Comments Stream

  • ionicus

    From ionicus on INSOMNIAC

    Hello Tony, welcome back. Perhaps we can tempt you to resume the music quiz. It was an entertaining feature that most people, including myself, enjoyed. Congratulations on the pick for your very descriptive poem on sleep deprivation
    Best, Luigi

    Go to comment
    2022/12/15 at 7:47 pm
    • amman

      From amman on INSOMNIAC

      Hi Luigi. Good to reconnect. Thanks for reading and commenting this poor old insomniac. I see a few of the old gang have featured lately; hopefully more to come. Yeah, re-establishing the music quiz would be great but I’m not sure how to set it up, technical tyro that I am. Perhaps Steve will reappear out of the wilderness one day to join in. Anyway, I’ll get back into the swing of reading and commenting in the new year.
      Happy X’mas.

      Go to comment
      2022/12/20 at 4:54 am
  • Gothicman

    From Gothicman on Rosie

    Did she read your tealeaves, Luigi, in the ‘varicoloured caravan’? I think it is only cockney rhyming slang, not a historical person? Gypsy Rose Lee was an Americal stripper I’ve been told… never seen her….. Your usual skilled rhyme, liked the humour, and the picture. No, to keep a sensual, wayward soul, you have to join the travelling folk.
    Best, Trevor

    Go to comment
    2022/12/14 at 5:29 pm
    • ionicus

      From ionicus on Rosie

      The cockney slang reminds us of the Romany gypsies and their nomadic life and can be an inspiration to embroider a fictional tale of a beautiful Gitane whose name may be Rosie but not necessarily Lee, like the burlesque entertainer.

      Go to comment
      2022/12/14 at 10:09 pm
  • ionicus

    From ionicus on Crossing Over

    The natural inclination of two passionate adolescents crossing the metaphorical Rubicon draws no inspiration from old Sigmund’s interpretations.

    Go to comment
    2022/12/14 at 2:53 pm
    • Gothicman

      From Gothicman on Crossing Over

      Well said, and you’re right Luigi, things happen in Nature, irrespecive of science trying to explain them, not only for simply understanding why and how, but in order to help counteract individual suffering and persecution due to non-factual ignorance (e.g. Alan Turing). With Freud’s hypothesis being proven as true, and accepted as such by society at large, including religion, then the biological variations in the compulsions to love and be loved in order to remain mentally healthy would be seen to be, not morally, which has no part in it, but biologically justified, that sexual disposition is not a matter of free choice, even while, in one particular case, it would still require legal control. The young and non-consenting need to be protected irrespecive of explanation?

      Go to comment
      2022/12/14 at 4:59 pm
  • ionicus

    From ionicus on December Then

    An Interesting and informative poem, Trevor. I have read that Ophiuchus people are seekers of wisdom and knowledge. Also that the serpent associated with the 13th zodiac is symbolic of healing and the sign used to represent the medical profession.
    I enjoyed it.
    Best, Luigi.

    Go to comment
    2022/12/14 at 2:40 pm
    • Gothicman

      From Gothicman on December Then

      Yes, different sites have different descriptions, Luigi. The medical profession is full of begrudging people, it’s the hierarchical system! With this 13th zodiac sign included, which many think would be justified, the zodiac periods would of course be shorter causing me, for example to leave Libra and become a Virgo, hardly believable! Haha!
      Thanks for your comments, Trevor

      Go to comment
      2022/12/14 at 5:11 pm
  • ionicus

    From ionicus on #3 – Twisted Tongue.

    I too remember Claire Nixon. She was also involved with Gold Dust magazine (which has now ceased publication) and, if I remember well, had a website on which she hosted work by other UKA authors but can’t recall any of mine reaching that page.
    Nice to be reminded of the good old days.
    Cheers, Luigi.

    Go to comment
    2022/12/14 at 1:15 pm
    • jay12

      From jay12 on #3 – Twisted Tongue.

      Hi Luigi, thank you for your read and your comment. Hopefully the good old days can be the good present day times too. Take care.

      Go to comment
      2022/12/14 at 3:05 pm
  • Gothicman

    From Gothicman on December Then

    December diary insert put back by author:
    I don’t think we’re doing Richard any favours here by not making an effort to start afresh, assuming he as well still wants the site to succeed, especially if helped financially? One can only actively contribute and comment on work that personally appeals in this newly-liberated, main section, the functional heart of the site, and hope it picks up again after months of neglect.
    During the last year or so, the site continued to stagnate even while free from repelling negative activity, even while being friendly and sufficiently inclusive. Grateful comment takers who do not make any comments themselves will always reduce the gregariousness of the site to some degree, so hopefully not many fall in that category? Also, the site may be too difficult to use for some?
    Forum discussions ad nauseum on why the site is failing, by mainly non-work contributing members, is just flogging the site to death? And, incidentally, my simple seasonal goodwill greetings in the relevant forum section posted last week has not been published due to ‘under moderation’.
    It shows what an important and essential part Andrea played in maintaining site dynamics, being objective, flexible, and tolerant, and catering to all participants equally, maintaining the flow and interest, by keeping any moderating interventions down to a near invisible minimum. The site desperately needs this type of quality mainstay person again! A rare type of both literary and social engagement.
    Today, the trend is towards running your own limited showcase site as some members have now done. My daughter, who is a web designer based in London, set up such a personalised site for me some time ago to activate when time allows, so if this site goes down, that’s where I’ll go. Showcasing work supplies the incentive to make the considerable effort to write, it’s therapeutic, and also, in my case, keeps the rust off my first language.

    Go to comment
    2022/12/13 at 9:39 pm
  • Gothicman

    From Gothicman on For Simon.

    This eulogy will always carry the freshness of sentiment, being written from the heart, Jay, always serve it’s personal purpose. Thanks for posting! (Typo: ‘here’ should be ‘hear’).
    Best, Trevor

    Go to comment
    2022/12/09 at 4:16 pm
    • jay12

      From jay12 on For Simon.

      When I read it it does not feel like 19 years have passed since the day I wrote it to be honest. Thank you for your comment.

      Go to comment
      2022/12/10 at 6:54 pm
  • Gothicman

    From Gothicman on INSOMNIAC

    Luckily I’m not a regular insomniac, but I do recognise, and have on occasion suffered, the descriptions in this, to me, excellent poem, Tony. A great read.
    I do hope you’ve adapted to your new situation, and all is well with you. Enjoying summertime now too?
    Best, Trevor

    Go to comment
    2022/12/09 at 4:08 pm
    • amman

      From amman on INSOMNIAC

      Hi Trevor. Thanks for reading and commenting. This one too close to home; I’m a shocking insomniac and refuse to take sleeping pills! As for summertime, it’s ben p****** down here for the last month. I’ll get around to reading your stuff soon now That I’ve reconnected to the site.
      Cheers and happy X’mas.

      Go to comment
      2022/12/20 at 4:42 am
  • Gothicman

    From Gothicman on Anatomy of a suicide

    Good to read your work again, Aurelio! I don’t think you’ll mind if I briefly go off post and tell others the strange story of how I quite by chance met you in person, after having read your work on here over twenty years. A neighbour of mine said he had a friend who was having trouble with his ‘Mac Pro’ and could I help. I cycled a coupe of times to you on the other ‘bohemian’ side of town, did the necessary repairs incl. to the software to get you up and running again (even if you still insist on keeping some old corrupted programmes, which still spook occasionally!) and it was only while you were trying your work to test the computer, that I eventually realised you were/are Aurelio! Very much a ‘small world’ phenomenon! I can also tell members on here that you are a very accomplished pianist, which can be seen here on YouTube.

    Go to comment
    2022/12/09 at 3:48 pm
    • aurelio

      From aurelio on Anatomy of a suicide

      Thank you, Gothicman! Nice to have you back as well!

      Go to comment
      2022/12/09 at 11:19 pm
      • Gothicman

        From Gothicman on Anatomy of a suicide

        Haha Aurelio, don’t worry no more disclosures!

        Go to comment
        2022/12/09 at 11:34 pm
        • ionicus

          From ionicus on Anatomy of a suicide

          Sorry, Trevor, but we need you to make one more disclosure: the link to YOUTUBE! .)

          Go to comment
          2022/12/14 at 3:05 pm
          • Gothicman

            From Gothicman on Anatomy of a suicide

            Go to comment
            2022/12/14 at 6:22 pm
          • ionicus

            From ionicus on Anatomy of a suicide

            Thank you.

            Go to comment
            2022/12/14 at 9:39 pm
          • aurelio

            From aurelio on Anatomy of a suicide

            My excuse: “I just compiled a small set of recordings made about 1988-91 at home, not very professional, you’ll probably recognize most of the pieces – I had a different grand piano then, that later was scrapped. 
            I can’t play like this any more, since unfortunately by age I have lost all precision, but the recordings could be of historical interest. I almost forgot to include the last two pieces (by Chopin and Beethoven), why they landed last.”
            Forbear: not very professional, but honest though.
            Cheers!

            Go to comment
            2022/12/15 at 3:21 pm
          • ionicus

            From ionicus on Anatomy of a suicide

            I enjoyed your virtuosity, Aurelio. I haven’t gone through all your repertoire but shall return to it again and again, maestro.

            Go to comment
            2022/12/15 at 7:19 pm
          • aurelio

            From aurelio on Anatomy of a suicide

            Many thanks. There might be some more eventually…

            Go to comment
            2022/12/15 at 11:21 pm
  • Gothicman

    From Gothicman on #2 - Perfect 10

    Interesting to read these short interviews with familiar names, Jay, of which most, as I remember were predominantly prose writers, with the exception of Michael (Shackleton) and Jolen, who continued on site until recently? As I recall, both Andrea and Sunken did similar interviews didn’t they, Andrea’s often with current well-established off-site writers, and the munkey in his own unique style mixed with his usual witty humour?
    At 25, you must have been one of the youngest on site, which means I fear, a great many of the site originals are no longer with us. For me, the twenty-two years since the Millennium seem to have passed so quickly, and knowing that UKA started after that date seems strange to contemplate too? But I suppose it all depends on what stage of life oneself was at. I came here, when that great site BBC Poetry Corner was taken off, as did some fellow members incl. Shackleton, Kat, Elfstone, Bradene, and many others who unlike those four only continued for a short time. I remember you as James Hazlehurst (I had an aunt who married a ‘Hazlehurst’, who was a relation of a BBC music producer with that name, I believe). Thanks for posting, brought back many memories!
    Regards, Trevor

    Go to comment
    2022/12/09 at 3:23 pm
    • jay12

      From jay12 on #2 - Perfect 10

      I was one of the youngest. I know Linear who I interviewed was also my age, he may have been a year or two younger, but I probably was one of the young ones back then. Not anymore of course. Although i don’t feel any older in my head even if my knees and back disagree with that idea. I did write loads before I joined UKA but I did it all by myself at home and kept it all stuffed in a box underneath my bed. No one ever saw it and most of it has been lost. I have been able to keep most things backed up at home since the early 2000s on hard drives. I keep all of my writing now, even the bad stuff, because I always think one day I could dust it off and try again. I’ve got lots of bad stuff to go through and the pile has only ever gotten bigger. The job of going through it all might be a project for retirement if fate allows such a luxury to me. The BBC music producer you speak of is no relation to me, but I have been known to pretend he’s my uncle at parties in my youth. What a wit I used to be aye 🙂

      Thanks for reading and commenting. I hope you enjoyed the interviews.

      Go to comment
      2022/12/10 at 7:02 pm