Comments Stream

  • Ifyouplease

    From ifyouplease on Koumpounophobia

    will you take my word for it? it’s not koumpouno but koumpono.
    just because wikipedia has it as koumpounophobia it doesn’t mean it’s correct

    phonetically speaking it is incorrect and we don’t say “koumpouno κουμπούνω we say koumpono κουμπώνω.”
    https://el.wiktionary.org/wiki/%CE%BA%CE%BF%CF%85%CE%BC%CF%80%CF%8E%CE%BD%CF%89

    Go to comment
    2020/05/12 at 4:28 pm
    • Gammon

      From Gammon on Koumpounophobia

      It doesn’t matter. It has entered the English dictionary as “koumpounophobia”. That is the correct spelling of the word in English.

      I’m sure it happens all the time. For example:

      “The term gynophobia comes from the Greek γυνή – gunē, meaning woman” (Wikipedia).

      We can’t change it now and start saying “gunophobia”, and “gunaecologist”, and “misoguny”.

      Go to comment
      2020/05/12 at 5:33 pm
      • Ifyouplease

        From ifyouplease on Koumpounophobia

        and actually if we want it phonetically correct it’s yeenee. no g can ever replace GAMMA Γ correctly.

        https://media.giphy.com/media/ue1GO5swPdORq/giphy.gif

        Go to comment
        2020/05/12 at 8:43 pm
        • Gammon

          From Gammon on Koumpounophobia

          I’m pretty sure there is a huge number of words in the English language which derive from Ancient Greek but do not pronounce the original word correctly, in many cases entering English via Latin and sometimes also French. Does this piss you off? It’s just the development and evolution of language.

          Also, surely there are enormous numbers of words in Modern Greek which come from Ancient Greek but have undergone alterations? Surely that’s what Modern Greek is in its entirety, an alteration of Ancient Greek. Surely your own mother tongue is a bastardisation of the language of your ancestors?

          Also also, surely there are plenty of words in Modern Greek which take words from English but pronounce them incorrectly?

          Lots of languages do this. German does. It takes English words like ‘handy’, ‘laptop’, ‘fan’ and ‘band’ and changes the vowel sound into ‘hendy’, ‘leptop’, ‘fen’ and ‘bent’. It sounds really gay, like this gentleman:

          Go to comment
          2020/05/12 at 9:43 pm
          • Ifyouplease

            From ifyouplease on Koumpounophobia

            surely we can bastardize our own language without a problem, I mean the mother is the same at least she knows we are her kids. so in a way mother language has many bastard speakers but most of them if not all are her bastard kids nice way to put it huh? O tempora O glossic bastards

            Go to comment
            2020/05/13 at 1:33 am
          • Ifyouplease

            From ifyouplease on Koumpounophobia

            I’m not a scholar, but the way I see it Modern Greek is at least phonetically the purest form of pronunciating Attiki Dialecto, furthermore laptop is λαπτοπ in Greek and sounds exactly like laptop internet is ιντερνετ fast food is φαστ φουντ (like food/φουντ, like koum+ Bono) can you see how irritating it is for me to see a pouno where there should be the singer of U2??????

            https://media.giphy.com/media/5lfCgCmkOCvra/giphy.gif

            Go to comment
            2020/05/13 at 1:22 am
      • Ifyouplease

        From ifyouplease on Koumpounophobia

        you know that’s bastardization of a foreign language usually done by those who absolutely hate all other languages. if you don’t show respect you lose your right to be worthy of some respect. I guess ‘Englishes’ is some sort of Nemesis then and I must not fret over it at all, but welcome it as I like Nemesis a great deal. Q (intentionally typed Q)

        Go to comment
        2020/05/12 at 8:25 pm
  • Ifyouplease

    From ifyouplease on Tips for Getting Published

    I lack experience, never had a cat, but all animals seem to get sick, since you mention it here you probably know it for a fact

    I dread to think about this

    feisty women sleeping with their chauffeurs

    https://media.giphy.com/media/6w4QMdUSaiQqGQRQGJ/giphy.gif

    Go to comment
    2020/05/12 at 4:10 pm
  • Littleditty

    From littleditty on Tips for Getting Published

    very publishable – enjoyable. I don’t think I want to know what a scrofula is, ever…but more chance of a close encounter with a scrofula than a penny from poems kind of poem. Funny business, poetry or not. ‘Art will feed itself.’ is an optimistic motto to live and eat by…

    Go to comment
    2020/05/12 at 2:30 pm
    • Gammon

      From Gammon on Tips for Getting Published

      Scrofula is a disease, Nic. Associated with TB.

      I don’t think I’ve ever written a publishable poem in my life…

      Go to comment
      2020/05/12 at 2:37 pm
      • Littleditty

        From littleditty on Tips for Getting Published

        Aye – but I think you do! You should get a manager@10%…we all need one, along with a butler/butleress…and a room of one’s own….and a trust fund. Simple

        Go to comment
        2020/05/12 at 4:02 pm
        • Gammon

          From Gammon on Tips for Getting Published

          An agent, you mean? They’re not interested in poetry. It doesn’t sell.

          And the only poetry that does get published is stuff that cannot sell.

          Go to comment
          2020/05/12 at 6:17 pm
  • Gammon

    From Gammon on Op U Tree

    lol lol PDF files lol

    Go to comment
    2020/05/11 at 10:11 pm
  • Guajiros

    From guajiros on coming of age in Oxford

    For some reason I could never get my head around Oxford. Whenever I went there it always seemed to fall short of expectations and that was just the supermarkets. Sure we did the tourist thing seeing as we lived fairly close, but only once. After that it was just a town and pretty bland. I liked the canal, but not much else about the place maybe because they were (are?) so pedantic about parking.

    Certainly if I had to spend a night like that in Oxford in those circumstances it would be ingrained in my memory forever, much more than if it had been Cambridge (like Cambridge) and especially if it had been Bath. . . . Wot a snob, huh?

    Regarding the poetry, I found it well up to your usual high standard with some great lines. Particularly liked;

    I spare no envy on the wealthy,
    or wonder at the stark beauty
    of winter naked trees shyly budding
    or the sedative of colleges
    swaddled in dreaming histories

    I walk head down,
    sloshing through grey grit gutter slush
    seeking a glittering prize of my own –

    two bob or half a crown.

    Yes, good thanks

    Go to comment
    2020/05/11 at 2:37 pm
    • Coolhermit

      From coolhermit on coming of age in Oxford

      I was there winter 1964/65 – was hitching to Swansea but overnighted in the station waiting room – a roaring fire and huddle of locals – liked them so stopped a while – living on the streets and diving and ducking. I watched all Morse and Lewis dvds to glimpse Oxford again, it was iconic in my memory – my return there put that to death – it was just…nothing. I did all the Lewis/Morse streets and the unrecognisable covered market but still have not got to the canal nor the Botanical Gardens yet – don’t suppose I will now – won’t miss it 🙂

      Go to comment
      2020/05/11 at 2:54 pm
  • Littleditty

    From littleditty on coming of age in Oxford

    Locked in and locked out. Fresh cardboard and off to collect the glitter…caught in the middle of two cups of tea, the search is on. Between things at the mo poem, brings back memories!

    Go to comment
    2020/05/11 at 12:51 pm
    • Coolhermit

      From coolhermit on coming of age in Oxford

      It is an actual account of my 18th birthday – being 18 I could get a live-in job and hitched a ride to Woodstock and got a job at The Bear. I went back to Oxford on a coach trip in Feb. It was touristo horrendous. I went to the literary pub ‘Eagle and Child’ – left a few books – had one responder – the covered market is now sushi cafes and tat. Awful. I bet it’s great now 🙂

      Go to comment
      2020/05/11 at 1:10 pm
  • Coolhermit

    From coolhermit on O, my Emperor

    Beautiful words – translation is always difficult – you can ‘phrase book’ the correct word but not give its meaning or intent – I let the lines themselves wash over me. Not looking for an overall sense/meaning just letting the ripples ripple 🙂

    Go to comment
    2020/05/11 at 12:13 pm
    • Supratik

      From supratik on O, my Emperor

      Wonderful comment. Thank you.

      Go to comment
      2020/05/11 at 12:31 pm
      • Coolhermit

        From coolhermit on O, my Emperor

        “What a beautifully sad tune
        is humming in the wind!”
        lovely – not being narcissistic but here’s a short extract from one of mine :
        “a ballet of jasmine
        scents the breeze.

        there’s a woman
        singing fado –
        the haunting pain
        of love unrequited,”

        I love sentimental (not slushy) poetry and never read on if I see gratuitous foul language – poetry should be about beauty – there can also be beauty in ugliness – but ugly language for its own sake? Not for me 🙂

        Go to comment
        2020/05/11 at 12:58 pm
        • Supratik

          From supratik on O, my Emperor

          No, what is so narcissistic about that, we are writers, and we know deep inside how we overstep any comparison of degrees ha haha! However, one should have a balance, that’ all.
          Good to know what you like. I am sure you wouldn’t like what the Indian dalits write, they have now entered the domain of literature, their texts are full of abusive words, they have hatred about anything and everything, they hate the epics, viz. the Ramayana and the Mahabharata. It is an outburst of what they had to face for generations, e.g. cleaning the toilets of the brahmins, taking their shit from their toilets to the dumping ground, they had to wear a ring around their necks which sounded like a ding dong, the ones we would see on cows and goats, the sole purpose of those bells was to alarm the brahmins of their presence so they don’t touch their shadows if they did, the dalits were severely punished and the brahmins would have to bathe. These disgust, agonies abound in their literature. Once a dalit remarked that a firangi (a westerner) found this inhuman and he was criticized by the brahmins (for the dalits brahmins are still referred to as bastards, momfuckers, cocksuckers); he said, ‘come firangi, look at the bastards and see if you can help us, but your skin is also white, and you also smell like them, would you be able to recognise the smell of shit in our bodies, if you can’t ask those cockfuckers to poop and pee, you can then smell us hee hee hee, come firangi, come and smell us.’ This is also literature my friend, whether we like it or not doesn’t matter. Literature is all inclusive, like the golden garden where all birds sing, all flowers bloom. That said, you have the right to like or dislike what you touch, feel, see, hear, read, write; it is your belief-system and, you are always right.
          Blessings.

          Go to comment
          2020/05/12 at 5:42 am
          • Coolhermit

            From coolhermit on O, my Emperor

            Yes, you are right, there has to be room for all expressions, my choice is to turn away instantly from gratuitous filthy language.

            One of the oldest scriptures (Job in the Tanakh) says, “Does not the ear test words as the tongue tastes food?.” and I don’t want to taste corrupt food nor entertain ugly expressions. As you infer, my taste, my choice.

            In the case of your dalits – they have a very good reason for their loathing of the brahmins – and those who choose to read their work know exactly what to expect.

            I’ve been at poetry performances where comfortable middle-aged portly gentlemen have chosen to lace their works with ‘effin this’ or that merely in order to appear ‘down with the kids’ – it’s pathetic and I head to the bar 🙂

            Go to comment
            2020/05/12 at 6:00 am
          • Supratik

            From supratik on O, my Emperor

            I absolutely agree with you. If you ask my opinion, any instrument (eyes, ears, tongue, feet, hands, words, thoughts) that has been given to me needs to be used only for the good, and only for spreading kindness. Let literature include all that is written in words, I will use kindness and kindness alone. If I am not mistaken, even the Dalit literature will eventually be expressed in the warmest of words subsequent to the long waiting of independence of education it has merited now.
            I have consciously liberated myself from the addiction to judge. I don’t even judge those who do, I don’t need this weed to survive, and it’s exhilarating. Enjoy yourself!

            Go to comment
            2020/05/12 at 6:34 am
          • Coolhermit

            From coolhermit on O, my Emperor

            Agreed – I have an instant switch off – it is not conscious as much as instinctive – when couples kiss on the screen I instantly turn away or blot the image with a hand, if they are having sex I fast forward or again block the screen. The same goes for violence (in action or speech or even in the embarrassment of a character) – describing this gives the impression of a ‘holier than thou’ attitude whereas in fact it is purely an instant reflex.

            I have spent more than 40 years following a spiritual path maybe this has tuned my inner man to reject these things without natural thought.

            I have since my family moved on to live independent lives felt an affinity for ‘Vairagya’ – this is not necessarily recognised in the Western Hemisphere but hey ho that recognition is an irrelevance.

            Go to comment
            2020/05/12 at 6:44 am
          • Supratik

            From supratik on O, my Emperor

            Good to know this! I don’t think spirituality is one of the ways, it is the way. Anything else is a recipe for disaster and unhappiness. Sadhguru says it’s okay to have sex in the body, money in the pocket, as long as they don’t get in the mind.

            Go to comment
            2020/05/12 at 11:35 am
          • Coolhermit

            From coolhermit on O, my Emperor

            I’m watching youtube vids of Kumbh Mela – loving the philosophy which is beyond philosophy and beyond words 🙂

            Go to comment
            2020/05/12 at 1:33 pm
          • Supratik

            From supratik on O, my Emperor

            Great!

            Go to comment
            2020/05/14 at 6:10 am
  • Ifyouplease

    From ifyouplease on Koumpounophobia

    what is koumpouno?

    Go to comment
    2020/05/11 at 9:32 am
    • Ifyouplease

      From ifyouplease on Koumpounophobia

      in Greek it is koumpi, κουμπί. if it has anything to do with the Greek word, it should be koumpophobia.

      Go to comment
      2020/05/11 at 9:35 am
      • Gammon

        From Gammon on Koumpounophobia

        I understand you have a word κουμπώνω (koumpouno), which is the verb “to button”?….

        Go to comment
        2020/05/11 at 10:10 am
        • Ifyouplease

          From ifyouplease on Koumpounophobia

          yes we do, koumpono not koumpouno.

          if it is about to button it should be koumponophobia.
          if it is about fear of buttons then it is koumpophobia.

          Go to comment
          2020/05/11 at 10:24 am
          • Gammon

            From Gammon on Koumpounophobia

            What about hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia?

            Go to comment
            2020/05/11 at 10:39 am
          • Ifyouplease

            From ifyouplease on Koumpounophobia

            what is that?

            is hippo used instead of hype/ υπο popotono there is no such word in Greek mostro is not greek, pedalio you mean pedal?

            Go to comment
            2020/05/11 at 10:52 am
          • Gammon

            From Gammon on Koumpounophobia

            “River-horse monster one and a half feet long phobia” (Latin).

            It’s the fear of long words.

            Go to comment
            2020/05/11 at 11:00 am
          • Littleditty

            From littleditty on Koumpounophobia

            cut cunt and fuck off!- that was not a random insult, dear -does this nice button stretchyourneck poem need random outbursts of such?

            Go to comment
            2020/05/11 at 11:08 am
          • Littleditty

            From littleditty on Koumpounophobia

            No! read it again -fair enough…bloody buttons…

            Go to comment
            2020/05/11 at 11:11 am
          • Gammon

            From Gammon on Koumpounophobia

            Exactly. Fuck buttons!

            Go to comment
            2020/05/11 at 11:22 am
  • Gammon

    From Gammon on Three of Eight - Four Line Poems

    It’s almost four haikus. The first two could be.

    My name is Autumn
    and I am kicking leaves down
    the Mobius road

    My son is Winter
    he is cutting a clean path
    to another year

    Go to comment
    2020/05/10 at 11:18 pm
  • Gammon

    From Gammon on Sitting in a Twinkling Shack

    Sapphic Ode, yes, straight from Lesbos.

    This poem is about my grandmother. She wasn’t a Lesbian, by the way. Pure English.

    Go to comment
    2020/05/10 at 9:25 pm
    • Ifyouplease

      From ifyouplease on Sitting in a Twinkling Shack

      actually I wanted to find a connection between Lesbos and Albion so I googled

      I found this amazing poem, scanned it found the age part made me think of your last line.

      So… you might know more about this poem Daughters of Albion and is there a connection? Or has the universe been playing games with me?

      Go to comment
      2020/05/10 at 9:50 pm
      • Gammon

        From Gammon on Sitting in a Twinkling Shack

        It’s about England. I don’t think it has any connection to Lesbos or Sappho, I’m afraid.

        Go to comment
        2020/05/10 at 10:03 pm
        • Ifyouplease

          From ifyouplease on Sitting in a Twinkling Shack

          wait a minute, do you get different results when you google (chrome) Lesbos Albion?

          https://www.google.com/search?sxsrf=ALeKk01ypQMBXmFmXuWxC91Uko5MAK0FnA%3A1589142571033&ei=K2S4Xs7PAYf9rgTm54GwDg&q=lesbos+albion&oq=lesbos+albion&gs_lcp=CgZwc3ktYWIQA1C9eljNmwFgn60BaABwAHgAgAHUAYgBpwaSAQUwLjEuM5gBAKABAaoBB2d3cy13aXo&sclient=psy-ab&ved=0ahUKEwiOkcazkarpAhWHvosKHeZzAOYQ4dUDCAw&uact=5

          Go to comment
          2020/05/10 at 10:06 pm
          • Gammon

            From Gammon on Sitting in a Twinkling Shack

            Do I get different results to what if I do what?

            Go to comment
            2020/05/10 at 10:19 pm
          • Ifyouplease

            From ifyouplease on Sitting in a Twinkling Shack

            if you search for

            Lesbos Albion

            I get top result the title of the poem by William Blake.

            I do find some fascinating things about Albion and Ancient Greece though…

            from Brittanica:

            Albion, the earliest-known name for the island of Britain. It was used by ancient Greek geographers from the 4th century BC and even earlier, who distinguished “Albion” from Ierne (Ireland) and from smaller members of the British Isles. The Greeks and Romans probably received the name from the Gauls or the Celts. The name Albion has been translated as “white land”; and the Romans explained it as referring to the chalk cliffs at Dover (Latin albus, “white”)

            Go to comment
            2020/05/10 at 10:26 pm
          • Gammon

            From Gammon on Sitting in a Twinkling Shack

            Not sure about the origin of the name Albion. It’s related to the Celtic name for Scotland, ‘Alba’.

            I always thought the Greeks called the island Pretania, which the Romans modified to Britannia. I remember reading about Pytheas of Massilia, who called it that.

            If I google “Lesbos Albion”, the top result is a book about William Blake and the Daughters of Albion. In the book there is a reference to Lesbos. Something about the clitoris being “a bastard plant”.

            Go to comment
            2020/05/10 at 10:43 pm
          • Ifyouplease

            From ifyouplease on Sitting in a Twinkling Shack

            who says that it is a bastard plant? can you explain what this could possibly mean?

            Go to comment
            2020/05/11 at 8:42 am
          • Gammon

            From Gammon on Sitting in a Twinkling Shack

            No.

            John Wilkes (1888) says so. You will have to ask him.

            Go to comment
            2020/05/11 at 9:07 am
          • Ifyouplease

            From ifyouplease on Sitting in a Twinkling Shack

            I know what it means but….but did he?

            yeah it is a bastard plant.

            there is a myth gods contesting who is able to feel bigger sexual pleasure, Zeus or Hera. and the goddess won with her 12 hidden testicles. did you know that?

            Go to comment
            2020/05/11 at 9:22 am
          • Gammon

            From Gammon on Sitting in a Twinkling Shack

            I didn’t… You Greeks are funny…

            Go to comment
            2020/05/11 at 9:38 am
          • Ifyouplease

            From ifyouplease on Sitting in a Twinkling Shack

            many myths have been censored, I have a copy which I found searching in garbage somebody had thrown away old books.

            it was a rare publication, second, before myths were censored.

            another interesting myth was about Zeus and Shame/Αιδώς… where he placed her as a Quality in Humans and how she reacted and under which condition she would accept to… enter.

            Go to comment
            2020/05/11 at 9:44 am
          • Gammon

            From Gammon on Sitting in a Twinkling Shack

            Isn’t Clitoris also a Greek island?

            Go to comment
            2020/05/10 at 10:49 pm
          • Ifyouplease

            From ifyouplease on Sitting in a Twinkling Shack

            I don’t think so well not at least in my timeline…

            Go to comment
            2020/05/11 at 8:45 am
    • Ifyouplease

      From ifyouplease on Sitting in a Twinkling Shack

      Can that be Love, that drinks another as a sponge drinks water,
      That clouds with jealousy his nights, with weepings all the day,
      To spin a web of age around him, grey and hoary, dark;
      Till his eyes sicken at the fruit that hangs before his sight?
      Such is self-love that envies all, a creeping skeleton,
      With lamplike eyes watching around the frozen marriage bed!

      daughters of Albion

      Go to comment
      2020/05/10 at 9:35 pm
  • Ifyouplease

    From ifyouplease on Sitting in a Twinkling Shack

    yes he is the master of form that mastered him.

    Go to comment
    2020/05/10 at 9:19 pm
  • Littleditty

    From littleditty on Sitting in a Twinkling Shack

    Saphhic ode? Der. Brill!

    Go to comment
    2020/05/10 at 9:11 pm
  • Littleditty

    From littleditty on Sitting in a Twinkling Shack

    sip tea -small teacups need refilling – keep sipping…loved this wee poem. What’s the form? Great form!

    Go to comment
    2020/05/10 at 9:10 pm
  • Coolhermit

    From coolhermit on The junk society

    “What has become of honesty and decency?
    Does it still exist at all in spite of all?”

    It’s the poet’s job to give the answers. We all know life is corrupted. We need answers 🙂

    Go to comment
    2020/05/10 at 9:31 am
  • Gammon

    From Gammon on Vulnerability

    Hello, Aurelio.

    I’ve made this point before, but I will say it again.

    You would be a much better writer if you didn’t use so many adjectives and adverbs.

    Adverbs in particular ruin poetry, they kill it. They are unpoetic and usually unnecessary. They give too much, and too literal, information. It would be better to replace them with some kind of comparison or metaphor, or just leave them out completely.

    Here you have ‘invariably’, ‘certainly’, and ‘reasonably’. None of these are needed.

    Go to comment
    2020/05/10 at 8:49 am
    • Coolhermit

      From coolhermit on Vulnerability

      I like the poem however it lacks a focus – feels like the first draft where the writer gets it ‘out of their system’ and then the real work of poetry starts in earnest.

      Regarding adjectives: Ezra Pound told Ernest Hemingway to “distrust adjectives”. He felt that they could be a hindrance and that they could infect a writer, ruining his work with superflous (sic), corrupting influences.

      ps I used to host a poetry group – not an open-mic but a bring summat, read and listen to comments and critiques – nothing harsh – genuine encouragement.

      It soon fell away to just one or two as people only wanted unstinted praise – say one word might be out of place and they’d freak out.

      I rarely commented here and elsewhere for the same reason – however I reckon we all need to look our work through others’ eyes, entertain the criticism without necessarily accepting it.

      We are all works in progress 🙂

      Go to comment
      2020/05/10 at 9:28 am
      • Aurelio

        From aurelio on Vulnerability

        I appreciate very much your remarks, comments and criticism and take it to heart. However these pieces were written some time ago, and it feels too late to rework them now – “dum sripsisti, scripsisti”. Nevertheless, I will certain learn from every remark.

        Go to comment
        2020/05/10 at 2:28 pm
  • Ifyouplease

    From ifyouplease on hip hooray for lockdown

    I just realized I kinda liked how others lead their lives outdoors working etc.. My life was the same, there never was a sense of lockdown changing my daily habits. As a recluse facing dog emergencies I simply had to go the vet to clinics without a mask the world was just as stupidly tragic as it always were.

    Go to comment
    2020/05/09 at 7:48 pm
    • Coolhermit

      From coolhermit on hip hooray for lockdown

      I rarely leave the house anyway – the lockdown has not changed my life one iota 🙂 -by the way way I just watched a UK film “Ill met by moonlight” about the kidnapping of a German general in Crete. I thought it was a bit far-fetched but then saw some Greek documentaries and it was all really true. Amazin. Kriti looked fantastic too. Rick.

      Go to comment
      2020/05/09 at 7:53 pm
      • Ifyouplease

        From ifyouplease on hip hooray for lockdown

        never been there and I doubt I ever will. it would be a bit far-fetched if nobody in Crete ever kidnapped a German general.

        Go to comment
        2020/05/09 at 8:00 pm
        • Coolhermit

          From coolhermit on hip hooray for lockdown

          They were British officers – they took the General across the island – 18 days being hunted by thousands of Germans – the General was taken to Cairo – there was a follow up documentary from 1972 in which the partisans were brought back together and the British officer – then the General himself. It was very moving – old men, old enemies, but those days had passed 🙂

          Go to comment
          2020/05/09 at 8:04 pm
  • Ifyouplease

    From ifyouplease on a life frozen by a moment of time

    the greeks say “cold hands warm heart” I think it’s a universal phrase just googled it. for some reason I almost believe it’s not true. a sentimental write..

    Go to comment
    2020/05/09 at 7:43 pm
    • Coolhermit

      From coolhermit on a life frozen by a moment of time

      oh her hands were warm that evening and she had the coldest of hearts but I was not to know that until she broke my heart 🙂

      Go to comment
      2020/05/09 at 7:46 pm
      • Ifyouplease

        From ifyouplease on a life frozen by a moment of time

        sorry for asking but was she married already? it’s your line she would never be free.

        Go to comment
        2020/05/09 at 7:56 pm
        • Coolhermit

          From coolhermit on a life frozen by a moment of time

          Married – estranged from husband – the ‘never be free’ was my invention to create a sad ending. As it was in reality we had a crazy affair 🙂

          Go to comment
          2020/05/09 at 7:58 pm
          • Ifyouplease

            From ifyouplease on a life frozen by a moment of time

            she may have been the type that doesn’t deserve becoming a poem without mentioning her warm palms (then , perhaps and indeed)

            Go to comment
            2020/05/09 at 8:08 pm
          • Coolhermit

            From coolhermit on a life frozen by a moment of time

            I put her in another pome written years ago – a performance piece – it’s on UKA https://ukauthors.com/2017/11/03/meeting-mrs-potiphar/. But in life and imagination, everything and everyone might or might not be true, be real, or not 🙂 Rick

            Go to comment
            2020/05/09 at 8:13 pm
          • Ifyouplease

            From ifyouplease on a life frozen by a moment of time

            well bloody romantic fantasy strictly for poetic reasons can get you into trouble with or without an affair! people believe what they read and what they write! lol

            Go to comment
            2020/05/09 at 8:23 pm
          • Coolhermit

            From coolhermit on a life frozen by a moment of time

            Ah well, people believe what they want to believe – I live in a thousand dimensions, with 1000 names, 1000 truths, 1000 lies – you won’t find me in my work – only passing
            shadows 🙂

            Go to comment
            2020/05/09 at 8:31 pm
          • Ifyouplease

            From ifyouplease on a life frozen by a moment of time

            that’s so neat. wish I could do it!

            Go to comment
            2020/05/09 at 8:33 pm
          • Coolhermit

            From coolhermit on a life frozen by a moment of time

            the trouble is people actually think the pomes are true accounts – hardly ever but I like to give a sense of authenticity 🙂

            Go to comment
            2020/05/09 at 8:38 pm
          • Ifyouplease

            From ifyouplease on a life frozen by a moment of time

            yes because with authenticity you may obtain authority in fact one of the greatest joys of writing is persuading others you are authentic and the only one authorized to know what’s real and what’s not.

            Go to comment
            2020/05/09 at 9:02 pm
          • Coolhermit

            From coolhermit on a life frozen by a moment of time

            I’m a piscean – we hide ourselves away in the bulrushes 🙂

            Go to comment
            2020/05/09 at 8:36 pm
          • Ifyouplease

            From ifyouplease on a life frozen by a moment of time

            I know you pisces very well. both my parents belong to this star sign and my current best friend does also, not to mention a couple of other souls I have met. Charismatic to say the least. You may hide from others but it’s nearly impossible from your immediate family for which you (and your dreamworld) is an open book.

            Go to comment
            2020/05/09 at 8:58 pm
          • Coolhermit

            From coolhermit on a life frozen by a moment of time

            I have little contact with my family (7 children 10 grandchildren) – I live in my own world 😉

            Go to comment
            2020/05/09 at 9:02 pm
          • Ifyouplease

            From ifyouplease on a life frozen by a moment of time

            wow… you certainly seem to have lived first then write (as Greek literary circles say ‘first you live then you write’)

            Go to comment
            2020/05/09 at 9:07 pm
          • Coolhermit

            From coolhermit on a life frozen by a moment of time

            Yes – young writers are full of hopes, expectations and certainties – as we get older, have raised a family, been successful, failed etc etc and know and have seen and assimilated more our writing has a deep rich fecund pile from which to draw example and metaphor. That is not to say youg people cannot write but their work is subject to their youth and can be overridden by their ambition – at my age I know I’m no big deal
            …. 🙂

            Go to comment
            2020/05/09 at 9:15 pm
          • Ifyouplease

            From ifyouplease on a life frozen by a moment of time

            yeah but what if a younger person has absolutely no plan or intention to live all these things? what if the younger person strongly believes in vanitas vanitatum omnia vanitas and just observes with bitter hope the very end of his/hers and everybody’s illusions?

            Go to comment
            2020/05/09 at 9:19 pm
          • Coolhermit

            From coolhermit on a life frozen by a moment of time

            Life brings what it brings – not what we choose – my life was wrecked (and my plans and planned future) by my wife leaving me with a huge family to care for – not what I expected – these things just are. How do you make God laugh? Tell him your plans. These matters are for long taverna evenings over ouzo or retsina or even coffee and cigarettes. 🙂

            Go to comment
            2020/05/09 at 9:30 pm
  • Coolhermit

    From coolhermit on EN ROUTE BY TRAIN TO UFA

    More…want more 🙂

    Go to comment
    2020/05/09 at 7:27 pm
  • Gammon

    From Gammon on EN ROUTE BY TRAIN TO UFA

    Do you actually speak Russian, Daff? Or just Welsh?

    Go to comment
    2020/05/09 at 5:39 pm
    • Daffni

      From Daffni on EN ROUTE BY TRAIN TO UFA

      Yes, I do speak Russian and used to teach it but am out of practice now due to old age. As for Welsh; as I live here and did learn a lot , that too is rusty. I meant to concentrate on Welsh while locked down but seem to have spent all spare time trying to sort out my computer. The technology is harder than the Welsh.

      Go to comment
      2020/05/10 at 3:13 pm
    • Ifyouplease

      From ifyouplease on EN ROUTE BY TRAIN TO UFA

      I vaguely remember that she speaks Russian. I like her writing style and she is one of the most positive members of UKA.

      Go to comment
      2020/05/09 at 8:26 pm
  • Littleditty

    From littleditty on Tae a Bagel

    Super! More!

    Go to comment
    2020/05/09 at 3:40 pm