: 17-06-11)
Kisses and intimate embraces.

A northerly breeze brings a chill to the air but a pair of lovebirds, entwined in the twilight, don't care. They bask in the heat generated by kisses and intimate embraces. As the setting sun sinks in the ocean's expanse it modestly blushes at the sight of their capers and its reddish glow reflects in their faces. Now darkness descends and the zephyr blows harder. The nip in the air may cool the ardour of our lustful lovers who still have the choice to continue their affair in relative comfort in bed, under covers. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for A Northerly Breeze
Romany on 18-06-2011
A Northerly Breeze
Ah, a subject matter which entirely suits you Luigi! I like it when you write a more serious poem, if you know what I mean. You are good at it!

Romany.

Author's Reply:
Thanks for the vote of confidence Sue. It isn't always easy to find inspiration for a serious poem but I'll try my best to continue in this vein.

Luigi x

stormwolf on 18-06-2011
A Northerly Breeze
not as exciting in bed under covers...bugger the cold air That's what I say! πŸ˜‰
Alison x

Author's Reply:
I suspected that Scottish lasses were tough, Alison, and now I know.
Love al fresco, eh? It is a pity that I am unable to come to the UKA do otherwise I might have been tempted to test your resolve.

Luigi xx


Asterisks and Taboos (posted on: 10-06-11)
A puzzling riddle.

I couldn't fathom why some nouns had two asterisks in the middle. I perambulated with deep frowns trying to solve the puzzling riddle. No one had given me any indication that they were as infectious as germs. I tried many kinds of permutation before I came up with my own terms. I seem to have broken some taboos: I said flak and cent, on the stage. The audience responded with boos; perhaps a way of venting their rage. Maybe I didn't know what I was doing and what I said didn't make any sense. That was the reason they were booing: my lapsus linguae had been immense. For certain I shall be brought to book if I try to translate some other word. Saying c**k is synonymous with cook is tantamount to falling on one's sword. From now on I'll mind my Ps and Qs especially if there's a gap in between. If I transgress I won't have any excuse, I will have to confess and come clean. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Asterisks and Taboos
stormwolf on 11-06-2011
Asterisks and Taboos
Hi Luigi
I always suspected you had an immense lapsus linguae πŸ˜‰
Very funny and insighful too.
Alison x

Author's Reply:
Dear Alison, you'd be surprised at how immense it could be.

Luigi x

RachelLW on 11-06-2011
Asterisks and Taboos
This made me smile. Very funny. I intend to replace all asterisked words with innocuous ones. Wicker baskets, for example.

All the best,

Rachel

Author's Reply:
That'll do for a start, Rachel.

Cheers, Luigi.

Romany on 11-06-2011
Asterisks and Taboos
Highly original subject matter! Can I tentatively suggest 'fall' should be 'falling?'

Romany

Author's Reply:
You are quite right Sue, falling it is.

Luigi x

RoyBateman on 12-06-2011
Asterisks and Taboos
You know, Luigi, I've been struggling to work out what these offensive words might be...oh, all right, I'm fibbing - but wouldn't it be a dull world without such naughty ambiguities? It'd have put most of the great comedians of the past out of business, that's for sure!

Author's Reply:
Unlike those of today, the comedians of the past were masters of the double entendre. Max Miller and Frankie Howerd were expert at it.

sunken on 13-06-2011
Asterisks and Taboos
Hello Mr. Luigi. It's me, sunks. I can't help but notice that you haven't replied to your current crop of comments. This simply will not do. Your poem is, of course, tip top. It reminds of long lazy days eating cucumber sandwiches with a retro midget named Stan. This was of course prior to the Germans messing around with them! (The cucumbers I mean, not Stan). I blame the war. They never quite forgave us for beating them. I'm so glad we did tho. I didn't like that hitler fella. He only had one bollock ya know. I have two. Just saying. Ahem. Well done on the nib. Now, where's that beagle...

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Author's Reply:
My humble apologies, Mr. Sunken. I was away the whole weekend and I didn't have time to look at comments as I was trying to ascertain whether it was cucumbers or bean sprouts that the Germans were unleashing on us. I heard of weapons of mass destruction but this is ridiculous. I think we ought to retaliate with tomatoes.
Nice to hear from you and Bernard.


General Knowledge (posted on: 27-05-11)
It is quiz night at the 'Bull and Bush’.

It is quiz night at the 'Bull and Bush'. The venue is full of the finest brains; we manage to get in but had to push to grab a table away from the drains. The pub has got sawdust on the floor but the real ale the landlord serves more than makes up for lack of dιcor and it's the tonic to soothe the nerves. To win the contest is everyone's dream: free beer for a year is the coveted prize. There are four people in any one team (to have too many would seem unwise). We have Jonathan, a Doctor of Science, a good degree we have to acknowledge, then there is Barry who, with defiance, admits he has never attended college. Yet he is a genius at general knowledge. He has an uncanny long-term memory, every minutia is recorded as an image - his mind is like an unending library. Charlotte and I make up the numbers and very frequently we haven't a clue. It may well be our presence encumbers the brilliant efforts of the other two. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for General Knowledge
stormwolf on 28-05-2011
General Knowledge
I am sure you have much to add dear Luigi πŸ˜‰
You caught the scene well although I have to say I have never been to one of those sawdust places,
Alison x

Author's Reply:
Dear Alison, I can't imagine a refined lady like you frequenting a low dive like that. It is a place just for blokes.
You might ask what Charlotte is doing there. Well, she's though; she is one of the boys.

Luigi x

Andrea on 29-05-2011
General Knowledge
Hey, Luigi, you forgot the spittoon in the corner!

Down at the ol' Bull and Bush, eh? Nice!

Author's Reply:
So I did, Andrea. I was so absorbed by the quiz that I missed some of the details.

Luigi x

RoyBateman on 30-05-2011
General Knowledge
Free beer for a year, and real ale at that?? Where do I sign on? I always enjoy pub quizzes, but there's ALWAYS some bugger who knows the sports answers that have me flummoxed. Bastard. Great laugh, Luigi - very well observed!

Author's Reply:
Roy, I believe there is a waiting list (longer than for council houses) of people wanting to sign on. Not for the free beer but to display their knowledge. And if you believe that....
You are so right about those know-alls: I am still pondering the question while some clever clog comes up with the right answer in a second. Mind you he is not so hot when it comes to literature! But yet again there'll be someone else who gets there before me. I must hone my reflexes.


Cynicism (posted on: 20-05-11)
My entry to this week's Forum Challenge.

When I hear a politician waxing lyrical about his achievements, I become cynical. He promises the earth to get your vote but once he is selected he'll forget what he wrote in his election manifesto. He will swing the axe and go back on his pledge to reduce income tax. He says we are in a fix and has the temerity to suggest that we need a period of austerity. That things have to change is the name of the game and yet we can see that they remain the same. He'll want his expenses and a salary increase and he'll achieve those with relative ease. This unfair situation is seen by some as knavery and the double standard as totally unsavoury. Hotheads may react with fierce antagonism but I content myself with smug cynicism. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Cynicism
Andrea on 20-05-2011
Cynicism
Ah, how true!
It always amazes me that the majority of the UK pop seem convinced there are but 3 parties to vote for. So nothing ever changes. ConLabLib, LabLibCon, LibConLab, ad-bloody-infinitum.

Author's Reply:
How right you are, Andrea. It amazes me that some people always vote for the same party because their fathers and grandfathers did, without any regard to what is good for the country. They will eventually change their mind when they get fed up with the Government of the time. It would be much better if the candidates were independent without political affiliation. Perhaps I am too naive.

dylan on 20-05-2011
Cynicism
Bravo, Luigi!
Billy Connolly once said that the desire to become a politician should immediately bar that person from becoming one!

Orrabest,

D.

Author's Reply:
Many a true word is spoken in jest, Jon. Billy Connolly echoed my sentiments and I am glad that I am not the only cynic.

Cheers, Luigi.

RoyBateman on 21-05-2011
Cynicism
Well, Luigi, no thinking person can help being cynical with our current crop of MPs...it's truly amazing, and hypocritical, that so few have been jailed. We can only hope that a few more - and at least two top LibDems - get what they deserve. And to think that "nice" Mr Clegg came across (to the gullible) as Mr Clean before the election. Still, a few eyes have been opened since, eh?
It always amazes me that so many apparently intelligent peole forget the basic rules: 1) If you've got your fingers in the till, be subtle about it...and not TOO greedy. 2) If you've asked your missus to do a bit of aiding and abetting, don't dump her!

Author's Reply:
Is it my imagination or it is getting worse, Roy? I seem to remember the time when MPs used to resign if found to have brought the House into disrepute. Now every peccadillo is rewarded with a Cabinet post.
As for their salaries and expenses, it isn't as if they are starving: I used to live on a third of their salaries and if I had asked for expenses my boss would have laughed in my face.
Still, they are a superior breed, aren't they?
*asks he with a smirk*

Romany on 22-05-2011
Cynicism
Me too! This reminded me, somewhat cynically I suppose, of how some romance are similar to a politician's connivances; empty promises, seduction and flattery, then cool indifference after they've got what they want.

Yes change is the name of the game, but don't hold your breath...

Author's Reply:
Quite true Sue, it could be that every man is a politician in disguise. I suppose that in this age of equality we ought to include women in this category. Is it possible that females have reneged on their promises? I can't possibly comment.

Luigi x

stormwolf on 23-05-2011
Cynicism
well said Luigi
I guess I would be one of the hotheads as it makes my blood boil. Look what's happening in Spain though. Coming to a town near you soon! πŸ˜‰ Congrats on the nib an' all.
Alison x

Author's Reply:
Hi Alison. Stormy by name and stormy by nature. I can visualise you at the front of a demonstration waving a placard demanding fairness and justice. Yes, there seems to be a lot of unrest in many places mainly due to economic reasons and obviously the behaviour of our 'betters' doesn't make the situation any easier.

Luigi x


Sheffield, April 30th (posted on: 02-05-11)
Poetry in motion.

I came to Sheffield with the notion that inside its famous snooker hall I would surely see poetry in motion; then, written on Hallam Uni's wall, I saw Andrew Motion's poetry welcoming the visitors to the city. Its verses were in perfect symmetry and had lines of the highest quality. The poem, visible from the station, is about the transience people feel when visiting the vast conurbation that is known as the city of steel. The title of this work is ''What if'': it urges us 'to greet and understand what lies ahead' but one may sniff at a concept that we need to expand. Imagine the snooker championship that's taking place at the Crucible. You would expect fair sportsmanship but the partisan crowd may quibble. There'd be no greeting from the fans for the rival of one's favourite player should he upset the best laid plans; understanding would be rather rare. Very few would accept this panacea meant to engender a good rapport yet it is an admirable, worthy, idea that we'd be irresponsible to ignore. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Sheffield, April 30th
RoyBateman on 02-05-2011
Sheffield, April 30th
Blimey, Luigi, you must have caught Andrew Motion's poem on a good day...I went to Hallam a few times when the Sheffield Beer Festival was there, but it seemed a forbidding 60's gloom-hole. Perhaps it's improved! I'll look out whyen next I visit - there are some cracking pubs, if the snooker fails to impress!

Author's Reply:
Roy, I don't know when you were there and, being my first visit, I can't comment on how it might have looked at the time but on this occasion I was really impressed by Sheffield. It looks as if the city has been improved with EU funding and the result looked to me very satisfactory. Apart from Andrew Motion, poets like Ian McMillan, Roger Gough and others have also contributed to mural poetry and I believe that Harold Pinter wrote a poem (Laughter) for the Off The Shelf festival.
The good weather also played a part in making an enjoyable visit.


Pen Pal (posted on: 11-04-11)
Ex communication.

My pen pal stopped writing. What can the matter be? I've told a few white lies, perhaps she's rumbled me. She asked how old I was, I answered: twenty-three. The question that followed made my body tingle: was I by any chance married? I replied that I was single. I embellished my CV and let the myth burgeon, saying I was a consultant; in fact a neurosurgeon. I thought that she'd think I was a total bore if I told her that I'd been in the Second World War. She would therefore see how old I really was. And if she asked 'why?' I could only say 'because'. I've found out the reason why the post petered out: the twenty-year old widow was in truth an old trout. Maybe she had believed that she was evergreen and had not expected a card from the Queen. Having at last become another centenarian, didn't want to admit to being a proletarian. I was facing a dilemma now I knew the truth, should I write to her saying I'd been uncouth? Considering we both lied could I say each was bound to feel slighted and claim the moral high ground? I haven't got an answer to something so profound. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Pen Pal
pdemitchell on 11-04-2011
Pen Pal
Hi Luigi! I am reminded of an anonymnous toast: β€œI would like to make a toast to lying, stealing, cheating and drinking. If you're going to lie, lie for a friend. If you're going to steal, steal a heart. If you're going to cheat, cheat death. And if you're going to drink, drink with me!” Bottoms up! Mitch πŸ™‚


Author's Reply:
Right on cue, Mitch. I'll join you in that toast. Thanks for reading and commenting.

stormwolf on 19-04-2011
Pen Pal
Another poem to make us think and laugh too Luigi.
I always say that honesty is the best policy. ha ha
Alison x (40yrs and holding, holding! )

Author's Reply:
I appreciate your honesty, Alison. Thanks for telling me you are 40 and that, if I understand you correctly, you intend to remain 40 from now on. Now you have spoiled it: quite honestly, I thought you were a young 20-year old!

Luigi x

PS Have you noticed that this site has become like the Marie Celeste of late? There was a time when you could count the 'hits' in hundreds.


Stimulus (posted on: 08-04-11)
***

A blank PC screen, a slow ticking clock and a persistent rain; they all combine to mock a poor, unhappy author who has writer's block. To lose one's inspiration is an unexpected shock. Bereft of new ideas he's been rendered tremulous so now he turns to something that always gave him stimulus. Another cup of coffee and another cigarette may waken the Muse and he'll no longer fret. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Stimulus
royrodel on 10-04-2011
Stimulus
I find walking about in bare feet helps
never wrote on a blank pc screen
I got myself a dictafone


Author's Reply:
Bare feet, eh? Anything is worth a try.
I tried writing on a blank screen but I had to use Tippex whenever I made a mistake and it was too messy.
A dictafone is perhaps a better proposition. Cheers.

pdemitchell on 11-04-2011
Stimulus
Radio and note pad... a snatch of altered lyric to an old hit can seed a gem or two... I pile up words so that I have 50 A4 seed poems but no time to work them up ie just now "dust mites, unseen mattress tides - clog my shredded lungs with shedded skin" Ciao Mitch πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Absolutely true, Mitch, the ideas are all around us; the problem is to give them cohesion and meaning.
Nice to hear from you.


Cryptic Crossword (posted on: 04-04-11)
Puzzling it out.

I like solving cryptic crosswords, and learn to use lateral thinking. I can do them with my eyes shut and all the time remain unblinking. One can add to one's vocabulary musical terms like diminuendo, allegro, andante and con brio but also an unintentional innuendo. You'll see double meanings galore in every clue you'll come across; if you are asked to name a 'bird' do you answer Jane or albatross? It isn't the fault of the compiler: think seriously and you will find that the puzzle is unambiguous but you have a one-track mind. One hasn't got to be devious or be an expert on convolution yet one has to use imagination in order to arrive at a solution. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Cryptic Crossword
royrodel on 05-04-2011
Cryptic Crossword
brilliant

Author's Reply:
Cheers royrodel. It is quite a compliment from an accomplished lyricist like you. Many thanks.

RoyBateman on 06-04-2011
Cryptic Crossword
Luigi, you put me to shame - I just haven't the patience for cryptic crosswords, though the missus eats 'em up. I do love what the Telegraph calls "quick" ones, though they don't always get solved quickly. Mind you, I am a great killer sudoku fan - but that's not very literary, is it? Wry, witty ode as always, and great fun to read!

Author's Reply:
Horses for courses, as they say, Roy. Sudoku doesn't do anything for me while I can't resist the challenge of cryptic crosswords. Perhaps I am being sentimental as they have earned me more money (in the much maligned DM) than my poetry ever did. If I could solve the poetic conundrum, i.e. how to make it profitable, as easily as I do what in Italy we call 'cruciverba' I would be set for life. As it is I remain a dilettante.
Thanks for reading and commenting.


Regeneration (posted on: 01-04-11)
Based on a suggestion by Footsie, on ABCtales, to "write an interesting story that had no human characters at all (and no anthropomorphising either!)"

It might have been a plough that cut the worm in two and now there is a cow who doesn't know who's who or rather which is which. She could put it together with just one single stitch but, alas, they won't let her. She's lacking the know-how to heal a wounded worm so she has to say 'Ciao' to the writhing infirm. The vermicular creature realises it's not alone: it recognises the feature of a genetic clone. It is rather spiffing to have a son and heir for when it comes to digging they can work in pairs. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Regeneration
teifii on 02-04-2011
Regeneration
That made me chuckle and it really does answer the challenge.

Author's Reply:
Thanks Daff, much obliged to you. At last a lady with a sense of humour. We seem to have run out of commentators of late.

Luigi x

stormwolf on 03-04-2011
Regeneration
Well I think this is spiffing as you say!
Very cleverly done indeed. There does seem to be a dearth of commentators on the go. This poem desrves more recognition!
Alison x

Author's Reply:
You have perked me up no end, dear girl. Your support is greatly appreciated as is the generous rating. Thanks.

Luigi x


Float Like A Butterfly (posted on: 25-03-11)
Being the judge of this week's Prose/Poetry challenge, and ineligible as a competitor, this is the entry that I would have submitted. The key was word PUNCH

''Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee.'' That was the battle cry of Muhammad Ali. I have a strong hunch that he wasn't a bard but he could pack a punch that caught one off guard. He and Foreman met in Kinshasa, Zaire; a fight that from the onset attracted a big cheer. It was Rumble in the Jungle and he devised a plan so that he wouldn't crumble against a younger man. The use of rope-a-dope was a clever strategy. It meant that he could cope by saving his energy. He leant back on the ropes and made his rival miss. Foreman, who had great hopes had not expected this. He'd have to surrender at the end of the day and it wasn't the pretender who had feet of clay. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Float Like A Butterfly
TPILB on 25-03-2011
Float Like A Butterfly
An epic fight, just wish boxing could still be like those glory days. Today the β€˜Pac Man’ Manny Pacquiao is still such a contender, and soon to fight Sugar Shane Mosley, but shame it’s not in the category of the heavy weights, as I always felt that were the warriors.

Really enjoyed the ending, nice wording.

TPILB


Author's Reply:
They don't make them as they used to, TPILB. There was an aura about Cassius Clay/Muhammad Ali and one could not help being fascinated by this larger than life, but likeable, character.
Much obliged for your comment and generous rating.

Best, Luigi.

discopants on 26-03-2011
Float Like A Butterfly
Ali might not have been a bard but he was a great communicator.

The poem have a nice rhythm, bobbing along and I particularly like the last line- I see what you did there!

Author's Reply:
He was indeed a great communicator, Keith. There wasn't anyone on this earth who didn't know that he was the greatest, a message that he continually conveyed. It wasn't just an empty boast and it is true that he was a giant among boxers. Glad that you liked the poem and thrilled that you spotted the play on words in the last line. Thank you for reading and commenting.


The Census (posted on: 21-03-11)
An updated version.

Though there wasn't a unanimous consensus it was decreed that we should have a census. You know that I am not inclined to boast but as soon as I received it through the post I opened the form, digested it and completed it. I hate leaving things till the last moment so I paid prompt attention to the document. I grant you that I may not have filled one bit and that was box seventeen which, I'm told, was left blank on purpose for every household. The form is not due, I'm ahead of the game; I can provide gender, ethnicity and the name of each and every guest that will be with me: on March the 27th there'll be twenty-three. Two are Indian, two African, two from Bengal some are from South America but that's not all. Two are hot Latin types, others have cold blood and we have got together because of the Flood. We'll also have a representative from France and I expect she will lead me a merry dance. Though we haven't met, she knows I'm Noah; (and I have been told that she is a proper goer). We all have been paired off and that's that; let's hope we don't get stuck on Mount Ararat. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for The Census
stormwolf on 21-03-2011
The Census
haha sounds like a lively night! I have my cencus form here so better bite the bullet and fill the damn thing in ;-(
You have your own style of poetry Luigi I think I would know it anywhere.
Alison x

Author's Reply:
Dear Alison, we all have our individual style and as we regularly read each other's work we can easily recognise the author. There can be no mistaking the input of Albermund or the comic creations of Roy Bateman and Footsie, all very characteristic. It would be an interesting exercise to post anonymously and try to guess who wrote what. Anyway the important thing is to be read.

Luigi x

sybarite on 22-03-2011
The Census
You've a knack for finding the poetry in our everyday lives Luigi. I take it there is a census being done in the UK? Most curious now as to what box seventeen wants?

Wonderful, as always.

Hugs
Teri

Author's Reply:
Hi Teri. I find everyday occurrences a rich font of inspiration, especially the funny ones. You are correct in assuming there is a census here in the UK. As for box seventeen only the Office for National Statistics knows: it simply states 'This box has been intentionally left blank'. No explanation given.
As the census is not a novel idea and goes back to Roman times, I thought why not use the Noah's Ark as a setting? Glad you like this parody.

Luigi xxx


The Wait (posted on: 11-03-11)
My entry to this week's Forum challenge. Prompt word: Wait.

Although oceans apart two women share the pain. Betrayed by their lovers they wait for them, in vain. One, standing on the Cobb, directs her eye to France with grim determination and a resolute stance. Impervious to the rain that is pelting the quay, she hopes to spot a vessel but sees an empty sea. The other, in Japan, a fluttering butterfly by the name of Ying Huang, was left high and dry. Every day she looks -against the voice of reason- for a funnel to appear on the distant horizon. Both girls will not accept that the lovers took flight. You may be asking questions on hearing of their plight. Do the scoundrels return? What is the women's fate? If you don't read their stories you'll have to speculate. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for The Wait
Bradene on 11-03-2011
The Wait
I thought this was a really good take on the theme Luigi as I said on Wednesday. I read somewhere I am sure, that the French Lieutenents Woman was inspired by another novel by Clair de Duras, which I haven't read myself but Ienjoyed reading this again. Valx

Author's Reply:
You are absolutely right, Val. It was based on Claire's novel Ourika which John Fowles translated from French into English. I haven't read it either so I can't comment on how much The French Lieutenant's Woman owes to the original. The 'wait' of the first woman in my poem comes indeed from the beginning of that story, whilst the second is, as you pointed out, from Madam Buttefly. Thanks for reading and commenting.

Luigi x

stormwolf on 11-03-2011
The Wait
Well done Luigi. I could see them both there in my minds eye. Hope they threw in the towel and found someone nearer home lol
Alison x

Author's Reply:
Ah, that's the $64,000 question, dear Alison. What would have you done in their shoes? I think I know the answer. In my make-believe world everybody lives happily ever after but reality doesn't always oblige.

Luigi x

TPILB on 11-03-2011
The Wait
L – I enjoyed your β€˜wait’ theme; more so the eternal sentiment, no room for β€˜pause’ here. Could even be the same salty sea dog for both women?
TPILB


Author's Reply:
Different sea dogs, TPILB, but similar scenarios. Mind you, I could imagine a well travelled seaman going from one location to another and have a woman in every port. Thanks for the suggestion.

franciman on 11-03-2011
The Wait
Hi Luigi,

This gave one old sea dog cause to pause. I never could take to Pinkerton and not just because he was a Yank.
This piece stayed with me a while.

Cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
I hope that you didn't leave damsels crying their eyes out in any port, you old sea dog. I could never associate Pinkerton with Cio-Cio-San once I learnt that he was a private detective (and Scottish).

Best, Luigi


The Larkin Twins (posted on: 07-03-11)
Seeing double or an optical illusion?.

You seem surprised and you think it's odd that Philip and I are like peas in a pod. There is a simple explanation : I am his twin. Anatomically similar, apart from the chin. He is a renowned poet and, on the whole, one would say that he has a sensitive soul. I studied his work minutely, word by word, but not all of his poems strike a chord. ''They fuck you up, your mum and dad…'', he wrote, and I find this statement very sad. He claimed that he found intercourse in '63 and I'm certain it was meant to shock me. He doesn't know I preceded him by ten years or else he would be shedding bitter tears. While he is superior to me as an intellectual in practical matters he is quite ineffectual. Among his drawbacks, as I found to my cost, he has no sense of direction and we get lost. He missed a turning on the way to Memphis and we ended up on the banks of the Tigris. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for The Larkin Twins
franciman on 07-03-2011
The Larkin Twins
Excellent Luigi,

Your closer to your twin than you make out!! I really enjoyed this.

Cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
I wish, Jim, but thanks for the kind words. Nice to hear you enjoyed this.

TPILB on 07-03-2011
The Larkin Twins
Enjoyed the 'rivalry' -capitulated finely, and showed avenge –Nice...

Author's Reply:
First of all, welcome to the site TPILB. Secondly, many thanks for reading and commenting. Cheers.

stormwolf on 08-03-2011
The Larkin Twins
well done again Luigi!
Alison x

Author's Reply:
I see what you mean, Alison. The 'Great Read' icon was a late arrival but a nice surprise nevertheless.



Luigi x

dylan on 08-03-2011
The Larkin Twins
Bravo, Luigi!
The bold Philip would approve, I`m sure.
You have a real gift for wry, humourous work.
Orrabest,
D.

Author's Reply:
Coming from an accomplished poet like yourself, Mr. Dylan, this is quite a compliment. Would Philip have been so magnanimous? It would be nice to think so.
Many thanks for your comment.

Cheers, Luigi.


''I Know Nothing'' (posted on: 04-03-11)
As seen on TV. An unforgettable character.

Years ago there was a comic actor on TV whose antics used to amuse and tickle me. He played a dumb waiter named Manuel who worked for a boss who gave him hell. One could not dislike his screen persona who hailed, as he said, from Barcelona. Whenever he was addressed by the boss he appeared mystified and at a loss. His English was limited and that's why quite frequently Ώquι? was his reply. He was not one to spring and prance and walked all the time as if in trance. When his employer asked him something he would simply answer: ''I know nothing.'' © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for ''I Know Nothing''
Bradene on 04-03-2011
I Know Nothing
Loved this Luigi, was my pick last Wed' Love Valx

Author's Reply:
Hi Val. Yes, I noted your positive response in the Forum and I'm grateful. You are a pal.

Luigi x

sybarite on 04-03-2011
I Know Nothing
Wonderful portrayal of Manuel. He is my favorite character in Fawlty Towers. My favorite episode is the one where they wall over the door to the dining room.

Author's Reply:
Hello syb. I believe that every episode was a gem but for me Manuel was the star of the show.
Thanks for stopping by.

Luigi x

Capricorn on 06-03-2011
I Know Nothing
When I read the title - I didn't expect the poem to be about Manuel. I'd forgotten that was his catch phrase.
Loved this poem!

Eira

Author's Reply:
Hi Eira. I wasn't quite sure whether 'ΒΏquΓ©?' or 'I know nothing' was his catch phrase but I plumped for the latter because I remembered his guilty look when denying he had done anything wrong. Either well define a character bamboozled by his surroundings. A comic genius.

Luigi x

shadow on 06-03-2011
I Know Nothing
'I know nozzing' - that's my catchphrase too. Loved this - brought back happy memories.

Author's Reply:
Quite right, Moya. Deny everything to be on the safe side. Manuel must have made a strong impression: I had a comment from a young lady who remembers watching the programme when she was six or seven years of age. Pleased that it brought back happy memories and thanks for reading.

Luigi x


Coetrine (posted on: 28-02-11)
'Because of her background as a nude model, Croetine was forced to spend an extraordinarily long time as a novice before being allowed to proceed to final vows.' - from 'Fierce Invalids Home From Hot Climates' by Tom Robbins.

Croetine's tangled life will go down in history: she had a reputation, she modelled in the nude, she was forever boasting that she wasn't a prude. Nevertheless, to us, she would remain a mystery. We were always aware she had a chequered past. She was a libertine - that was the official version - so we were taken aback by news of her conversion. We appreciated then that she had been typecast. Tom Robbins informed us that she became a nun yet forced to wait long time before taking the veil. In her heart she knew that her faith would not fail but to be kept dangling can't have been much fun. The reason why she remained for so long in limbo was that she was notorious for her wild behaviour. Although she was seeking the help of the Saviour, she was still considered an empty-headed bimbo. © Luigi Pagano
Archived comments for Coetrine
Jolen on 28-02-2011
Coetrine
A quirky twist on a serious theme, and one that makes me both sad and giggle. We need more libertines, less nuns, imo. LOL As usual, you've given it to us with flair. I enjoyed this poem, Luigi, but I won't be converting. LOL

love to you,
jolen



Author's Reply:
Dear Jolen, I quite understand your reluctance to convert but, as a favour to me, couldn't you dress as a nun?
On a serious note, it is always a pleasure to hear from you. I value your unbiased opinion and thank you for your comment.

Lots of love, Luigi

Elfstone on 28-02-2011
Coetrine
I hadn't heard of Croetine, but I now know that's because she didn't exist ;). A neat little story here Ionicus. Elfstone.

Author's Reply:
That's right young Elf, she only exists in Tom Robbins's novel. Do, please, pay attention! I can be a right martinet, you know.
Thanks for reading and commenting.

Luigi x

stormwolf on 01-03-2011
Coetrine
A very entertaining poem with the usual Luigi flourish! As one who 'sat' for an artist in my birthday suit aged 46 I felt I had something in common with her but I never went down the nun route. πŸ˜‰

The offending piece has pride of place now down the back of the wardrobe ;-(
Alison x

Author's Reply:
Alison, how could you? That masterpiece should have pride of place on your wall for art connoisseurs like me (and Shy) to appreciate. If you send me a photo of said piece I'll give you my critical assessment and let you know if the right strokes were applied.
It grieves me to learn you never went down the nun route and perhaps we ought to draw a veil over it.

Luigi x

Bradene on 03-03-2011
Coetrine
A very nice cameo of the novel, you are very good at this sort of thing Luigi. Well done. Valx

Author's Reply:
Thanks for your kind comment Val.

Luigi x

TPILB on 09-03-2011
Coetrine
Great addition - I recall meeting a Nun by observation' (Only) in a PAP Supermarket - (Haiti) 2008, a scared memory; inside her basket: Vaseline and Red Bull (x 2 for the latter), and yes, I resisted; just...

Author's Reply:
The mind boggles, TPILB. I bet you were intrigued by her purchases but you were too polite to ask. I have my own theories but...
Thanks for reading and commenting.


An Eye For An Eye (posted on: 25-02-11)
I wouldn’t call it vengeance, I’d call it retribution. (From the VENGEANCE challenge in the Forum, slightly edited).

I wouldn't call it vengeance, I'd call it retribution for one who did me wrong in not telling the truth. I shall follow religiously what it says in Leviticus : Fracture for fracture, eye for eye, tooth for tooth. As he has injured the other, so he is to be injured. His underhand behaviour really made me bristle, I'm full of indignation and my pride is wounded ; I'll take him to a tribunal and claim unfair dismissal. My sin was to expose malpractice and corruption, they called me a traitor, a snitch, a whistleblower. They made my life a misery with offensive remarks and then my boss decided that my career was over. But I shall not rest until the culprit is punished; I am not really bothered about the compensation, what I am really after is redressing an injustice and that a just verdict restores my reputation. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for An Eye For An Eye
sybarite on 26-02-2011
An Eye For An Eye
Well! Remind me not to get on your bad side! Just the right amount of injustice--could have easily gone overboard but you've kept it reigned in to righteous indignation.

Hugs
Teri

Author's Reply:
You got nothing to fear Teri. I rarely express my indignation unless it is a major transgression and then I let rip. I appreciate your fairness and diplomacy when it comes to comments. Many thanks.

Luigi xx


Love At First Bite (posted on: 21-02-11)
Not what I initially thought.

I was expecting tender loving care when she said she would give me TLC. I wondered whether such fine fare was reserved exclusively for me. I was on the rebound and felt fragile, in need of love and companionship. She was understanding and tactile, touching my nose with her fingertip. I had not anticipated the big sandwich I was presented with after my slumber. The one that she got from the fridge had tomato, lettuce and cucumber. I realised I'd misjudged the situation and promptly I came back to reality. It was a case of wrong interpretation and it all hinged on the initials TLC. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Love At First Bite
Romany on 21-02-2011
Love At First Bite
Reminds me of a friend who gets frequent text messages from (one of) his ex wives. He kept showing me where she had signed off 'lol,' which he assured me meant 'lots of love.' I didn't have the heart to tell him that in text speak it actually means 'laugh out loud!'

He'll figure it out one day I'm sure...

Romany

Author's Reply:
Hi Sue, I sympathise with the poor bloke; for a long time I was baffled by the initials that defined some organisations i.e. OECD, ECHR etc. and I was even more confused when they entered the common language.
It took me a while to unravel the meaning of BTW, OMG, LOL, LMAO, GSOH and the like.
And now that I figured it out I expect plenty of LOLs for my humourous pieces.
Thanks for the comment.

Luigi x

franciman on 21-02-2011
Love At First Bite
Nice One Luigi,

Never trust a vegetarian!

Cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Hi Jim, good to hear from you. Good advice, thanks.

Luigi.

chrissy on 21-02-2011
Love At First Bite
To my shame it actually took me almost a couple of seconds to figure this out. My mind is not where it should be but I found this very amusing when the penny finally dropped.
chrissy

Author's Reply:
Hello chrissy, the important thing is that you got there in the end and understood the pun. Glad you found it amusing and thank you for letting me know.

Luigi x

Bradene on 21-02-2011
Love At First Bite
Lovely, very funny I thought. well up to and even beyond your usual high standard. Valx

Author's Reply:
So kind Val, many thanks. Hope you are keeping well.

Luigi xx

sybarite on 21-02-2011
Love At First Bite
Well done. The humor is well crafted and understated. TLC will never mean the same to me!

Cheers
Teri
xo

Author's Reply:
Never mind Teri, I will have to think of other initials to enable you to keep the romance going. In the meantime, without using shorthand, I send you warm wishes.

Luigi xx

Elfstone on 21-02-2011
Love At First Bite
A real Luigi classic this one - very much enjoyed. Elf.

Author's Reply:
Glad to have made an impression, Elf. Cheers.

Luigi xx

stormwolf on 21-02-2011
Love At First Bite
Don't know how I missed this one. Well done Luigi Alison x

Author's Reply:
Go on, admit it. You only looked at this one after it got a mark of approval, i.e. a nib (for which I'm grateful, pickers). Seriously though, I know that it is easy to overlook something when there are many entries.
Thanks very much stormy one.

Luigi xxx

RoyBateman on 24-02-2011
Love At First Bite
Most amusing, Luigi: I'm not sure that I've ever seen "cucumber" rhymed before, and it certainly made me smile. I really don't know why, because I detest the things, but there you go. Next time, demand something more meaty...you never know what you might get!

Author's Reply:
I did exactly what you suggest, Roy, only to be told that my demands were 'fishy'. Let's face it, we can never win. The reason that you have never rhymed the word 'cucumber' could be psychological and due to the fact that you detest the things. I must say that this admission has destroyed my idea of an English gentleman whom I have always associated with cucumber sandwiches. Thanks for reading and for your always helpful suggestions.


Bigger Bognor (posted on: 21-02-11)
Could he have been misheard?

The story goes that George the Fifth was in his bed in Bognor Regis - a town that was under his aegis - gravely ill and about to expire. He was put out and feeling sorry but he was told he needn't worry: he'd soon recover and could return to this beloved seaside resort. The King had been quite taciturn but on hearing this he went berserk. Was heard to utter a sharp retort delivered with the meanest smirk. Most of his courtier misunderstood and didn't know where he actually stood. I do not think that he would snigger and use a word rhyming with rugger: he only wished Bognor was bigger. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Bigger Bognor
Romany on 21-02-2011
Bigger Bognor
Ha ha, clever you as always!

Romany.

Author's Reply:
Cheers Romany.

Luigi x

stormwolf on 21-02-2011
Bigger Bognor
haha imagine your last words being so sort of...well...funny?
Witty as ever Luigi.
Alison x

Author's Reply:
Do you know, Alison, when I need a witty riposte I can't think of one. Would I be able to find one on my death bed? I wonder. I am reminded of a joke about a dying shopkeeper who, on discovering that all his family was at his bedside, said: 'Who the hell is minding the shop?'

Luigi x

RoyBateman on 24-02-2011
Bigger Bognor
I've never been convinced that George V had the slightest inclination to wit, and if he did come up with this it must have been his most memorable quip ever. Certainly, he'd never have lasted through the matinee at the Glasgow Empire...then, neither did most professional comedians. I believe that the saying was "If they like you, they let you live". I digress again - enjoyed it: witty as always!

Author's Reply:
We have to give the poor bloke the benefit of the doubt, Roy. Although he and most comedians wouldn't have a chance at the Glasgow Empire, I am sure that your wit, abundant in many of your humorous pieces, would win over the recalcitrant audience.
Cheers, Luigi.


Dying Words (posted on: 18-02-11)
One of my entries to the Weekly Challenge.

I doubt that one could forget Horatio Nelson's last words. But was it 'kiss me' or kismet? They sat all night in the Lords discussing, without a result. And Emma Hamilton, I bet, may've deemed it was an insult to imply that he would have let a bloke to give him a smacker. She knew she'd been described by her lover as a lovely cracker - to which many subscribed - so she ignored the rumour that the gossips spread. She kept her good humour, her sanity and a cool head. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Dying Words
geordietaf on 18-02-2011
Dying Words
Nice one Luigi. Next, what would you say about 'Not tonight, Josephine'? πŸ™‚

Author's Reply:
Thanks Paul. Strange that you should mention 'Not tonight, Josephine'; one of my earlier poems was exactly on that topic and, if I remember well, that was its title. I have searched in vain in my archive for that 'masterpiece' but unfortunately it has disappeared. It can't have been all that good after all.

stormwolf on 20-02-2011
Dying Words
If it was one of the lords the chances are it would have been "kiss me" but with good old Horatio I reckon it was "kismet."
Whatever it was it stimulated some great works of art.

http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/walker/collections/19c/west.aspx
Nice poem Luigi

Alison x

Author's Reply:
I agree with you Alison, too much of a macho mano was old Horatio. It is easy getting things wrong. Even that painting incorrectly shows Nelson dying on the deck whereas he died below deck.
Thanks for reading and commenting.

Luigi x


A Playboy Of The Western World (posted on: 18-02-11)
Inspired by a question from Shadow in a comment to one of my poems. She asked: "Btw, are you sure his name wasn't 'Silvio'?"

Silvio arrived on this earth without fanfare. He was the latest addition to a large clan and when he grew up, became a billionaire. There was nothing to stop this lucky man. The girls flocked to him like bees to honey but whether it was for his Latin charm or the possibility to make a lot of money, they did not seem to have any qualm. His popularity with the maidens was such that jealous people spoke of impropriety but the tittle-tattle didn't amount to much and he remained the toast of high society. He was made, like a saucepan, of Teflon and nothing would stick to his reputation; he seemed that he could go on and on living a life of debauch and ostentation. But what public opinion could not stop was brought to a halt by creeping old age. His bubble burst and he became a flop and he could do nothing else but rage. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for A Playboy Of The Western World
franciman on 18-02-2011
A Playboy Of The Western World
It's not just Playboys who can't keep it up as they age. Made me laugh, very clever verse Luigi.

Cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Jim, you are a gent. I am not sure at what age inflation becomes deflation but I am sure that you are right.
Thanks for the comment and rating. Much appreciated.

shadow on 18-02-2011
A Playboy Of The Western World
Delighted to have kick-started your muse - you have certainly caught the essence of the man - do I detect a tinge of envy? It's the hair which fascinates me . . .

Author's Reply:
Thanks for the inspiration, Moya. Once somebody makes an enquiry I feel duty bound to reply.
No envy, I can assure you. I am just an impartial commentator on the parlous state of an ageing Lothario.
The usual caveat applies: 'Any resemblance to a real person, dead or alive, is purely coincidental.'

Luigi x

Corin on 20-02-2011
A Playboy Of The Western World
A dangerous man Luigi - I am sorry for your poor country. There was a program on Radio 4 about Italian politics - made me realise how little I understood. That there is still a real yearning for partition and how much Macho Man is admired in Italy, even though the women are beginning to protest.

Author's Reply:
Who says he's a dangerous man, David? His opponents do.
If you had lived in Italy, as I have, you would have regarded politics as most natives do: nothing to worry about, one lot goes and another one arrives, just as bad as each other. Life goes on regardless of the parties' colour. The less government there is, the better the country fares.
There are those who think they can solve the nation's problems and do their utmost to unseat the incumbent politicos and when they eventually succeed they make a bigger mess. Sometimes the devil you know is better than the one you don't. I have been away from that country many years and I am not au fait with the present situation but I would be surprised if attitudes had changed radically from my days.
Cynically yours, Luigi.

stormwolf on 20-02-2011
A Playboy Of The Western World
written with your usual insightful wit dear. I have to agree with your sentiments about politics in Italy. Just the same here..One bunch of ineffectual old boys after the other. I try to keep my mind on higher things as the thought of what they do is too depressing.
cynically yours too
Alison x


Author's Reply:
Dear Alison, in Italy we have a saying: "Tutto il mondo Γ¨ paese" which, translated, reads: "It's the same the whole world over".
Your comment seems to confirm that. Let's keep our minds on higher things.

Luigi x


Fall From Grace (posted on: 14-02-11)
Crime and punishment.

I have often told you about Big Carlo and of his louche approach to the fair sex but I have never revealed his darker side. He thought he was God's gift to women but in reality he was a misogynist. He treated ladies as if they were his chattel to be used and discarded at his pleasure. He had been divorced by his first wife when caught in flagrante with a typist and right away he embarked on affairs which never lasted for more than a month. He was an inveterate adulterer who cheated not only on his wife but on the mistresses but his conquests soon rumbled his plans and before long he found he was unable to exercise his charms on anyone. His attitude didn't win him any fans and he now lives, dejected, all alone and I fear that for evermore it shall be so. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for Fall From Grace
RoyBateman on 15-02-2011
Fall From Grace
Ah, maybe this sad end was inevitable...but perhaps those of us who've taken a different attitude (Or not been so lucky...) are always going to be smitten by schadenfreude* at the would-be Casanova's downfall. The more you try to take in life, the less you give, the less you ultimately end up with...just like that snippet at the very end of the final Beatles album, eh?
* HOPE I spelled that correctly - why is there no flippin' English equivalent??

Author's Reply:
Sorry Roy, I have put my reply in the wrong box. See below, thanks.

Ionicus on 15-02-2011
Fall From Grace
Roy, until you raised the question I never wondered why there wasn't an English equivalent of schadenfreude, which you have spelled right BTW. Now I shall lose sleep thinking about it.
You have stated a fundamental truth in saying that the more we try to take in life, the less we ultimately end up with. Mind you, I have known some bastards who got away with it!
Thanks for letting me have your thoughts.

Author's Reply:

shadow on 15-02-2011
Fall From Grace
A sad end - but one feels served the b***** right. Btw, are you sure his name wasn't 'Silvio'?

Author's Reply:
Quite right, Moya. That's no way to treat the ladies. Funnily enough I haven't heard anything but praise for Silvio.

Luigi x

sybarite on 16-02-2011
Fall From Grace
You have a wonderful grasp on human charms and foibles, Luigi.
Schadenfreude--a new word for me, many thanks!

Author's Reply:
Could it be that being a Methuselah I have enough experience to evaluate human nature? Perhaps.
Don't thank me for mentioning schadenfreude, it was from Roy's comment. I want to thank you in turn for stopping by.

Luigi xx


All Is Fair In Love And War (posted on: 11-02-11)
But you have to be quick!

Paul, Charles and Francesco, three men who fancied Betty. They squabbled with each other and their quarrels were petty. The three rivals were cunning and each outdid the others. The losers would be running to their respective mothers to gain comfort and solace. The winner would, instead, be the one that the maiden would eventually wed. The rivals fought the battle with increasing intensity; it looked as if the contest would go on for an eternity. But while everyone claimed that he was the right guy she got engaged and married an American G.I. © Luigi Pagano 2011
Archived comments for All Is Fair In Love And War
franciman on 11-02-2011
All Is Fair In Love And War
You just can't trust these Americans. Really made me laugh, Luigi.

Cheers,
Jim

Author's Reply:
Don't let Obama hear you say that, Jim. Aren't the Brits supposed to have a special relationship with Uncle Sam?
Nice to know that the humour of this piece was appreciated. Thank you.

geordietaf on 11-02-2011
All Is Fair In Love And War
I bet that happened quite a lot once upon a time.

The quiet final stanza is very effective

Author's Reply:
It did indeed happen often during and after World War II, geordie.
Grateful for your interest, many thanks.

sybarite on 12-02-2011
All Is Fair In Love And War
Your sense of humor shines